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The Empirics of New Economic Geography

  • Redding, Stephen J.

Although a rich and extensive body of theoretical research on new economic geography has emerged, empirical research remains comparatively less well developed. This paper reviews the existing empirical literature on the predictions of new economic geography models for the distribution of income and production across space. The discussion highlights connections with other research in regional and urban economics, identification issues, potential alternative explanations and possible areas for further research.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 7307.

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Date of creation: May 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7307
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