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Pirate Attacks and the Shape of the Italian Urban System

Author

Listed:
  • Antonio Accetturo
  • Michele Cascarano
  • Guido de Blasio

Abstract

rom the sixteenth to the early nineteenth century, coastal areas of Italy (especially, in the south-west) were subject to attacks by pirates launched from the shores of Northern Africa. This paper documents that, in order to protect themselves, residents of coastal locations moved inland to mountainous and rugged areas. It also shows that such relocation constrained local economic development for a long period after the piracy threat had subsided. By hampering the growth of major urban centers, the attacks may have also had aggregate consequences on Italy’s post-WWII development.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio Accetturo & Michele Cascarano & Guido de Blasio, 2019. "Pirate Attacks and the Shape of the Italian Urban System," DEM Working Papers 2019/15, Department of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:trn:utwprg:2019/15
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Accetturo & Andrea Lamorgese & Sauro Mocetti & Paolo Sestito, 2019. "Local Development, Urban Economies and Aggregate Growth," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 5(2), pages 191-204, July.
    2. Lin, Jeffrey & Rauch, Ferdinand, 2022. "What future for history dependence in spatial economics?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C).
    3. Antonio Accetturo & Sauro Mocetti, 2019. "Historical Origins and Developments of Italian Cities," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 5(2), pages 205-222, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    City size distribution; Historical shocks; Local development; Aggregate effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • N9 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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