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Agglomeration and growth: The effects of commuting costs

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  • Antonio Accetturo

Abstract

We present a model of industrial location and endogenous growth with congestion costs. According to the interplay between knowledge spillovers and commuting costs, we are able to obtain both a Krugman-type and a bell-shaped agglomeration outcome. In the first case, the economy experiences a permanent income inequality in the steady state and income divergence in the transitional dynamics. In the second case, we observe an enlargement of the industrial core of the economy with a strong catching up by the periphery. Welfare analysis shows that congestion creates (in the bell-shaped agglomeration case) a negative welfare effect on peripheral unskilled workers and it renders the agglomerated equilibrium Pareto inferior to dispersion. Copyright (c) 2009 the author(s). Journal compilation (c) 2009 RSAI.

Suggested Citation

  • Antonio Accetturo, 2010. "Agglomeration and growth: The effects of commuting costs," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(1), pages 173-190, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:89:y:2010:i:1:p:173-190
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baldwin, Richard E & Martin, Philippe & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I P, 2001. "Global Income Divergence, Trade, and Industrialization: The Geography of Growth Take-Offs," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 5-37, March.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn & Jordan Rappaport, 2000. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1891, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Murata, Yasusada & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2005. "A simple model of economic geography a la Helpman-Tabuchi," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 137-155, July.
    4. Sukkoo Kim, 1995. "Expansion of Markets and the Geographic Distribution of Economic Activities: The Trends in U. S. Regional Manufacturing Structure, 1860–1987," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 881-908.
    5. Charlot, Sylvie & Gaigne, Carl & Robert-Nicoud, Frederic & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2006. "Agglomeration and welfare: The core-periphery model in the light of Bentham, Kaldor, and Rawls," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-2), pages 325-347, January.
    6. Richard Baldwin & Rikard Forslid & Philippe Martin & Gianmarco Ottaviano & Frederic Robert-Nicoud, 2005. "Economic Geography and Public Policy," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 7524.
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    Cited by:

    1. Colin Davis & Ken-Ichi Hashimoto, 2015. "Industry Concentration, Knowledge Diffusion and Economic Growth Without Scale Effects," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(328), pages 769-789, October.
    2. Fujishima, Shota, 2013. "Growth, agglomeration, and urban congestion," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1168-1181.
    3. Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "The duelling models: NEG vs amenity migration in explaining US engines of growth," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(3), pages 513-536, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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