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Resetting the Urban Network: 117-2012

  • Ferdinand Rauch
  • Guy Michaels

Do locational fundamentals such as coastlines and rivers determine town locations, or can historical events trap towns in unfavorable locations for centuries?� We examine the effects on town locations of the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, which temporarily ended urbanization in Britain, but not in France.� As urbanization recovered, medieval towns were more often found in Roman-era town locations in France than�in Britain, and this difference still persists today.� The resetting of Britain's urban network gave it better access to naturally navigable waterways when this was important, while many French towns remained without such access.

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File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/13112/paper684.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 684.

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Date of creation: 19 Nov 2013
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:684
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  19. Peter Temin, 2012. "The Roman Market Economy," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 9896, March.
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