IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/psm226.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Brock Smith

Personal Details

First Name:Brock
Middle Name:
Last Name:Smith
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psm226
http://brockdsmith.com

Affiliation

Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics
Montana State University-Bozeman

Bozeman, Montana (United States)
http://www.montana.edu/econ/

(406) 994-3701
(406) 994-4838
306 Linfield Hall, Bozeman, MT 59715-0292
RePEc:edi:damtsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Alexander James & Brock Smith, 2018. "The Geographic Dispersion of Economic Shocks: Evidence from the Fracking Revolution: Comment," Working Papers 2018-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
  2. Brock Smith, 2016. "The Resource Curse Exorcised: Evidence from a Panel of Countries," OxCarre Working Papers 165, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Brock Smith & Samuel Wills, 2015. "Left in the Dark? Oil and Rural Poverty," OxCarre Working Papers 164, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Brock Smith, 2014. "Dutch Disease and the Oil and Boom and Bust," OxCarre Working Papers 133, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  5. Alexander James & Brock Smith, 2014. "There will be blood: Crime rates in shale-rich U.S. counties," Working Papers 2014-04, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
  6. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Brock Smith, 2019. "Dutch disease and the oil boom and bust," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 52(2), pages 584-623, May.
  2. Brock Smith & Samuel Wills, 2018. "Left in the Dark? Oil and Rural Poverty," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(4), pages 865-904.
  3. Brock Smith, 2017. ", By Lori Leonard," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(9), pages 1535-1536, September.
  4. James, Alexander & Smith, Brock, 2017. "There will be blood: Crime rates in shale-rich U.S. counties," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 125-152.
  5. Smith, Brock, 2015. "The resource curse exorcised: Evidence from a panel of countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 57-73.
  6. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joseph & Smith, Brock, 2012. "Malthus, Wages, and Preindustrial Growth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(2), pages 364-392, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Pre-industrial revolution England did not grow, but was rich
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-11-03 19:56:00

Working papers

  1. Alexander James & Brock Smith, 2018. "The Geographic Dispersion of Economic Shocks: Evidence from the Fracking Revolution: Comment," Working Papers 2018-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Pollmann, 2020. "Causal Inference for Spatial Treatments," Papers 2011.00373, arXiv.org.
    2. Diemer, Andreas, 2020. "Spatial diffusion of local economic shocks in social networks: evidence from the US fracking boom," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 105868, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Cunningham, Scott & DeAngelo, Gregory & Smith, Brock, 2020. "Fracking and risky sexual activity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    4. Kevin Berry & Alexander James & Brock Smith & Brett Watson, 2019. "Geography, Geology, and Regional Economic Development," Working Papers 2019-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    5. Rickman, Dan & Wang, Hongbo, 2020. "What goes up must come down? The recent economic cycles of the four most oil and gas dominated states in the US," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).

  2. Brock Smith, 2016. "The Resource Curse Exorcised: Evidence from a Panel of Countries," OxCarre Working Papers 165, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Havranek & Roman Horvath & Ayaz Zeynalov, 2015. "Natural Resources and Economic Growth : A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 350, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    2. Jarrett, Uchechukwu & Mohaddes, Kamiar & Mohtadi, Hamid, 2019. "Oil price volatility, financial institutions and economic growth," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 131-144.
    3. Ferman, Bruno & Pinto, Cristine & Possebom, Vitor, 2017. "Cherry Picking with Synthetic Controls," MPRA Paper 78213, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kym Anderson, 2018. "Mining’s impact on the competitiveness of other sectors in a resource-rich economy: Australia since the 1840s," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 31(1), pages 141-151, May.
    5. Naif Alsagr & Stefan F. Van Hemmen Almazor, 2020. "Oil Rent, Geopolitical Risk and Banking Sector Performance," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 10(5), pages 305-314.
    6. Bonilla Mejía, Leonardo, 2020. "Mining and human capital accumulation: Evidence from the Colombian gold rush," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C).
    7. Mouhcine Guettabi & Alexander James, 2017. "Who Benefits From an Oil Boom? Evidence From a Unique Alaskan Data Set," Working Papers 2017-04, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    8. Alexander James, 2015. "Is education really underfunded in resource-rich economies? Evidence from a panel of U.S. states," Working Papers 2015-01, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    9. Bibek Adhikari, 2015. "When Does Introducing a Value-Added Tax Increase Economic Efficiency? Evidence from the Synthetic Control Method," Working Papers 1524, Tulane University, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2015.
    10. Ferman, Bruno & Pinto, Cristine Campos de Xavier, 2016. "Revisiting the synthetic control estimator," Textos para discussão 421, FGV EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas (Brazil).
    11. Edwards, Ryan B., 2016. "Mining away the Preston curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 22-36.
    12. Pierre Pecher, 2018. "Ethnic divisions and the effect of appropriative competition intensity on economic performance," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 165-193, May.
    13. Emmanuel Apergis & Nicholas Apergis, 2018. "What is extracted from earth is gold: are rare earths telling a new tale to economic growth?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 177-192, January.
    14. Okada, Keisuke & Samreth, Sovannroeun, 2019. "Oil Bonanza and the Composition of Government Expenditure," MPRA Paper 96657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Stephan E. Maurer, 2018. "Oil Discoveries and Education Spending in the Postbellum South," CEP Discussion Papers dp1526, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    16. Nemera Mamo & Sambit Bhattacharyya, 2018. "Natural Resources and Political Patronage in Africa: An Ethnicity Level Analysis," Working Paper Series 0418, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    17. Cristián Ducoing & José Peres-Cajías & Marc Badia-Miró & Ann-Kristin Bergquist & Carlos Contreras & Kristin Ranestad & Sara Torregrosa, 2018. "Natural Resources Curse in the Long Run? Bolivia, Chile and Peru in the Nordic Countries’ Mirror," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-25, March.
    18. Tiba, Sofien, 2019. "Modeling the nexus between resources abundance and economic growth: An overview from the PSTR model," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    19. Silvia Marchesi & Tania Masi, 2018. "Life After Default: Private vs. Official Sovereign Debt Restructurings," Development Working Papers 437, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    20. Morck, Randall & Nakamura, Masao, 2018. "Japan's ultimately unaccursed natural resources-financed industrialization," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 32-54.
    21. Johanna Richter & Alliana Salanguit & Alexander James, 2017. "The (Uneven) Spatial Distribution of the Bakken Oil Boom," Working Papers 2017-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    22. Anthony J. Venables, 2016. "Using Natural Resources for Development: Why Has It Proven So Difficult?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 161-184, Winter.
    23. Nouf Nasser Alsharif, 2017. "Three essays on growth and economic diversification in resource-rich countries," Economics PhD Theses 0317, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    24. Traviss Cassidy, 2019. "The Long-Run Effects of Oil Wealth on Development: Evidence from Petroleum Geology," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 129(623), pages 2745-2778.
    25. Zuo, Na & Zhong, Hua, 2020. "Can resource policy reverse the resource curse? Evidence from China," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    26. Maurer, Stephan E., 2019. "Oil discoveries and education provision in the Postbellum South," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    27. Bahram Sanginabadi, 2017. "Resource Abundance and Life Expectancy," Papers 1801.00369, arXiv.org.
    28. Björn Falkenhall & Jonas Månsson & Sofia Tano, 2020. "Impact of VAT Reform on Swedish Restaurants: A Synthetic Control Group Approach," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 122(2), pages 824-850, April.
    29. Jia Wang & Weici Yuan & Cynthia Rogers, 2020. "Economic Development Incentives: What Can We Learn From Policy Regime Changes?," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 34(2), pages 116-125, May.
    30. Atindra Dahal, 2020. "Re-defining Modernity and Development Dimension in Quest of Indigenous and Ingenuous Prosperity of Himalayan Region," Technium Social Sciences Journal, Technium Science, vol. 3(1), pages 11-25, February.
    31. Anderson, Kym, 2016. "Sectoral Trends and Shocks in Australia's Economic Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 11598, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    32. Adhikari, Bibek & Alm, James, 2017. "Evaluating the Economic Effects of Flat Tax Reforms Using Synthetic Control Methods," Working Paper Series 6770, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    33. James Cust & David Mihalyi, 2017. "Evidence for a Presource Curse? Oil discoveries, Elevated Expectations, and Growth Disappointments," OxCarre Working Papers 193, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    34. Vincent Géronimi & Claire Mainguy, 2020. "Exploitation minière et développement : des effets toujours controversés. Introduction," Mondes en développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 7-29.
    35. Maïmouna Diakite & Jean-François Brun & Souleymane Diarra & Nasser Ary Tanimoune, 2017. "The effects of tax coordination on the tax revenue mobilization in West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU)," Working Papers halshs-01535104, HAL.
    36. Itchoko Motande Mondjeli Mwa Ndjokou & Pierre Christian Tsopmo, 2017. "The effects on economic growth of natural resources in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does the quality of institutions matters?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 248-263.
    37. Bildirici, Melike E. & Gokmenoglu, Seyit M., 2020. "Precious metal abundance and economic growth: Evidence from top precious metal producer countries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    38. Cheng, Zhonghua & Li, Lianshui & Liu, Jun, 2020. "Natural resource abundance, resource industry dependence and economic green growth in China," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    39. James, Alexander, 2019. "Fata morganas in oil-rich, institution-poor economies," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 234-242.
    40. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Ahmed, Khalid & Tiwari, Aviral Kumar & Jiao, Zhilun, 2019. "Resource Curse Hypothesis and Role of Oil Prices in USA," MPRA Paper 96633, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Oct 2019.
    41. Joël CARIOLLE, 2016. "The voracity and scarcity effects of export booms and busts on bribery," Working Papers P146, FERDI.
    42. Roberto Álvarez & Álvaro García Marín & Sebastián Ilabaca, 2017. "Commodity Prices Shocks and Poverty Reduction in Chile," Working Papers wp449, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    43. Sofien Tiba & Mohamed Frikha, 2020. "Sustainability Challenge in the Agenda of African Countries: Evidence from Simultaneous Equations Models," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 11(3), pages 1270-1294, September.
    44. Graham A. Davis, 2020. "Large-sample evidence of income inequality in resource-rich nations," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(1), pages 193-216, July.
    45. Lashitew, Addisu A. & Werker, Eric, 2020. "Do natural resources help or hinder development? Resource abundance, dependence, and the role of institutions," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    46. Horváth, Roman & Zeynalov, Ayaz, 2016. "Natural resources, manufacturing and institutions in post-Soviet countries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 141-148.
    47. Ryan Decker & Meagan McCollum & Gregory B. Upton, Jr., 2020. "Boom Town Business Dynamics," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-081, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    48. Tania Masi & Roberto Ricciuti, 2016. "Oil discoveries and democracy," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-57, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    49. Grant Mark Nülle & Graham A. Davis, 2018. "Neither Dutch nor disease?—natural resource booms in theory and empirics," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 31(1), pages 35-59, May.
    50. Niknamian, Sorush, 2019. "Resource–Economic Growth Nexus, Role of Governance, Financial Development, Globalisation and War: Dynamic Approach," OSF Preprints akhsr, Center for Open Science.
    51. Adrian Wood, 2017. "Variation in structural change around the world, 1985-2015 (in Chinese): Patterns, causes and implications," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-34, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    52. Brock Smith, 2014. "Dutch Disease and the Oil and Boom and Bust," OxCarre Working Papers 133, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    53. Sofien Tiba & Mohamed Frikha, 2020. "Africa Is Rich, Africans Are Poor! A Blessing or Curse: An Application of Cointegration Techniques," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 11(1), pages 114-139, March.
    54. Nemera Gebeyehu Mamo, 2018. "Essays on natural resources in Africa: local economic development, multi-ethnic coalitions and armed conflict," Economics PhD Theses 0518, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    55. Laszlo Szalai, 2018. "Institutions and Resource-driven Development," World Journal of Applied Economics, WERI-World Economic Research Institute, vol. 4(1), pages 39-53, June.
    56. Bibek Adhikari & Romain A Duval & Bingjie Hu & Prakash Loungani, 2016. "Can Reform Waves Turn the Tide? Some Case Studies Using the Synthetic Control Method," IMF Working Papers 16/171, International Monetary Fund.
    57. James, Alexander, 2016. "The long-run vanity of Prudhoe Bay," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 270-275.
    58. Christopher A. Hartwell & Roman Horvath & Eva Horvathova & Olga Popova, 2019. "Democratic Institutions, Natural Resources, and Income Inequality," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 61(4), pages 531-550, December.
    59. Bibek Adhikari & Romain Duval & Bingjie Hu & Prakash Loungani, 2018. "Can Reform Waves Turn the Tide? Some Case Studies using the Synthetic Control Method," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 879-910, September.
    60. Chenyu Lu & Dai Wang & Peng Meng & Jiaqi Yang & Min Pang & Li Wang, 2018. "Research on Resource Curse Effect of Resource-Dependent Cities: Case Study of Qingyang, Jinchang and Baiyin in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(1), pages 1-21, December.
    61. Graham A. Davis, 2013. "Replicating Sachs and Warner's Working Papers on the Resource Curse," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1615-1630, December.
    62. Brock Smith, 2019. "Dutch disease and the oil boom and bust," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 52(2), pages 584-623, May.
    63. Rickman, Dan & Wang, Hongbo, 2020. "What goes up must come down? The recent economic cycles of the four most oil and gas dominated states in the US," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    64. Mohammad Kemal, 2016. "Ownership Rights versus Access Rights Allocation to Critical Resources: An Empirical Study of the Economic Impact of Changes in Oil Governance," Working Papers 2016-02, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    65. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Michael Keller & Rabah Arezki, 2017. "Resource Discovery and the Political Fortunes of National Leaders," Working Paper Series 0917, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.

  3. Brock Smith & Samuel Wills, 2015. "Left in the Dark? Oil and Rural Poverty," OxCarre Working Papers 164, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Jaimes & Reyer Gerlagh, 2017. "Resource-Richness and Economic Growth in Contemporary U.S," CESifo Working Paper Series 6778, CESifo.
    2. Arkadiusz Piwowar & Maciej Dzikuc, 2020. "Poverty and Social Exclusion: Is this a Problem in Rural Areas in the Visegrad Group Countries?," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(2), pages 45-54.
    3. Gradstein, Mark & Klemp, Marc P B, 2016. "Can Black Gold Shine? The Effect of Oil Prices on Nighttime Light in Brazil," CEPR Discussion Papers 11686, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Zuo, Na & Zhong, Hua, 2020. "Can resource policy reverse the resource curse? Evidence from China," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    5. McGregor, Thomas & Wills, Samuel, 2017. "Surfing a Wave of Economic Growth," Working Papers 2017-05, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Mar 2017.
    6. McGregor, Thomas & Wills, Samuel, 2016. "Natural Assets: Surfing a Wave of Economic Growth," Working Papers 2016-06, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    7. John Gibson & Susan Olivia & Geua Boe-Gibson, 2020. "Night Lights in Economics: Sources and Uses," CSAE Working Paper Series 2020-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Graham A. Davis, 2020. "Large-sample evidence of income inequality in resource-rich nations," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(1), pages 193-216, July.
    9. Vezina,Pierre-Louis, 2020. "The Oil Nouveau-Riche and Arms Imports," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9374, The World Bank.

  4. Brock Smith, 2014. "Dutch Disease and the Oil and Boom and Bust," OxCarre Working Papers 133, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Hilde C. Bjørnland & Leif Anders Thorsrud, 2015. "Commodity prices and fiscal policy design: Procyclical despite a rule," Working Papers No 5/2015, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    2. Michael Keller, 2019. "Wasted windfalls: Inefficiencies in health care spending in oil rich countries," Working Paper Series 0819, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    3. Nouf Nasser Alsharif, 2017. "Three essays on growth and economic diversification in resource-rich countries," Economics PhD Theses 0317, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    4. Torfinn Harding & Radoslaw Stefanski & Gerhard Toews, 2016. "Boom goes the price: Giant resource discoveries and real exchange rate appreciation," CDMA Working Paper Series 201604, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis, revised 08 Feb 2020.
    5. James Cust & Torfinn Harding & Pierre-Louis Vézina, 2019. "Dutch Disease Resistance: Evidence from Indonesian Firms," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(6), pages 1205-1237.
    6. José Fuinhas & António Marques & Alcino Couto, 2015. "Oil rents and economic growth in oil producing countries: evidence from a macro panel," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 257-279, November.
    7. Alhaji Jibrilla Aliyu & Shehu Mohammed Tijjani & Caroline Elliott, 2015. "Asymmetric cointegration between exchange rate and trade balance in Nigeria," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 1045213-104, December.
    8. Abbas Al-Mejren, 2015. "Impacts of Fiscal Legal Setting and Institutions on Budget Outcomes in the Rentire State of Kuwait," Working Papers 920, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2015.
    9. Gerhard Toews & Pierre-Louis Vezina, 2017. "Resource discoveries and FDI bonanzas; An illustration from Mozambique," OxCarre Working Papers 199, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    10. Eric W. Djimeu & Luc-Désiré Omgba, 2018. "Oil windfalls and export diversification in oil-producing countries: evidence from oil booms," Post-Print hal-01946573, HAL.
    11. Eric W. Djimeu & Luc-Désiré Omgba, 2018. "Oil windfalls might not be the problem in oil-producing countries: evidence from the impact of oil shocks on export diversification," EconomiX Working Papers 2018-18, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.

  5. Alexander James & Brock Smith, 2014. "There will be blood: Crime rates in shale-rich U.S. counties," Working Papers 2014-04, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Mason, Charles F. & Muehlenbachs, Lucija A. & Olmstead, Sheila M., 2015. "The Economics of Shale Gas Development," Energy: Resources and Markets 198980, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    2. Maniloff, Peter & Mastromonaco, Ralph, 2017. "The local employment impacts of fracking: A national study," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 62-85.
    3. Richard Jaimes & Reyer Gerlagh, 2017. "Resource-Richness and Economic Growth in Contemporary U.S," CESifo Working Paper Series 6778, CESifo.
    4. Mouhcine Guettabi & Alexander James, 2017. "Who Benefits From an Oil Boom? Evidence From a Unique Alaskan Data Set," Working Papers 2017-04, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    5. Bennett, Patrick & Ravetti, Chiara & Wong, Po Yin, 2020. "Losing in a Boom: Long-term Consequences of a Local Economic Shock for Female Labour Market Outcomes," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 3/2020, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    6. Timothy M. Komarek, 2018. "Crime and natural resource booms: evidence from unconventional natural gas production," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 61(1), pages 113-137, July.
    7. Paul Pelz & Steven Poelhekke, 2018. "Good mine, bad mine: Natural resource heterogeneity and Dutch disease in Indonesia," OxCarre Working Papers 214, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Johanna Richter & Alliana Salanguit & Alexander James, 2017. "The (Uneven) Spatial Distribution of the Bakken Oil Boom," Working Papers 2017-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    9. Muehlenbachs, Lucija & Staubli, Stefan & Chu, Ziyan, 2017. "The Accident Externality from Trucking," IZA Discussion Papers 10989, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. McCollum, Meagan & Upton, Gregory B., 2018. "Local labor market shocks and residential mortgage payments: Evidence from shale oil and gas booms," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 162-197.
    11. Beleche, Trinidad & Cintina, Inna, 2018. "Fracking and risky behaviors: Evidence from Pennsylvania," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 69-82.
    12. Alexander James & Nathaly M. Rivera, 2019. "Oil, Politics, and Corrupt Bastards," Working Papers 2019-04, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    13. Backstrom, Jesse, 2019. "Strategic Reporting and the Effects of Water Use in Hydraulic Fracturing on Local Groundwater Levels in Texas," Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University 307177, Center for Growth and Opportunity.
    14. Mayer, Adam, 2018. "The Fiscal Impacts of Energy: Perspectives from local governments in the Mountain West, USA," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 186-193.
    15. Ancev, Tiho & Merrett, Danielle, 2018. "Security Bonding in Unconventional Gas Development: Evidence from an Economic Experiment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 139-146.
    16. Grant D. Jacobsen, 2019. "The impact of energy booms on local workers," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 468-468, November.
    17. Diemer, Andreas, 2020. "Spatial diffusion of local economic shocks in social networks: evidence from the US fracking boom," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 105868, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Grant D. Jacobsen, 2019. "Who Wins In An Energy Boom? Evidence From Wage Rates And Housing," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(1), pages 9-32, January.
    19. Zwickl, Klara, 2019. "The demographics of fracking: A spatial analysis for four U.S. states," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 202-215.
    20. Gourley, Patrick & Madonia, Greg, 2018. "Resource booms and crime: Evidence from oil and gas production in Colorado," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 37-52.
    21. Grant Mark Nülle & Graham A. Davis, 2018. "Neither Dutch nor disease?—natural resource booms in theory and empirics," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 31(1), pages 35-59, May.
    22. Hess, Joshua & Manning, Dale & Iverson, Terry & Cutler, Harvey, 2016. "Uncertainty, Learning, and Local Opposition to Hydraulic Fracturing," MPRA Paper 79238, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Nathaly M. Rivera, 2019. "Is Mining an Environmental Disamenity? Evidence from Resource Extraction Site Openings," Working Papers 2019-05, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    24. Burkhardt, Jesse & Bayham, Jude & Wilson, Ander & Carter, Ellison & Berman, Jesse D. & O'Dell, Katelyn & Ford, Bonne & Fischer, Emily V. & Pierce, Jeffrey R., 2019. "The effect of pollution on crime: Evidence from data on particulate matter and ozone," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 98(C).
    25. Xu, Minhong & Xu, Yilan, 2020. "Fraccidents: The impact of fracking on road traffic deaths," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    26. Cunningham, Scott & DeAngelo, Gregory & Smith, Brock, 2020. "Fracking and risky sexual activity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    27. Harleman, Max & Weber, Jeremy G., 2017. "Natural resource ownership, financial gains, and governance: The case of unconventional gas development in the UK and the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 281-296.
    28. Fleming, David & Komarek, Timothy & Partridge, Mark & Measham, Thomas, 2015. "The Booming Socioeconomic Impacts of Shale: A Review of Findings and Methods in the Empirical Literature," MPRA Paper 68487, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    29. Gittings, R. Kaj & Roach, Travis, 2020. "Who Benefits from a Resource Boom? Evidence from the Marcellus and Utica Shale Plays," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
    30. Gearhart, Richard & Michieka, Nyakundi, 2019. "Natural resource abundance and healthcare efficiency in Appalachia: A robust conditional approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 985-996.
    31. Dmitry Burakov, 2019. "Oil Hikes, Drugs and Bribes: Do Oil Prices Matter for Crime Rate in Russia?," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 9(1), pages 84-94.
    32. Kevin Berry & Alexander James & Brock Smith & Brett Watson, 2019. "Geography, Geology, and Regional Economic Development," Working Papers 2019-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    33. Aragón, Fernando M. & Rud, Juan Pablo & Toews, Gerhard, 2018. "Resource shocks, employment, and gender: Evidence from the collapse of the UK coal industry," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 54-67.

  6. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Broadberry, Stephen & Campbell, Bruce M.S. & van Leeuwen, Bas, 2013. "When did Britain industrialise? The sectoral distribution of the labour force and labour productivity in Britain, 1381–1851," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 16-27.
    2. Clark, Gregory, 2013. "1381 and the Malthus delusion," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 4-15.

Articles

  1. Brock Smith & Samuel Wills, 2018. "Left in the Dark? Oil and Rural Poverty," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(4), pages 865-904.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. James, Alexander & Smith, Brock, 2017. "There will be blood: Crime rates in shale-rich U.S. counties," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 125-152.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Smith, Brock, 2015. "The resource curse exorcised: Evidence from a panel of countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 57-73.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joseph & Smith, Brock, 2012. "Malthus, Wages, and Preindustrial Growth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(2), pages 364-392, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Groth, Christian & Persson, Karl Gunnar, 2016. "Growth or stagnation in pre-industrial Britain? A revealed income growth approach," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 264, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Thomas Baudin & Robert Stelter, 2019. "The rural exodus and the rise of Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2019-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Clark, Gregory, 2013. "1381 and the Malthus delusion," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 4-15.
    4. Karol Jan Borowiecki & Alexander Tepper, 2013. "Accounting for breakout in Britain: The Industrial Revolution through a Malthusian lens," Staff Reports 639, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Maya Shatzmiller, 2015. "An early knowledge economy: the adoption of paper, human capital and economic change in the medieval Islamic Middle East, 700-1300 AD," Working Papers 0064, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    6. Thomas Baudin & Robert Stelter, 2016. "Rural exodus and fertility at the time of industrialization," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016020, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    7. Wallis, Patrick & Colson, Justin & Chilosi, David, 2016. "Puncturing the Malthus delusion: structural change in the British economy before the industrial revolution, 1500-1800," Economic History Working Papers 66816, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (6) 2014-05-24 2014-07-13 2014-11-28 2015-11-01 2016-05-28 2019-03-18. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2010-10-09 2014-05-24
  3. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (2) 2014-07-13 2014-11-28
  4. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2019-03-18
  5. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2016-05-28
  6. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2010-10-09
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2019-03-18

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Brock Smith should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.