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There Will Be Blood: Crime Rates in Shale-Rich U.S

Author

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  • Alexander James
  • Brock Smith

Abstract

Over the past decade, the production of shale oil and gas signicantly increased in the United States. This paper uniquely examines how this energy boom has aected regional crime rates throught the United States. There is evidence that, as a result of the ongoing shale-energy boom, shale-rich counties experienced faster growth in rates of both property and violent crimes including rape, assault, murder, robbery, burglary, larceny and grand-theft auto. These results are particularly robust for rates of assault, and less so for other types of crimes. Policy makers should anticipate these effects and invest in public infrastructure accordingly.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander James & Brock Smith, 2014. "There Will Be Blood: Crime Rates in Shale-Rich U.S," OxCarre Working Papers 140, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:140
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    File URL: https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:08c4c446-5110-4308-8ac8-94b4828dfe5b
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles F. Mason & Lucija A. Muehlenbachs & Sheila M. Olmstead, 2015. "The Economics of Shale Gas Development," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 269-289, October.
    2. Maniloff, Peter & Mastromonaco, Ralph, 2017. "The local employment impacts of fracking: A national study," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 62-85.
    3. Fleming, David & Komarek, Timothy & Partridge, Mark & Measham, Thomas, 2015. "The Booming Socioeconomic Impacts of Shale: A Review of Findings and Methods in the Empirical Literature," MPRA Paper 68487, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Chu, Ziyan & Muehlenbachs, Lucija & Staubli, Stefan, 2017. "The Accident Externality from Trucking," CEPR Discussion Papers 12314, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Grant D. Jacobsen, 2019. "Who Wins In An Energy Boom? Evidence From Wage Rates And Housing," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(1), pages 9-32, January.
    6. Gourley, Patrick & Madonia, Greg, 2018. "Resource booms and crime: Evidence from oil and gas production in Colorado," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 37-52.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural Resources; Hydraulic Fracturing; Crime; Resource Curse.;

    JEL classification:

    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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