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US State Fiscal Policy and Natural Resources

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  • Alexander James

Abstract

An analytical framework predicts that, in response to an exogenous increase in resource based government revenue, a benevolent government will partially substitute away from taxing income, increase spending and save. Forty-two years of U.S. state-level data are consistent with this theory. Specifically, a baseline fixed effects model predicts that a 1% point increase in resource revenue results in a .20% point decrease in non-resource revenue, a .50% point increase in spending and a .30% point increase in savings. These results are generally robust to alternative model specifications and the instrumentation of resource-based government revenue. Interaction effects reveal some asymmetry in the fiscal response to revenue shocks according to state political leanings.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander James, 2014. "US State Fiscal Policy and Natural Resources," OxCarre Working Papers 126, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:126
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    File URL: http://www.oxcarre.ox.ac.uk/files/OxCarreRP2013126.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Ohad Raveh & Yaniv Reingewertz, 2015. "Heterogeneous Vertical Tax Externalities, Capital Mobility, and the Fiscal Advantage of Natural Resources," OxCarre Working Papers 160, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Badeeb, Ramez Abubakr & Lean, Hooi Hooi & Clark, Jeremy, 2017. "The evolution of the natural resource curse thesis: A critical literature survey," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 123-134.
    3. Richard Jaimes & Reyer Gerlagh, 2017. "Resource-Richness and Economic Growth in Contemporary U.S," CESifo Working Paper Series 6778, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Ohad Raveh, 2017. "Federal Tax Policies, Congressional Voting, and the Fiscal Advantage of Natural Resources," OxCarre Working Papers 182, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Kodjovi Mawulikplimi Eklou, 2016. "A Conditional Revenue Curse? Progressive Taxation and Resource Rents in Developing Countries," Cahiers de recherche 16-03, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    6. Fidel Perez-Sebastian & Ohad Raveh, 2017. "What Drives Vertical Fiscal Interactions? Evidence from the 1980 Crude Oil Windfall Act," OxCarre Working Papers 183, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. James, Alexander, 2016. "The long-run vanity of Prudhoe Bay," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 270-275.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Severance Tax; Fiscal Policy; Natural Resources;

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General

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