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Follow the Money: How Does the Income Flow After an Energy Boom

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  • Weinstein, Amanda
  • Partridge, Mark
  • Tsvetkova, Alexandra

Abstract

Many U.S. towns reportedly boomed after new technologies in oil and gas extraction, particularly improved hydraulic fracturing, led to rapid development of shale resources. Recent research on the expected economic impact focused on the employment multipliers associated with new oil and gas jobs. Instead, our focus is the impact of oil and gas industry growth on local earnings while paying attention to the distributional effects and assessing how much income seeps out due to the peculiarities of the industry. Our estimation results suggest that oil and gas earnings multipliers are relatively modest and mostly similar to oil and gas employment multipliers, with relatively large shares of the earnings leaving the county on average. Likewise, oil and gas multipliers tend to be smaller or comparable to the estimated multipliers for equal-sized shocks in the rest of the economy, suggesting that oil and gas is not a special industry case. Given the high wages in the sector and the large royalty payments that can go to landowners, these results may be surprising.

Suggested Citation

  • Weinstein, Amanda & Partridge, Mark & Tsvetkova, Alexandra, 2017. "Follow the Money: How Does the Income Flow After an Energy Boom," MPRA Paper 77336, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77336
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/77336/1/MPRA_paper_77336.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    shale revolution; energy boom; earnings multiplier; economic effects;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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