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A Decade of Natural Gas Development: The Makings of a Resource Curse?

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  • Weber, Jeremy G.

Abstract

Many studies find that areas more dependent on natural resources grow more slowly – a relationship known as the resource curse. For counties in the south-central U.S., I find little evidence of an emerging curse from greater natural gas production during the 2000s. Increases in population mitigated a rise in average compensation and crowding out of the non-mining sector. Each gas-related mining job created a little more than two jobs, indicating a neutral effect on resource dependence as measured by employment. Furthermore, changes in the adult population by education level reveal that greater production did not lead to a less educated population.

Suggested Citation

  • Weber, Jeremy G., 2013. "A Decade of Natural Gas Development: The Makings of a Resource Curse?," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150407, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150407
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Production Economics; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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