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Shale Gas Development and Property Values: Differences Across Drinking Water Sources

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  • Lucija Muehlenbachs
  • Elisheba Spiller
  • Christopher Timmins

Abstract

While shale gas development can result in rapid local economic development, negative externalities associated with the process may adversely affect the prices of nearby homes. We utilize a triple-difference estimator and exploit the public water service area boundary in Washington County, Pennsylvania to identify the housing capitalization of groundwater risk, differentiating it from other externalities, lease payments to homeowners, and local economic development. We find that proximity to wells increases housing values, though risks to groundwater fully offset those gains. By itself, groundwater risk reduces property values by up to 24 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucija Muehlenbachs & Elisheba Spiller & Christopher Timmins, 2012. "Shale Gas Development and Property Values: Differences Across Drinking Water Sources," Working Papers 12-14, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:12-14
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    Cited by:

    1. Zirogiannis, Nikolaos & Alcorn, Jessica & Piepenburg, Jayne & Rupp, John, 2015. "I Want In On That: Community-level Policies for Unconventional Gas Development in New York," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 44(2), August.
    2. Lipscomb, Clifford & Wang, Yongsheng & Kilpatrick, Sarah J., 2012. "Unconvensional Shale Gas Development and Real Estate Valuation Issues," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 42(2), pages 161-175, Summer.
    3. Virginia Di Nino & Ivan Faiella, 2013. "The �new� non-conventional hydrocarbons: the solution to the energy conundrum?," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 205, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Jeremy G. Weber & Jason Brown & John Pender, 2013. "Rural wealth creation and emerging energy industries: lease and royalty payments to farm households and businesses," Research Working Paper RWP 13-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    5. Delgado, Michael S. & Guilfoos, Todd & Boslett, Andrew, 2016. "The cost of unconventional gas extraction: A hedonic analysis," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-22.
    6. Catherine Hausman & Ryan Kellogg, 2015. "Welfare and Distributional Implications of Shale Gas," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(1 (Spring), pages 71-139.
    7. Koster, Hans R.A. & Ommeren, Jos van, 2015. "A shaky business: Natural gas extraction, earthquakes and house prices," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 120-139.
    8. Garg, Teevrat, 2014. "Public Health Effects of Natural Resource Degradation: Evidence from Indonesia," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169822, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Weber, Jeremy G., 2014. "A decade of natural gas development: The makings of a resource curse?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 168-183.
    10. Weber, Jeremy G. & Hitaj, Claudia, 2015. "What Can We Learn about Shale Gas Development from Land Values? Opportunities, Challenges, and Evidence from Texas and Pennsylvania," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(02), pages 40-58, August.
    11. Hans R.A. Koster & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2015. "Natural Gas Extraction, Earthquakes and House Prices," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-038/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. Jeremy G. Weber & J. Wesley Burnett & Irene M. Xiarchos, 2016. "Broadening Benefits from Natural Resource Extraction: Housing Values and Taxation of Natural Gas Wells as Property," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(3), pages 587-614, June.
    13. Farren, Michael D., 2014. "Boomtowns and the Nimbleness of the Housing Market: The Impact of Shale Oil and Gas Drilling on Local Housing Markets," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170644, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Dröes, Martijn I. & Koster, Hans R.A., 2016. "Renewable energy and negative externalities: The effect of wind turbines on house prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 121-141.
    15. Balthrop, Andrew T. & Hawley, Zackary, 2017. "I can hear my neighbors' fracking: The effect of natural gas production on housing values in Tarrant County, TX," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 351-362.
    16. repec:eee:jeeman:v:85:y:2017:i:c:p:205-227 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Jellicoe, Michaela & Delgado, Michael S., 2015. "Quantifying the Effects of Underground Natural Gas Storage on Nearby Residents," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 44(2), August.
    18. J. Scott Holladay & Jacob LaRiviere, 2015. "The Impact of Cheap Natural Gas on Marginal Emissions from Electricity Generation and Implications for Energy," Working Papers 2015-07, University of Tennessee, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    shale gas; property values; hedonic models; groundwater; triple difference estimator;

    JEL classification:

    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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