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John P. Tang

Personal Details

First Name:John
Middle Name:P.
Last Name:Tang
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pta205
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.johnptang.com
Twitter: @jp_tang
Terminal Degree:2007 Department of Economics; University of California-Berkeley (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) Research School of Economics
College of Business and Economics
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://rse.anu.edu.au/

: +61 2 6125 3807
+61 2 6125 0744
+61 2 6125 3807
RePEc:edi:eganuau (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Centre for Economic History (CEH)
Research School of Economics
College of Business and Economics
Australian National University

Canberra, Australia
http://rse.anu.edu.au/CEH/

: +61 2 6125 3807
+61 2 6125 0744
+61 2 6125 3807
RePEc:edi:chanuau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. David S. Jacks & John P. Tang, 2018. "Trade and Immigration, 1870-2010," NBER Working Papers 25010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Christopher M. Meissner & John P. Tang, 2017. "Upstart Industrialization and Exports, Japan 1880-1910," NBER Working Papers 23481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. SERGI BASCO & John P. Tang, 2017. "The Samurai Bond: Credit Supply And Economic Growth In Pre-War Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 05, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  4. John Tang, 2016. "A Tale of Two Sics: Japanese and American Industrialization in Historical Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 045, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  5. John Tang, 2016. "The engine and the reaper: The impact of industrialisation on mortality in early modern Japan," Working Papers 16015, Economic History Society.
  6. Dwight H. Perkins & John P. Tang, 2015. "East Asian Industrial Pioneers: Japan, Korea and Taiwan," CEH Discussion Papers 041, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  7. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Kazuki Onji & John P. Tang, 2015. "A nation without a corporate income tax: Evidence from nineteenth century Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 15-12, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  9. John Tang, 2014. "A tale of two SICs: industrial development in Japan and the United States in the late nineteenth century," Working Papers 14002, Economic History Society.
  10. John Tang, 2013. "Railroad expansion and entrepreneurship: evidence from Meiji Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 011, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  11. John P. Tang, 2010. "Pollution Havens and the Trade in Toxic Chemicals: Evidence from U.S. Trade Flows," Working Papers 10-12, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  12. John Tang, 2010. "Globalization and Price Dispersion: Evidence from U.S. Trade Flows," Working Papers 10-07, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  13. Randy Becker & John Tang, 2009. "U.S. Trade in Toxics: The Case of Chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)," Working Papers 09-29, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  14. John Tang, 2009. "Entrepreneurship and Japanese Industrialization in Historical Perspective," Working Papers 09-30, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  15. John Tang, 2008. "Financial Intermediation and Late Development: The Case of Meiji Japan, 1868 to 1912," Working Papers 08-01, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  16. John Tang, 2007. "Technological Leadership and Late Development: Evidence from Meiji Japan, 1868-1912," Working Papers 07-32r, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, revised May 2010.
  17. Bardhan, Ashok & Tang, John, 2006. "Occupational Diversification, Offshoring and Labor Market Volatility," MPRA Paper 3168, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Tang, John P., 2018. "Yokohama and the Silk Trade: How Eastern Japan Became the Primary Economic Region of Japan, 1843–1893. By Yasuhiro Makimura. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2017. Pp. xx, 255. $105, hardcover," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(03), pages 949-950, September.
  2. Onji, Kazuki & Tang, John P., 2017. "Taxes and the Choice of Organizational Form in Late Nineteenth Century Japan," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(02), pages 440-472, June.
  3. Tang, John P., 2017. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Late Nineteenth Century Japan," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 145-162.
  4. John P. Tang, 2016. "Regional Inequality and Industrial Structure in Japan: 1874-2008 , by Kyoji Fukao , Jean-Pascal Bassino , Tatsuji Makino , Ralph Papryzycki , Tokihiko Settsu , Masanori Takashima and Joji Tokui ( Maru," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(296), pages 141-143, March.
  5. Tang, John P., 2016. "The Company and the Shogun: The Dutch Encounter with Tokugawa Japan. By Adam Clulow. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014. xvi + 330 pp. Maps, illustrations, bibliography, notes, index. Cloth, $6," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 90(01), pages 181-184, March.
  6. John P. Tang, 2016. "A tale of two SICs: Japanese and American industrialisation in historical perspective," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(2), pages 174-197, July.
  7. Tang, John P., 2015. "Pollution havens and the trade in toxic chemicals: Evidence from U.S. trade flows," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 150-160.
  8. Tang, John P., 2014. "Railroad Expansion and Industrialization: Evidence from Meiji Japan," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 863-886, September.
  9. Tang, John, 2013. "Financial intermediation and late development in Meiji Japan, 1868 to 1912," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(02), pages 111-135, August.
  10. John P. Tang, 2011. "Technological leadership and late development: evidence from Meiji Japan, 1868–1912," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(s1), pages 99-116, February.
  11. Bardhan Ashok & Tang John, 2010. "What Kind of Job is Safer? A Note on Occupational Vulnerability," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Christopher M. Meissner & John P. Tang, 2017. "Upstart Industrialization and Exports, Japan 1880-1910," NBER Working Papers 23481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Jacopo Timini, 2018. "The margins of trade: market entry and sector spillovers, the case of Italy (1862-1913)," Working Papers 1836, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    2. Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2017. "East Asian Financial and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 23845, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. John Tang, 2016. "A Tale of Two Sics: Japanese and American Industrialization in Historical Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 045, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. OHYAMA Atsushi, 2017. "Industry Growth through Spinoffs and Startups," Discussion papers 17057, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

  3. Dwight H. Perkins & John P. Tang, 2015. "East Asian Industrial Pioneers: Japan, Korea and Taiwan," CEH Discussion Papers 041, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher M. Meissner & John P. Tang, 2017. "Upstart Industrialization and Exports, Japan 1880-1910," NBER Working Papers 23481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. SERGI BASCO & John P. Tang, 2017. "The Samurai Bond: Credit Supply And Economic Growth In Pre-War Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 05, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Gupta, Bishnupriya, 2018. "Falling Behind and Catching up: India’s Transition from a Colonial Economy," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 355, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).

  4. Kazuki Onji & John P. Tang, 2015. "A nation without a corporate income tax: Evidence from nineteenth century Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 15-12, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).

    Cited by:

    1. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

  5. John Tang, 2013. "Railroad expansion and entrepreneurship: evidence from Meiji Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 011, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    Cited by:

    1. Rui Manuel Pereira, Alfredo Marvao Pereira and William J. Hausman, 2017. "Railroad Infrastructure Investments and Economic Development in the Antebellum United States," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 42(3), pages 1-16, September.
    2. KOYAMA, Mark & MORIGUCHI, Chiaki & SNG, Tuan-Hwee, 2017. "Geopolitics and Asia’s Little Divergence: State Building in China and Japan After 1850," Discussion paper series HIAS-E-51, Hitotsubashi Institute for Advanced Study, Hitotsubashi University.

  6. John P. Tang, 2010. "Pollution Havens and the Trade in Toxic Chemicals: Evidence from U.S. Trade Flows," Working Papers 10-12, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cited by:

    1. Balsalobre-Lorente, Daniel & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Roubaud, David & Farhani, Sahbi, 2018. "How economic growth, renewable electricity and natural resources contribute to CO2 emissions?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 356-367.
    2. James R. Markusen, 2013. "Per-capita Income as a Determinant of International Trade and Environmental Policies," NBER Working Papers 19754, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Löschel, Andreas & Rexhäuser, Sascha & Schymura, Michael, 2013. "Trade and the environment: An application of the WIOD database," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-005, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. James R. Markusen, 2014. "Per-Capital Income as a Determinant of International Trade and Environment Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 4618, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Fozia Latif Gill & K Kuperan Viswanathan & Mohd Zaini Abdul Karim, 2018. "The Critical Review of the Pollution Haven Hypothesis (PHH)," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 8(1), pages 167-174.
    6. Zhang, Zengkai & Zhu, Kunfu & Hewings, Geoffrey J.D., 2017. "A multi-regional input–output analysis of the pollution haven hypothesis from the perspective of global production fragmentation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 13-23.

  7. John Tang, 2010. "Globalization and Price Dispersion: Evidence from U.S. Trade Flows," Working Papers 10-07, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cited by:

    1. John P. Tang, 2015. "Pollution Havens and the Trade in Toxic Chemicals: Evidence from U.S. Trade Flows," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2015-623, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

  8. John Tang, 2008. "Financial Intermediation and Late Development: The Case of Meiji Japan, 1868 to 1912," Working Papers 08-01, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cited by:

    1. John Tang, 2016. "A Tale of Two Sics: Japanese and American Industrialization in Historical Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 045, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Kazuki Onji & John P. Tang, 2015. "A nation without a corporate income tax: Evidence from nineteenth century Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 040, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. SERGI BASCO & John P. Tang, 2017. "The Samurai Bond: Credit Supply And Economic Growth In Pre-War Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 05, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

  9. John Tang, 2007. "Technological Leadership and Late Development: Evidence from Meiji Japan, 1868-1912," Working Papers 07-32r, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, revised May 2010.

    Cited by:

    1. John Tang, 2016. "A Tale of Two Sics: Japanese and American Industrialization in Historical Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 045, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Kazuki Onji & John P. Tang, 2015. "A nation without a corporate income tax: Evidence from nineteenth century Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 040, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Morck, Randall & Nakamura, Masao, 2018. "Japan's ultimately unaccursed natural resources-financed industrialization," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 32-54.
    4. Tang, John P., 2015. "The Engine And The Reaper: Industrialization And Mortality In Early Modern Japan," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-10, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Tomoko Hashino & Keijiro Otsuka, 2013. "Hand looms, power looms, and changing production organizations: the case of the Kiryū weaving district in early twentieth-century Japan," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(3), pages 785-804, August.
    6. John Tang, 2013. "Railroad expansion and entrepreneurship: evidence from Meiji Japan," CEH Discussion Papers 011, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    7. Nicholas, Tom, 2011. "The origins of Japanese technological modernization," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 272-291, April.
    8. John Tang, 2016. "The engine and the reaper: The impact of industrialisation on mortality in early modern Japan," Working Papers 16015, Economic History Society.

  10. Bardhan, Ashok & Tang, John, 2006. "Occupational Diversification, Offshoring and Labor Market Volatility," MPRA Paper 3168, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Rémi Bazillier & Cristina Boboc & Oana Calavrezo, 2014. "Employment vulnerability in Europe: Is there a migration effect?," Working Papers halshs-01203755, HAL.
    2. Carmen UZLAU & Mariana BALAN & Corina-Maria ENE, 2017. "Labour Market Vulnerabilities In Romania During The Post- Crisis Period," Internal Auditing and Risk Management, Athenaeum University of Bucharest, vol. 46(2), pages 12-27, June.

Articles

  1. John P. Tang, 2016. "A tale of two SICs: Japanese and American industrialisation in historical perspective," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(2), pages 174-197, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Tang, John P., 2015. "Pollution havens and the trade in toxic chemicals: Evidence from U.S. trade flows," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 150-160.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Tang, John P., 2014. "Railroad Expansion and Industrialization: Evidence from Meiji Japan," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 863-886, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Junichi Yamasaki, 2017. "Railroads, Technology Adoption, and Modern Economic Development: Evidence from Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 1000, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. Maravall Buckwalter, Laura, 2018. "Build It, and They Will Come? Secondary Railways and Population Density in French Algeria," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH 26738, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    3. John Tang, 2016. "A Tale of Two Sics: Japanese and American Industrialization in Historical Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 045, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Christopher M. Meissner & John P. Tang, 2017. "Upstart Industrialization and Exports, Japan 1880-1910," NBER Working Papers 23481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Johnson, Noel D. & Koyama, Mark, 2017. "States and economic growth: Capacity and constraints," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-20.
    6. Xu, Hangtian, 2016. "Domestic railroad infrastructure and exports: Evidence from the Silk Route," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 129-147.
    7. Konstantin Buechel, Stephan Kyburz, 2016. "Fast Track to Growth? The Impact of Railway Access on Regional Economic Development in 19th Century Switzerland," Diskussionsschriften credresearchpaper12, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft - CRED.
    8. Laura Maravall Buckwalter, 2018. "Build it and they will come? Secondary railways and population density in French Algeria," Working Papers 18008, Economic History Society.
    9. Herranz-Loncán, Alfonso & Fourie, Johan, 2016. ""For the public benefit": Railways in the British Cape Colony," African Economic History Working Paper 30/2016, African Economic History Network.
    10. Li, Zhigang & Xu, Hangtian, 2016. "High-Speed Railroad and Economic Geography: Evidence from Japan," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 485, Asian Development Bank.

  4. Tang, John, 2013. "Financial intermediation and late development in Meiji Japan, 1868 to 1912," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(02), pages 111-135, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. John P. Tang, 2011. "Technological leadership and late development: evidence from Meiji Japan, 1868–1912," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(s1), pages 99-116, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Bardhan Ashok & Tang John, 2010. "What Kind of Job is Safer? A Note on Occupational Vulnerability," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 18 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (12) 2008-02-16 2009-10-17 2013-05-05 2015-05-30 2015-09-11 2015-11-21 2016-02-12 2016-02-12 2017-06-04 2017-06-11 2017-07-02 2018-10-01. Author is listed
  2. NEP-INT: International Trade (6) 2010-03-28 2010-07-03 2015-09-11 2017-06-04 2017-06-11 2018-10-01. Author is listed
  3. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (4) 2015-09-11 2017-06-04 2017-06-11 2018-10-01
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (3) 2007-05-19 2010-03-28 2013-05-05
  5. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (3) 2009-10-03 2010-07-03 2015-09-11
  6. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (3) 2015-11-21 2016-02-12 2017-07-02
  7. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2007-05-19 2015-11-21 2016-02-12
  8. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (2) 2009-10-17 2013-05-05
  9. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (2) 2015-05-30 2015-09-11
  10. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (1) 2015-09-11
  11. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2008-02-16
  12. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2013-05-05
  13. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2017-06-04
  14. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2017-07-02
  15. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2017-07-02
  16. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (1) 2010-03-28
  17. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2015-09-11
  18. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2009-10-03
  19. NEP-RES: Resource Economics (1) 2015-09-11
  20. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (1) 2009-10-17
  21. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (1) 2013-05-05
  22. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-05-05

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