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Ricardo Perez-Truglia

Personal Details

First Name:Ricardo
Middle Name:
Last Name:Perez-Truglia
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppr99
http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/perez-truglia
110 Westwood Plaza Office C515 Los Angeles, California 90095
Terminal Degree:2014 Department of Economics; Harvard University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(90%) Anderson Graduate School of Management
University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA)

Los Angeles, California (United States)
http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/

:

110 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA. 90095
RePEc:edi:aguclus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.nber.org/

: 617-868-3900

1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
RePEc:edi:nberrus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Departamento de Economía
Universidad de San Andrés

Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://www.udesa.edu.ar/departamento-de-economia

: +5411-4725-7000
+5411-4725-7010
Vito Dumas 284, Victoria, Buenos Aires, B1644BID
RePEc:edi:desanar (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Marcelo L. Bérgolo & Rodrigo Ceni & Guillermo Cruces & Matias Giaccobasso & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Tax Audits as Scarecrows: Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23631, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Andres Drenik & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Sympathy for the Diligent and the Demand for Workfare," NBER Working Papers 23659, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Nicolas L. Bottan & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Choosing Your Pond: Location Choices and Relative Income," NBER Working Papers 23615, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially-Biased Statistics: Household Inflation Perceptions and Expectations in Argentina," NBER Working Papers 22103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Inflation Expectations, Learning and Supermarket Prices: Evidence from Survey Experiments," Artefactual Field Experiments 00542, The Field Experiments Website.
  6. Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Ugo Troiano, 2015. "Shaming Tax Delinquents," NBER Working Papers 21264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2014. "Inflation Expectations, Learning and Supermarket Prices," NBER Working Papers 20576, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Sebastian Galiani & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2013. "School Management in Developing Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0147, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  9. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2011. "Biased Perceptions of Income Distribution and Preferences for Redistribution: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Rafael Di Tella & Ricardo Pérez-Truglia, 2010. "Conveniently Upset: Avoiding Altruism by Distorting Beliefs About Others," NBER Working Papers 16645, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2018. "Markets, trust and cultural biases: evidence from eBay," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 17-27.
  2. Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2018. "Political Conformity: Event-Study Evidence from the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(1), pages 14-28, March.
  3. Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Guillermo Cruces, 2017. "Partisan Interactions: Evidence from a Field Experiment in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1208-1243.
  4. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Inflation Expectations, Learning, and Supermarket Prices: Evidence from Survey Experiments," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 1-35, July.
  5. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially Biased Statistics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 47(1 (Spring), pages 59-108.
  6. Bottan, Nicolas L. & Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2015. "Losing my religion: The effects of religious scandals on religious participation and charitable giving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 106-119.
  7. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2015. "A Samuelsonian validation test for happiness data," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 74-83.
  8. Rafael Di Tella & Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Andres Babino & Mariano Sigman, 2015. "Conveniently Upset: Avoiding Altruism by Distorting Beliefs about Others' Altruism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(11), pages 3416-3442, November.
  9. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2013. "A test of the conspicuous–consumption model using subjective well-being data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 146-154.
  10. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez-Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2013. "Biased perceptions of income distribution and preferences for redistribution: Evidence from a survey experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 100-112.
  11. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2012. "On the causes and consequences of hedonic adaptation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1182-1192.
  12. Bottan, Nicolas Luis & Perez Truglia, Ricardo, 2011. "Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 224-236, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2011. "Biased Perceptions of Income Distribution and Preferences for Redistribution: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Biased Perceptions of Income Distribution and Preferences for Redistribution: Evidence from a Survey Experiment
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2011-05-27 23:13:19
    2. Información, percepciones, expectativas y resultados económicos (o de cómo el INDEC contribuye a reducir las demandas redistributivas)
      by Guillermo Cruces in Foco Económico on 2011-06-08 17:00:00

Working papers

  1. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially-Biased Statistics: Household Inflation Perceptions and Expectations in Argentina," NBER Working Papers 22103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Cavallo, 2017. "Are Online and Offline Prices Similar? Evidence from Large Multi-channel Retailers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(1), pages 283-303, January.
    2. Alberto Cavallo & Roberto Rigobon, 2016. "The Billion Prices Project: Using Online Prices for Measurement and Research," NBER Working Papers 22111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Inflation Expectations, Learning and Supermarket Prices: Evidence from Survey Experiments," Artefactual Field Experiments 00542, The Field Experiments Website.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefano DellaVigna & Devin Pope, 2016. "Predicting Experimental Results: Who Knows What?," NBER Working Papers 22566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Buchheim, Lukas & Link, Sebastian, 2017. "The Effect of Disaggregate Information on the Expectation Formation of Firms," Discussion Papers in Economics 41214, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    3. Alexis Grigorieff & Christopher Roth & Diego Ubfal, 2016. "Does Information Change Attitudes Towards Immigrants? Representative Evidence from Survey Experiments," Working Papers 590, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

  3. Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Ugo Troiano, 2015. "Shaming Tax Delinquents," NBER Working Papers 21264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Christoph Engel, 2016. "Experimental Criminal Law. A Survey of Contributions from Law, Economics and Criminology," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2016_07, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    2. Robert Dur & Ben Vollaard, 2013. "Salience of Law Enforcement: A Field Experiment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-007/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Biddle, Nicholas & Fels, Katja & Sinning, Mathias, 2017. "Behavioral Insights and Business Taxation: Evidence from Two Randomized Controlled Trials," IZA Discussion Papers 10795, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Musharraf Rasool Cyan & Antonios M. Koumpias & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2016. "The Effects of Media Campaigns on Individual Attitudes towards Tax Compliance; Quasi-experimental Evidence from Survey Data in Pakistan," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1609, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    5. Leonardo Bursztyn & Robert Jensen, 2017. "Social Image and Economic Behavior in the Field: Identifying, Understanding, and Shaping Social Pressure," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 131-153, September.
    6. Marcelo L. Bérgolo & Rodrigo Ceni & Guillermo Cruces & Matias Giaccobasso & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Tax Audits as Scarecrows: Evidence from a Large-Scale Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 23631, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ortega, Daniel & Scartascini, Carlos, 2015. "Don’t blame the Messenger. A Field Experiment on Delivery Methods for Increasing Tax Compliance," Research Department working papers 821, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.

  4. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2014. "Inflation Expectations, Learning and Supermarket Prices," NBER Working Papers 20576, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Cavallo, 2017. "Are Online and Offline Prices Similar? Evidence from Large Multi-channel Retailers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(1), pages 283-303, January.
    2. Sukudhew (Sukhdave) Singh, 2016. "Economic changes, inflation dynamics and policy responses: the Malaysian experience," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Inflation mechanisms, expectations and monetary policy, volume 89, pages 231-245 Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Naohito Abe & Yuko Ueno, 2016. "The Mechanism of Inflation Expectation Formation among Consumers," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 064, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Kuchler, Theresa & Zafar, Basit, 2015. "Personal Experiences and Expectations about Aggregate Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 9444, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Alberto Cavallo & Roberto Rigobon, 2016. "The Billion Prices Project: Using Online Prices for Measurement and Research," NBER Working Papers 22111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Olympia Bover, 2015. "Measuring expectations from household surveys: new results on subjective probabilities of future house prices," Working Papers 1535, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    7. Abe, Naohito & Ueno, Yuko, 2015. "Measuring Inflation Expectations: Consumers' Heterogeneity and Nonlinearity," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP15-5, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. George-Marios Angeletos & Chen Lian, 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics: Accommodating Frictions in Coordination," NBER Working Papers 22297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Koichiro Kamada & Jouchi Nakajima & Shusaku Nishiguchi, 2015. "Are Household Inflation Expectations Anchored in Japan?," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 15-E-8, Bank of Japan.
    10. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially-Biased Statistics: Household Inflation Perceptions and Expectations in Argentina," NBER Working Papers 22103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Xu, Yingying & Chang, Hsu-Ling & Lobonţ, Oana-Ramona & Su, Chi-Wei, 2016. "Modeling heterogeneous inflation expectations: empirical evidence from demographic data?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 153-163.
    12. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially Biased Statistics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 47(1 (Spring), pages 59-108.
    13. Abe, Naohito & Ueno, Yuko, 2016. "The Mechanism of Inflation Expectation Formation among Consumers," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP16-1, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

  5. Sebastian Galiani & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2013. "School Management in Developing Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0147, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

    Cited by:

    1. Amaro Da Costa Luz Carneiro,Pedro Manuel & Koussihouede,Oswald & Lahire,Nathalie & Meghir,Costas & Mommaerts,Corina, 2016. "School grants and education quality : experimental evidence from Senegal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7624, The World Bank.
    2. Eric A. Hanushek & Susanne Link & Ludger Wößmann, 2011. "Does School Autonomy Make Sense Everywhere? Panel Estimates from PISA," CESifo Working Paper Series 3648, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Costas Meghir & Corina Momaerts & Pedro Carneiro & Oswald Koussihouede & Nathalie Lahire, 2015. "Decentralizing Education Resources: School Grants in Senegal," Working Papers 1047, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    4. Pugatch, Todd & Schroeder, Elizabeth, 2014. "Teacher Pay and Student Performance: Evidence from the Gambian Hardship Allowance," IZA Discussion Papers 8621, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  6. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2011. "Biased Perceptions of Income Distribution and Preferences for Redistribution: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Aboozar Hadavand, 2017. "Misperceptions and mismeasurements: An analysis of subjective economic inequality," Working Papers 449, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. West, Martin R. & Woessmann, Ludger & Lergetporer, Philipp & Werner, Katharina, 2017. "How Information Affects Support for Education Spending: Evidence from Survey Experiments in Germany and the United States," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 314, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Andrew Dabalen & Rasyad Parinduri & Saumik Paul, "undated". "The Effects of the Intensity, Timing and Persistance of Personal History of Mobility on Support for Redistribution," Discussion Papers 13/10, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    4. Karadja, Mounir & Möllerström, Johanna & Seim, David, 2014. "Richer (and Holier) Than Thou? The Effect of Relative Income Improvements on Demand for Redistribution," Working Paper Series 1042, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    5. Javier Olivera, 2012. "Preferences for Redistribution in Europe," Working Papers 201225, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Ada Ferrer-i-carbonell & Ramos, X. (Xavier), 2012. "GINI DP 38: Inequality and Happiness: A Survey," GINI Discussion Papers 38, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    7. Martín Ardanaz & Ana Corbacho & Mauricio Ruiz-Vega, 2014. "Mind the Gap: Bridging the Perception and Reality of Crime Rates with Information," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6595, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Joan Costa-i-Font & Frank Cowell, 2015. "European Identity and Redistributive Preferences," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 98, European Institute, LSE.
    9. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Xavier Ramos, 2014. "Inequality And Happiness," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 1016-1027, December.
    10. Eduardo Lora, 2013. "The Distance between Perception and Reality in the Social Domains of Life," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-423, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    11. Alvaro Forteza & Cecilia Noboa, 2015. "Tolerance to Tax Evasion," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1015, Department of Economics - dECON.
    12. Paolo Brunori, 2017. "The Perception of Inequality of Opportunity in Europe," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 464-491, September.
    13. Carina Engelhardt & Andreas Wagener, 2016. "What do Germans think and know about income inequality? A survey experiment," Working Papers 389, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    14. Doerrenberg, Philipp & Peichl, Andreas, 2017. "Tax morale and the role of social norms and reciprocity: Evidence from a randomized survey experiment," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-045, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    15. Kuhn, Andreas, 2015. "The Individual Perception of Wage Inequality: A Measurement Framework and Some Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 9579, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Poppitz, Philipp, 2017. "Can subjective data improve inequality measurement? A multidimensional index of economic inequality," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168252, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Tamas Hajdu & Gabor Hajdu, 2013. "Are more equal societies happier? Subjective well-being, income inequality, and redistribution," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1320, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    18. Alexandre Mas, 2017. "Does Transparency Lead to Pay Compression?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(5), pages 1683-1721.
    19. Torregrosa Hetland, Sara, 2017. "The political economy of peripheral tax reform : the Spanish fiscal transition," Lund Papers in Economic History 156, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    20. Erik Schokkaert & Tom Truyts, 2017. "Preferences for redistribution and social structure," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(3), pages 545-576, December.
    21. Roberto Antonietti & Francesco Farina & Fulvio Fontini, 2016. "A Rational Explanation for the Redistribution Paradox. Theory and Empirical Evidence," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 63(5), pages 539-555, November.
    22. Christopher Roth & Johannes Wohlfart, 2016. "Experienced Inequality and Preferences for Redistribution," CESifo Working Paper Series 6251, CESifo Group Munich.
    23. Vladimir Gimpelson & Daniel Treisman, 2015. "Misperceiving Inequality," NBER Working Papers 21174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Miquel Pellicer & Patrizio Piraino & Eva Wegner, 2014. "Information, mobilization, and demand for redistribution: A survey experiment in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 139, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    25. Becchetti, Leonardo & Castriota, Stefano & Corrado, Luisa & Ricca, Elena Giachin, 2013. "Beyond the Joneses: Inter-country income comparisons and happiness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 187-195.
    26. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2017. "Perceptions of Inequality," Working Papers 216, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    27. Alberto Montagnoli & Mirko Moro & Georgios A. Panos & Robert E. Wright, 2017. "Financial Literacy and Attitudes to Redistribution," Working Papers 2017007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    28. Diermeier, Matthias & Goecke, Henry & Niehues, Judith & Thomas, Tobias, 2017. "Impact of inequality-related media coverage on the concerns of the citzens," DICE Discussion Papers 258, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    29. Andreas Kuhn, 2016. "The Subversive Nature of Inequality: Subjective Inequality Perceptions and Attitudes to Social Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 6023, CESifo Group Munich.
    30. Markus Knell & Helmut Stix, 2017. "Inequality, Perception Biases and Trust," Working Papers 211, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    31. Javier Olivera, 2014. "Preferences for redistribution after the economic crisis," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 137-145.
    32. Köllner, Sebastian & Gründler, Klaus, 2016. "Determinants of Governmental Redistribution: Income Distribution, Development Levels, and the Role of Perceptions," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145619, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    33. Philipp Poppitz, 2016. "Does self-perceptions and income inequality match?," IMK Working Paper 173-2016, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    34. Philipp Lergetporer & Guido Schwerdt & Katharina Werner & Ludger Woessmann, 2016. "Information and Preferences for Public Spending: Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2016-07, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    35. Elisabeth Bublitz, 2017. "Misperceptions of income distributions: Cross-country evidence from a randomized survey experiment," LIS Working papers 694, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    36. Carina Engelhardt & Andreas Wagener, 2014. "Biased Perceptions of Income Inequality and Redistribution," CESifo Working Paper Series 4838, CESifo Group Munich.
    37. Michael I. Norton & Dan Ariely, 2013. "American's desire for less wealth inequality does not depend on how you ask them," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 8(3), pages 393-394, May.
    38. Philipp Lergetporer & Marc Piopiunik & Lisa Simon, 2017. "Do Natives' Beliefs About Refugees' Education Level Affect Attitudes Toward Refugees? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments," CESifo Working Paper Series 6832, CESifo Group Munich.
    39. R. Andrew Luccasen & M. Kathleen Thomas & Philip J. Grossman, 2017. "Giving to poverty relief charities: the impact of beliefs and misperceptions toward income redistribution in a real donation experiment," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 49(2), pages 387-409, August.
    40. Ilyana Kuziemko & Michael I. Norton & Emmanuel Saez & Stefanie Stantcheva, 2015. "How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(4), pages 1478-1508, April.
    41. Patricia Justino & Bruno Martorano, 2016. "Inequality, Distributive Beliefs and Protests: A Recent Story from Latin America," Working Papers - Economics wp2016_06.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    42. William J. Matthews & Ana I. Gheorghiu & Mitchell J. Callan, 2016. "Why do we overestimate others' willingness to pay?," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 11(1), pages 21-39, January.
    43. Hajdu, Tamás & Hajdu, Gábor, 2014. "Reduction of income inequality and subjective well-being in Europe," Economics Discussion Papers 2014-22, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    44. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2011. "Biased Perceptions of Income Distribution and Preferences for Redistribution: Evidence from a Survey Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    45. Bucciol, Alessandro & Cavasso, Barbara & Zarri, Luca, 2015. "Social status and personality traits," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 245-260.
    46. Yamamura, Eiji & Ishida, Ryo, 2017. "Analysis of the implementation of information disclosure ordinances in Japan: the effect on the income of mayors and chief executives in local governments," MPRA Paper 83337, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    47. Luna Bellani & Heinrich Ursprung, 2016. "The Political Economy of Redistribution Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 6189, CESifo Group Munich.
    48. Jakobsson, Niklas & Kotsadam, Andreas & Syse, Astri & Øien, Henning, 2016. "Gender bias in public long-term care? A survey experiment among care managers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PB), pages 126-138.
    49. Kuhn, Andreas, 2015. "The Subversive Nature of Inequality: Subjective Inequality Perceptions and Attitudes to Social Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 9406, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    50. Germán Reyes & Leonardo Gasparini, 2017. "Perceptions of Distributive Justice in Latin America During a Period of Falling Inequality," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0209, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    51. Lionel Page & Daniel G. Goldstein, 2016. "Subjective beliefs about the income distribution and preferences for redistribution," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(1), pages 25-61, June.

Articles

  1. Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Guillermo Cruces, 2017. "Partisan Interactions: Evidence from a Field Experiment in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1208-1243.

    Cited by:

    1. M. Keith Chen & Ryne Rohla, 2017. "Politics Gets Personal: Effects of Political Partisanship and Advertising on Family Ties," Papers 1711.10602, arXiv.org.

  2. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2017. "Inflation Expectations, Learning, and Supermarket Prices: Evidence from Survey Experiments," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 1-35, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Learning from Potentially Biased Statistics," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 47(1 (Spring), pages 59-108.

    Cited by:

    1. David R Baqaee, 2014. "Asymmetric In?ation Expectations, Downward Rigidity of Wages,and Asymmetric Business Cycles," Working Paper 139681, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    2. Alberto Cavallo & Guillermo Cruces & Ricardo Perez-Truglia, 2016. "Inflation Expectations, Learning and Supermarket Prices: Evidence from Survey Experiments," Artefactual Field Experiments 00542, The Field Experiments Website.

  4. Bottan, Nicolas L. & Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2015. "Losing my religion: The effects of religious scandals on religious participation and charitable giving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 106-119.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel M. Hungerman & Kevin J. Rinz & Jay Frymark, 2017. "Beyond the Classroom: The Implications of School Vouchers for Church Finances," NBER Working Papers 23159, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Daniel M. Hungerman & Kevin Rinz & Tim Weninger & Chungeun Yoon, 2018. "Political Campaigns and Church Contributions," NBER Working Papers 24374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Paul Missios & Ida Ferrara, 2015. "Trust, Ability-to-Pay, and Charitable Giving," Working Papers 061, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    4. Bittschi, Benjamin & Borgloh, Sarah & Wigger, Berthold U., 2016. "Philanthropy in a secular society," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-021, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Gharad T. Bryan & James J. Choi & Dean Karlan, 2018. "Randomizing Religion: The Impact of Protestant Evangelism on Economic Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 24278, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Tommaso Giommoni, 2017. "Exposition to Corruption and Political Participation: Evidence from Italian Municipalities," CESifo Working Paper Series 6645, CESifo Group Munich.

  5. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2015. "A Samuelsonian validation test for happiness data," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 74-83.

    Cited by:

    1. Ng, Sor Tho & Tey, Nai Peng & Asadullah, Niaz, 2017. "What Matters for Life Satisfaction among the Oldest-Old? Evidence from China," IZA Discussion Papers 10624, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Ward, George, 2015. "Is happiness a predictor of election results?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 61698, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2012. "What Do You Think Would Make You Happier? What Do You Think You Would Choose?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2083-2110, August.
    4. De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel & Ward, George W. & de Keulenaer, Femke & van Landeghem, Bert & Kavetsos, Georgios & Norton, Michael I., 2014. "The asymmetric experience of positive and negative economic growth: global evidence using subjective well-being data," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60054, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Clark, Andrew E. & Senik, Claudia & Yamada, Katsunori, 2017. "When experienced and decision utility concur: The case of income comparisons," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1-9.
    6. Akay, Alpaslan & Bargain, Olivier & Jara, Xavier, 2017. "'Fair' Welfare Comparisons with Heterogeneous Tastes: Subjective versus Revealed Preferences," IZA Discussion Papers 10908, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. George Ward, 2015. "Is Happiness a Predictor of Election Results?," CEP Discussion Papers dp1343, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2013. "A test of the conspicuous–consumption model using subjective well-being data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 146-154.
    9. Bottan, Nicolas Luis & Perez Truglia, Ricardo, 2011. "Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 224-236, May.
    10. Akay, Alpaslan & Bargain, Olivier & Jara, Xavier, 2017. "Back to Bentham, Should We? Large-Scale Comparison of Experienced versus Decision Utility," IZA Discussion Papers 10907, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Daniel J. Benjamin & Ori Heffetz & Miles S. Kimball & Alex Rees-Jones, 2010. "Do People Seek to Maximize Happiness? Evidence from New Surveys," NBER Working Papers 16489, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Matthew D. Adler & Paul Dolan & Georgios Kavetsos, 2015. "Would You Choose to be Happy? Tradeoffs between Happiness and the Other Dimensions of Life in a Large Population Survey," CEP Discussion Papers dp1366, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Akay, Alpaslan & Bargain, Olivier B. & Jara, H. Xavier, 2017. "Back to Bentham, Should We? Large-Scale Comparison of Experienced versus Decision Utility," GLO Discussion Paper Series 52, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

  6. Rafael Di Tella & Ricardo Perez-Truglia & Andres Babino & Mariano Sigman, 2015. "Conveniently Upset: Avoiding Altruism by Distorting Beliefs about Others' Altruism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(11), pages 3416-3442, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Nadine Chlass & Peter G. Moffatt, 2017. "Giving in dictator games: Experimenter demand effect or preference over the rules of the game?," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 17-05, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    2. Peter Schwardmann & Joël van der Weele, 2016. "Deception and Self-Deception," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-012/I, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Grimm, Stefan & Klimm, Felix, 2018. "Blaming the Refugees? Experimental Evidence On Responsibility Attribution," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 83, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    4. Grimm, Stefan & Klimm, Felix, 2018. "Blaming the Refugees? Experimental Evidence on Responsibility Attribution," Discussion Papers in Economics 42657, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    5. Konow, James & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Akai, Kenju, 2016. "Equity versus Equality," MPRA Paper 75376, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Alexis Grigorieff & Christopher Roth & Diego Ubfal, 2016. "Does Information Change Attitudes Towards Immigrants? Representative Evidence from Survey Experiments," Working Papers 590, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    7. Cortés, Darwin & Santamaría, Julieth & Vargas, Juan, 2016. "Economic Shocks and Crime: Evidence from the Crash of Ponzi Schemes," Research Department working papers 843, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
    8. Zhuoqiong (Charlie) Chen & Tobias Gesche, 2016. "Persistent bias in advice-giving," ECON - Working Papers 228, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Oct 2017.
    9. Francesca Gino & Michael I. Norton & Roberto A. Weber, 2016. "Motivated Bayesians: Feeling Moral While Acting Egoistically," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 189-212, Summer.
    10. Schwardmann, Peter & van der Weele, Joel, 2017. "Deception and Self-Deception," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 25, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    11. Christine L. Exley & Judd Kessler, 2017. "The Better is the Enemy of the Good," Working Papers 2017-068, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

  7. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2013. "A test of the conspicuous–consumption model using subjective well-being data," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 146-154.

    Cited by:

    1. Jinkins, David, 2014. "Conspicuous Consumption in the United States and China," IZA Discussion Papers 8323, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Luca Stanca & Ruut Veenhoven, 2015. "Consumption and happiness: an introduction," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(2), pages 91-99, June.
    3. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2015. "A Samuelsonian validation test for happiness data," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 74-83.
    4. Friedrichsen, Jana, 2018. "Signals Sell: Product Lines when Consumers Differ Both in Taste for Quality and Image Concern," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 70, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    5. Odermatt, Reto & Stutzer, Alois, 2017. "Subjective Well-Being and Public Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 11102, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2015. "Does consuming more make you happier? Evidence from Chinese panel data," BOFIT Discussion Papers 21/2015, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    7. Heinz-Herbert Noll & Stefan Weick, 2015. "Consumption expenditures and subjective well-being: empirical evidence from Germany," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 62(2), pages 101-119, June.

  8. Cruces, Guillermo & Perez-Truglia, Ricardo & Tetaz, Martin, 2013. "Biased perceptions of income distribution and preferences for redistribution: Evidence from a survey experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 100-112.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  9. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2012. "On the causes and consequences of hedonic adaptation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1182-1192.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Aronsson & Ronnie Schöb, 2014. "Climate Change and Psychological Adaptation: A Behavioral Environmental Economics Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 4795, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2012. "Resilience to economic shocks and the long reach of childhood bullying," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51520, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Emmerling, Johannes & Qari, Salmai, 2017. "Car ownership and hedonic adaptation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 29-38.
    4. Pablo Gluzmann, 2013. "Bienestar subjetivo y crecimiento económico: analizando la paradoja del crecimiento infeliz en la Encuesta Mundial Gallup," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0152, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    5. Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2014. "What childhood characteristics predict psychological resilience to economic shocks in adulthood?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 84-101.

  10. Bottan, Nicolas Luis & Perez Truglia, Ricardo, 2011. "Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 224-236, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2012. "On the causes and consequences of hedonic adaptation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1182-1192.
    2. Tapas MISHRA & Mamata PARHI & Claude DIEBOLT, 2014. "Evolutionary efficiency and distributive effects of inertia in cross-country life-satisfaction," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 49, pages 1335-1356, Août.
    3. AYLLON Sara & FUSCO Alessio, 2016. "Are income poverty and perceptions of financial difficulties dynamically interrelated?," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-05, LISER.
    4. Piper, Alan T., 2013. "Happiness, Dynamics and Adaptation," MPRA Paper 52342, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Zheng Fang, 2017. "Panel Quantile Regressions and the Subjective Well-Being in Urban China: Evidence from RUMiC Data," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 11-24, May.
    6. Piper, Alan T., 2014. "Zukunftsangst! Fear of (and hope for) the future and its impact on life satisfaction," MPRA Paper 59557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Beja Jr., Edsel, 2013. "Does economic prosperity bring about a happier society? Empirical remarks on the Easterlin Paradox debate," MPRA Paper 49446, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Edsel Beja, 2014. "Income growth and happiness: reassessment of the Easterlin Paradox," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 61(4), pages 329-346, December.
    9. Wunder, Christoph, 2012. "Does subjective well-being dynamically adjust to circumstances?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 750-752.
    10. Piper, Alan T., 2012. "Dynamic Analysis and the Economics of Happiness: Rationale, Results and Rules," MPRA Paper 43248, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Dec 2012.
    11. Paweł Chrostek, 2016. "An Empirical Investigation into the Determinants and Persistence of Happiness and Life Evaluation," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 413-430, February.
    12. Alessio Fusco, 2016. "The Dynamics of Perceived Financial Difficulties," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 1599-1614, August.
    13. Chrostek, Pawel, 2013. "An empirical investigation into the determinants and persistence of happiness and life evaluation," MPRA Paper 50442, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Piper, Alan T., 2014. "The Benefits, Challenges and Insights of a Dynamic Panel assessment of Life Satisfaction," MPRA Paper 59556, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. HASAN, HAMID & Khan, Hayat, 2013. "Testing the Existence of Hedonic Adaptation and Inertia to Income with implications for Islamic economics: a case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 44927, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Alex Coad & Martin Binder, 2014. "Causal Linkages between Work and Life Satisfaction and Their Determinants in a Structural VAR Approach," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_809, Levy Economics Institute.
    17. Chrostek, Pawel, 2013. "An empirical investigation into the determinants and persistence of different types of subjective well-being," MPRA Paper 48292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Miles Kimball & Ryan Nunn & Dan Silverman, 2015. "Accounting for Adaptation in the Economics of Happiness," NBER Working Papers 21365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Paul Frijters & David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields, 2014. "Does Childhood Predict Adult Life Satisfaction? Evidence from British Cohort Surveys," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 688-719, November.
    20. Piper, Alan T., 2014. "An Investigation into Happiness, Dynamics and Adaptation," MPRA Paper 57778, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Hamid Hasan, 2016. "Does Happiness Adapt to Increase in Income? Evidence from Pakistan Socio-economic Survey (1998-2001)," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 55(2), pages 113-122.
    22. Alan Piper, 2018. "Adult life satisfaction largely (though not wholly) contemporaneous," Discussion Papers 028, Europa-Universität Flensburg, International Institute of Management.
    23. Martin Binder & Felix Ward, 2011. "The Structure of Happiness: A Vector Autoregressive Approach," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    24. André Hajek, 2013. "Endogeneity in the Relation between Poverty, Wealth and Life Satisfaction," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 604, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    25. Beja Jr., Edsel, 2014. "Income growth and happiness: Reassessment of the Easterlin Paradox," MPRA Paper 53360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. Beja Jr., Edsel, 2013. "Does economic prosperity bring about a happier society? Empirical remarks on the Easterlin Paradox debate sans Happiness Adaptation," MPRA Paper 50633, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    27. Tapas Mishra & Mamata Parhi & Raúl Fuentes, 2015. "How Interdependent are Cross-Country Happiness Dynamics?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 491-518, June.

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 10 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (7) 2011-01-16 2011-05-24 2013-09-24 2014-12-13 2015-06-20 2016-10-09 2017-08-06. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (2) 2011-05-24 2017-08-06
  3. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (2) 2015-06-20 2017-08-06
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2014-12-13 2016-04-04
  5. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (2) 2016-04-04 2016-10-09
  6. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (2) 2015-06-20 2017-08-06
  7. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (1) 2017-08-06
  8. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2011-05-24
  9. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2013-09-24
  10. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2013-09-24
  11. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2017-08-13
  12. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (1) 2017-08-06
  13. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2011-05-24
  14. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2011-05-24
  15. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2017-08-06
  16. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-01-16
  17. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2017-08-06
  18. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-09-24

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