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Directed Technological Change in a post-Keynesian Ecological Macromodel

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  • Naqvi, Syed Ali Asjad

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  • Engelbert, Stockhammer

Abstract

This paper presents a post-Keynesian ecological macro model that combines three strands of literature: the directed technological change mechanism developed in mainstream endogenous growth theory models, the ecological economic literature which highlights the role of green innovation and material flows, and the post-Keynesian school which provides a framework to deal with the demand side of the economy, financial flows, and inter- and intra-sectoral behavioral interactions. The model is stock-flow consistent and introduces research and development (R&D) as a component of GDP funded by private firm investment and public expenditure. The economy uses three complimentary inputs - Labor, Capital, and (non-renewable) Resources. Input productivities depend on R&D expenditures, which are determined by relative changes in their respective prices. Two policy experiments are tested; a Resource tax increase, and an increase in the share of public R&D on Resources. Model results show that policy instruments that are continually increased over a long-time horizon have better chances of achieving a "green" transition than one-of climate policy shocks to the system, that primarily have a short-run affect.

Suggested Citation

  • Naqvi, Syed Ali Asjad & Engelbert, Stockhammer, 2017. "Directed Technological Change in a post-Keynesian Ecological Macromodel," Ecological Economic Papers 5809, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wus045:5809
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    Keywords

    directed technological change; research and development; green transition; ecological economics; post-Keynesian economics; stock-flow consistency;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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