IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/oxford/v27y2011i2p295-311.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Wage norms, capital accumulation, and unemployment: a post-Keynesian view

Author

Listed:
  • Engelbert Stockhammer

Abstract

The paper presents a post-Keynesian view of unemployment. It argues, first, that the effective labour demand need not be downward sloping with respect to real wages, and aggregate demand need not be downward sloping with respect to inflation; second, that there is a broad case for unemployment hysteresis, understood as endogeneity of the non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment (NAIRU), based on social norms in wage bargaining and on the supply-side effects of capital accumulation; and, third, that, much as Keynes argued, capital investment (rather than labour-market institutions) is the key variable to explain changes in aggregate unemployment performance across countries and over time. Overall, the paper advocates a Keynesian view of the NAIRU, where effective demand determines unemployment in the short run and the deviation of actual unemployment from the NAIRU determines the change in inflation. In the medium term the NAIRU is endogenous and follows actual unemployment. Copyright 2011, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Engelbert Stockhammer, 2011. "Wage norms, capital accumulation, and unemployment: a post-Keynesian view," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 295-311.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:27:y:2011:i:2:p:295-311
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oxrep/grr013
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stockhammer, Engelbert & Onaran, Ozlem, 2004. "Accumulation, distribution and employment: a structural VAR approach to a Kaleckian macro model," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 421-447, December.
    2. Engelbert Stockhammer & Özlem Onaran & Stefan Ederer, 2009. "Functional income distribution and aggregate demand in the Euro area," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 139-159, January.
    3. Arestis, Philip & Mariscal, Iris Biefang-Frisancho, 1998. "Capital shortages and asymmetries in UK unemployment," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 189-204, June.
    4. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2006. "Employment Patterns in OECD Countries: Reassessing the Role of Policies and Institutions," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 486, OECD Publishing.
    5. Eckhard Hein & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2010. "Macroeconomic Policy Mix, Employment and Inflation in a Post-Keynesian Alternative to the New Consensus Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 317-354.
    6. Olivier Blanchard, 2006. "European unemployment: the evolution of facts and ideas," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(45), pages 5-59, January.
    7. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
    8. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2008. "Distribution and growth reconsidered: empirical results for six OECD countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(3), pages 479-511, May.
    9. Rowthorn, R E, 1977. "Conflict, Inflation and Money," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(3), pages 215-239, September.
    10. Dean Baker & Andrew Glyn & David Howell & John Schmitt, 2002. "Labor Market Institutions and Unemployment: A Critical Assessment of the Cross-Country Evidence," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-17, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    11. Basil J. Moore, 1983. "Unpacking the Post Keynesian Black Box: Bank Lending and the Money Supply," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 537-556, July.
    12. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2005. "Aggregate demand, conflict and capacity in the inflationary process," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(6), pages 959-974, November.
    13. Skott, Peter, 2005. "Fairness as a source of hysteresis in employment and relative wages," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 305-331, July.
    14. Philip Arestis & Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal, 1997. "Conflict, Effort and Capital Stock in UK Wage Determination," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 179-193, October.
    15. Philip Arestis & Michelle Baddeley & Malcolm Sawyer, 2007. "The Relationship Between Capital Stock, Unemployment And Wages In Nine Emu Countries," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(2), pages 125-148, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    2. Engelbert Stockhammer & Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, 2014. "Rebalancing the Euro Area: The Costs of Internal Devaluation," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 210-233, April.
    3. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economic Papers 4564, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Bruno Damásio & Diogo Martins, 2017. "Do Labour Market Reforms Pay Off? Unemployment and Capital Accumulation in Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/01, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    5. Engelbert Stockhammer & Ozlem Onaran, 2013. "Wage-led growth: theory, evidence, policy," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 61-78, January.
    6. Paolo Piacentini, 2016. "The demand-side vs. the supply–side in the analysis of employment: the potentials for the use of “employment multipliers”," Working Papers 0023, ASTRIL - Associazione Studi e Ricerche Interdisciplinari sul Lavoro.
    7. Asjad Naqvi & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2017. "Directed technological change in a post-Keynesian ecological macromodel," Working Papers PKWP1714, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    8. Engelbert Stockhammer & Alexander Guschanski & Karsten Köhler, 2014. "Unemployment, capital accumulation and labour market institutions in the Great Recession," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 182-194, September.
    9. Ioanna C. Bardakas, 2016. "Structural and cyclical factors of Greece’s current account balances: a note," Working Papers 206, Bank of Greece.
    10. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics Papers ieep4, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    11. Nicos Christodoulakis & Christos Axioglou, 2016. "Underinvestment and unemployment: the double hazard in the euro area," Working Papers 205, Bank of Greece.
    12. António Afonso & André Albuquerque, 2017. "Sovereign Credit Rating Mismatches," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/02, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    13. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 111, WWWforEurope.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:27:y:2011:i:2:p:295-311. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/oxrep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.