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Global warming and technical change: Multiple steady-states and policy options

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  • Bondarev, Anton
  • Greiner, Alfred

Abstract

In this paper we develop an economic growth model that includes anthropogenicclimate change. We include a publicly funded research sector that creates new technologies and simultaneously expands the productivities of existing technologies. The environment is affected by R&D activities both negatively, through the increase of output from productivity growth, as well as positively as new technologies are less harmful for the environment. We find that there may exist two different steadystates of the economy, depending on the amount of research spending: one with less new technologies being developed and the other with more technologies. Thus, a lock-in effect may arise that, however, can be overcome by raising R&D spending sufficiently such that the steady-state becomes unique. We derive the combinations of fiscal policy instruments for which that can be achieved and we study the implications for the economy and for the environment. In particular, the double dividend hypothesis may hold only under some specific conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Bondarev, Anton & Greiner, Alfred, 2018. "Global warming and technical change: Multiple steady-states and policy options," Working papers 2018/03, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2018/03
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; doubly-differentiated R&D; double dividend; fiscal policy instruments; technology lock-in;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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