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The WITCH Model. Structure, Baseline, Solutions

Author

Listed:
  • Valentina Bosetti

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Emanuele Massetti

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Massimo Tavoni

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

Abstract

WITCH – World Induced Technical Change Hybrid – is a regionally disaggregated hard-link hybrid global model with a neoclassical optimal growth structure (top-down) and a detailed energy input component (bottom-up). The model endogenously accounts for technological change, both through learning curves that affect the prices of new vintages of capital and through R&D investments. The model features the main economic and environmental policies in each world region as the outcome of a dynamic game. WITCH belongs to the class of Integrated Assessment Models as it possesses a climate module that feeds climate changes back into the economy. Although the model’s main features are discussed elsewhere (Bosetti et al., 2006), here we provide a more thorough discussion of the model’s structure and baseline projections, to describe the model in greater detail. We report detailed information on the evolution of energy demand, technology and CO2 emissions. We also explain the procedure used to calibrate the model parameters. This report is therefore meant to provide effective support to those who intending to use the WITCH model or interpret its results.

Suggested Citation

  • Valentina Bosetti & Emanuele Massetti & Massimo Tavoni, 2007. "The WITCH Model. Structure, Baseline, Solutions," Working Papers 2007.10, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2007.10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate Policy; Hybrid Modelling; Integrated Assessment; Technological Change;

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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