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A Robust Strategy for Sustainable Energy

Author

Listed:
  • Klaus S. Lackner

    (Columbia University)

  • Jeffrey D. Sachs

    (Columbia University)

Abstract

The known energy resource base is more than sufficient to provide a growing world population with energy on the scale to which the industrial countries have grown accustomed and to which the developing countries aspire. Environmental constraints exist but have promising solutions, provided farsighted policies are adopted in timely fashion. We illustrate the scale of the problem using a simple numerical scenario of world energy demand over the next century and calculating the implied increase in carbon emissions and atmospheric carbon concentrations. We conclude that action is needed soon to keep carbon concentrations below 500 parts per million as of 2050 and that the cost of mitigation will be less than 1 percent of gross world product as of 2050, assuming today’s promising technologies prove successful, but also that additional novel mitigation technologies will need to be developed and adopted after 2050.

Suggested Citation

  • Klaus S. Lackner & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2005. "A Robust Strategy for Sustainable Energy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 36(2), pages 215-284.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:36:y:2005:i:2005-2:p:215-284
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    File URL: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2005/06/2005b_bpea_lackner.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tol, Richard S. J., 2005. "The marginal damage costs of carbon dioxide emissions: an assessment of the uncertainties," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(16), pages 2064-2074, November.
    2. Hidalgo, Ignacio & Szabo, Laszlo & Carlos Ciscar, Juan & Soria, Antonio, 2005. "Technological prospects and CO2 emission trading analyses in the iron and steel industry: A global model," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 583-610.
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    Cited by:

    1. Masih, A. Mansur M. & Albinali, Khaled & DeMello, Lurion, 2010. "Price dynamics of natural gas and the regional methanol markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1372-1378, March.
    2. Garth Heutel & Juan Moreno-Cruz & Katharine Ricke, 2016. "Climate Engineering Economics," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 99-118, October.
    3. Sebastiano Cupertino, 2013. "Cost-benefit analysis of carbon dioxide capture and storage considering the impact of two different climate change mitigation regimes," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(1), pages 73-89.
    4. Joarder Munim & Md. Hakim & Md. Abdullah-Al-Mamun, 2010. "Analysis of energy consumption and indicators of energy use in Bangladesh," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 275-302, November.
    5. Soren Lindner & Sonja Peterson & Wilhelm Windhorst, 2010. "An economic and environmental assessment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) power plants: a case study for the City of Kiel," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1069-1088.
    6. Anabela Botelho & Lina Sofia Lourenço-Gomes & Lígia Costa Pinto & Sara Sousa & Marieta Valente, 2016. "Accounting for local impacts of photovoltaic farms: two stated preferences approaches," NIMA Working Papers 64, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    7. Narita, Daiju, 2008. "The use of CCS in global carbon management: simulation with the DICE model," Kiel Working Papers 1440, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    8. Osmani, Atif & Zhang, Jun & Gonela, Vinay & Awudu, Iddrisu, 2013. "Electricity generation from renewables in the United States: Resource potential, current usage, technical status, challenges, strategies, policies, and future directions," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 454-472.
    9. Scott Barrett, 2009. "The Coming Global Climate-Technology Revolution," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 53-75, Spring.
    10. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:191-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Horner, Robert M. & Clark, Corrie E., 2013. "Characterizing variability and reducing uncertainty in estimates of solar land use energy intensity," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 129-137.
    12. Rappold, T.A. & Lackner, K.S., 2010. "Large scale disposal of waste sulfur: From sulfide fuels to sulfate sequestration," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1368-1380.
    13. Evans, Annette & Strezov, Vladimir & Evans, Tim J., 2009. "Assessment of sustainability indicators for renewable energy technologies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 1082-1088, June.
    14. Li, Kewen & Bian, Huiyuan & Liu, Changwei & Zhang, Danfeng & Yang, Yanan, 2015. "Comparison of geothermal with solar and wind power generation systems," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1464-1474.
    15. Narita, Daiju, 2009. "Economic optimality of CCS use: a resource-economic model," Kiel Working Papers 1508, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    16. Stokes, Leah C., 2013. "The politics of renewable energy policies: The case of feed-in tariffs in Ontario, Canada," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 490-500.
    17. Heitmann, Nadine & Bertram, Christine & Narita, Daiju, 2010. "Embedding CCS infrastructure into the European electricity system: A policy coordination problem," Kiel Working Papers 1657, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    18. Gregory F. Nemet and Adam R. Brandt, 2012. "Willingness to Pay for a Climate Backstop: Liquid Fuel Producers and Direct CO2 Air Capture," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    macroeconomics; Sustainable Energy;

    JEL classification:

    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects

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