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Finance and Synchronization

Author

Listed:
  • Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchi

    () (Bank of England
    Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM))

  • Jean Imbs

    () (Paris School of Economics
    Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR))

  • Jumana Saleheen

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

In the workhorse model of international real business cycles, financial integration exacerbates the cycle asymmetry created by country-specific supply shocks. The prediction is identical in response to purely common shocks in the same model augmented with simple country heterogeneity (e.g., where depreciation rates or factor shares are different across countries). This happens because common shocks have heterogeneous consequences on the marginal products of capital across countries, which triggers international investment. In the data, filtering out common shocks requires therefore allowing for country-specific loadings. We show that finance and synchronization correlate negatively in response to such common shocks, consistent with previous findings. But finance and synchronization correlate non-negatively, almost always positively, in response to purely country-specific shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchi & Jean Imbs & Jumana Saleheen, 2016. "Finance and Synchronization," Discussion Papers 1622, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
  • Handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1622
    as

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    File URL: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/Discussion-Papers/2016/CFMDP2016-22-Paper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hideaki Hirata & M. Ayhan Kose & Chris Otrok, "undated". "Regionalization vs. Globalization," Working Paper 164456, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    2. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Pericoli, Marcello & Sbracia, Massimo, 2005. "'Some contagion, some interdependence': More pitfalls in tests of financial contagion," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(8), pages 1177-1199, December.
    3. Domenico Giannone & Michele Lenza & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2010. "Business Cycles in the Euro Area," NBER Chapters,in: Europe and the Euro, pages 141-167 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Luca Dedola & Giovanni Lombardo, 2012. "Financial frictions, financial integration and the international propagation of shocks," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 27(70), pages 319-359, April.
    5. Eric Monnet & Damien Puy, 2016. "Has Globalization Really Increased Business Cycle Synchronization?," IMF Working Papers 16/54, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Gert Peersman & Frank Smets, 2005. "The Industry Effects of Monetary Policy in the Euro Area," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(503), pages 319-342, April.
    7. Lutz Kilian, 2008. "A Comparison of the Effects of Exogenous Oil Supply Shocks on Output and Inflation in the G7 Countries," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 6(1), pages 78-121, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mariarosaria Comunale, 2017. "Synchronicity of real and financial cycles and structural characteristics in EU countries," CEIS Research Paper 414, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 25 Sep 2017.
    2. Michael Stemmer, 2017. "Revisiting Finance and Growth in Transition Economies - A Panel Causality Approach," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01524462, HAL.
    3. repec:eee:jimfin:v:84:y:2018:i:c:p:42-57 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial linkages; Business cycles synchronization; Contagion; Common shocks; Idiosyncratic shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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