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Citations of

Etienne Lalé

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-Time Work," Sciences Po publications 2016-05, Sciences Po.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-Time Work
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2016-07-08 20:46:17
  2. Etienne Lalé, 2015. "Loss of Skill and Labor Market Fluctuations," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/668, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 18 Jan 2017.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Loss of Skill and Labor Market Fluctuations
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2015-12-09 14:52:10

Working papers

  1. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Sciences Po publications 2016-04, Sciences Po.

    Cited by:

    1. Lalé, Etienne, 2017. "Worker reallocation across occupations: Confronting data with theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 51-68.
    2. Daniel Borowcyzk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-time Work," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 16/673, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 12 Dec 2016.
    3. Lalé, Etienne, 2016. "The Evolution of Multiple Jobholding in the U.S. Labor Market: The Complete Picture of Gross Worker Flows," IZA Discussion Papers 10355, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. Dolado, Juan J. & Lalé, Etienne & Siassi, Nawid, 2016. "From Dual to Unified Employment Protection: Transition and Steady State," IZA Discussion Papers 9953, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Cahuc, Pierre & Charlot, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck & Benghalem, Helène & Limon, Emeline, 2016. "Taxation of Temporary Jobs: Good Intentions with Bad Outcomes?," IZA Discussion Papers 10352, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  3. François Bonnet & Etienne Lalé & Mirna Safi & Etienne Wasmer, 2015. "Better residential than ethnic discrimination!," Sciences Po publications 5, Sciences Po.

    Cited by:

    1. Mathieu Bunel & Yannick L 'Horty & Loïc Du Parquet & Pascale Petit, 2017. "Les Discriminations Dans L'Acces Au Logement A Paris : Une Experience Controlee," Working Papers halshs-01521995, HAL.

  4. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2015. "How Bad is Involuntary Part-time Work?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/664, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 13 Jan 2016.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2016-04, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    2. Daniel Borowcyzk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-time Work," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 16/673, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 12 Dec 2016.

  5. François Bonnet & Etienne Lalé & Mirna Safi & Etienne Wasmer, 2015. "Better residential than ethnic discrimination! : Reconciling audit's findings and interviews' findings in the Parisian housing market," Sciences Po publications 36, Sciences Po.

    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Gobillon & Matthieu Solignac, 2015. "Homeownership of immigrants in France: selection effects related to international migration flows," PSE Working Papers halshs-01233069, HAL.

  6. Etienne Lalé, 2015. "Worker Reallocation Across Occupations: Confronting Data with Theory," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/657, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 22 Oct 2016.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2016-04, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.

  7. Etienne Lalé, 2014. "Labor-market Frictions, Incomplete Insurance and Severance Payments," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/648, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 16 Aug 2016.

    Cited by:

    1. Dolado, Juan J. & Lalé, Etienne & Siassi, Nawid, 2016. "From Dual to Unified Employment Protection: Transition and Steady State," IZA Discussion Papers 9953, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  8. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2014. "Employment Adjustment and Part-time Jobs: The US and the UK in the Great Recession," Sciences Po publications 2014-17, Sciences Po.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2016-04, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    2. Valletta, Robert G. & Bengali, Leila & van der List, Catherine, 2015. "Cyclical and market determinants of involuntary part-time employment," Working Paper Series 2015-19, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    3. Carl Singleton, 2016. "Long-term unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK stocks and flows," ESE Discussion Papers 273, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    4. Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel & Lalé, Etienne, 2016. "How Bad Is Involuntary Part-time Work?," IZA Discussion Papers 9775, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Daniel Borowcyzk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-time Work," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 16/673, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 12 Dec 2016.
    6. Hélène Couprie & Xavier Joutard, 2017. "Atypical Employment and Prospects of the Youth on the Labor Market in a Crisis Context," THEMA Working Papers 2017-08, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    7. Fernandes, Ana P. & Ferreira, Priscila, 2017. "Financing constraints and fixed-term employment: Evidence from the 2008-9 financial crisis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 215-238.
    8. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2016. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK’s Great Recession," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.

  9. François Bonnet & Mirna Safi & Etienne Lalé & Etienne Wasmer, 2011. "À la recherche du locataire “idéal” : du droit aux pratiques en région parisienne," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/c8dmi8nm4pd, Sciences Po.

    Cited by:

    1. Ouazad, Amine, 2015. "Blockbusting: Brokers and the dynamics of segregation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 811-841.
    2. Mathieu Bunel & Samuel Gorohouna & Yannick L'Horty & Pascale Petit & Catherine Ris, 2016. "Discriminations ethniques dans l’accès au logement : une expérimentation en Nouvelle-Calédonie," TEPP Research Report 2016-08, TEPP.

Articles

  1. Lalé, Etienne, 2017. "Worker reallocation across occupations: Confronting data with theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 51-68.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Lalé, Etienne, 2012. "Trends in occupational mobility in France: 1982–2009," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 373-387.

    Cited by:

    1. Álvarez de Toledo, Pablo & Núñez, Fernando & Usabiaga, Carlos, 2013. "Labour Market Segmentation, Clusters, Mobility and Unemployment Duration with Individual Microdata," MPRA Paper 46003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bernd Fitzenberger & Stefanie Licklederer & Hanna Zwiener, 2015. "Mobility across Firms and Occupations among Graduates from Apprenticeship," Working Papers 2015005, Berlin Doctoral Program in Economics and Management Science (BDPEMS).
    3. Lalé, Etienne, 2017. "Worker reallocation across occupations: Confronting data with theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 51-68.
    4. Nuno Crespo & Nadia Simoes & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2014. "Gender differences in occupational mobility - evidence from Portugal," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 460-481, July.
    5. Carlos Usabiaga & Fernando Núñez & Pablo Álvarez de Toledo, 2013. "Segmentación del mercado de trabajo, clusters, movilidad y duración de desempleo con datos individuales," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2013/02, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    6. Álvarez de Toledo, Pablo & Núñez, Fernando & Usabiaga, Carlos, 2014. "An empirical approach on labour segmentation. Applications with individual duration data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 252-267.
    7. Barbara Mueller & Juerg Schweri, 2012. "The returns to occupation-specific human capital - Evidence from mobility after training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0081, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    8. By Barbara Mueller & Jürg Schweri, 2015. "How specific is apprenticeship training? Evidence from inter-firm and occupational mobility after graduation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1057-1077.

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