IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/wpaper/hal-01311976.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Rise of Part-time Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Borowczyk-Martins

    (ECON - Département d'économie - Sciences Po)

  • Etienne Lalé

    (ENSAE ParisTech - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique)

Abstract

We construct new monthly time series of U.S. labor market stocks and flows from 1976 onwards. These data reveal an upward secular trend in turnover between full-time and part-time employment, and a large cyclical component chiefly explained by fluctuations in involuntary part-time work. Both short-run and long-run reallocations occur mostly without an intervening spell of non-employment, and therefore cannot be uncovered without splitting employment into finer categories. We emphasize the importance of our findings for several active debates, such as the slowdown in U.S. labor-market dynamism, changes in job stability and security, and the assessment of labor-market slack.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Working Papers hal-01311976, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01311976 Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01311976
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01311976/document
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Sahin, Aysegl, 2009. "Why did the average duration of unemployment become so much longer?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 200-209.
    2. Jordi Galí & Thijs van Rens, 2008. "The vanishing procyclicality of labor productivity," Economics Working Papers 1230, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2010.
    3. Fujita, Shigeru, 2015. "Declining labor turnover and turbulence," Working Papers 15-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 02 Feb 2018.
    4. Henry Hyatt & James Spletzer, 2013. "The recent decline in employment dynamics," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), pages 1-21.
    5. Elsby, Michael W.L. & Hobijn, Bart & Şahin, Ayşegül, 2015. "On the importance of the participation margin for labor market fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 64-82.
    6. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John Haltiwanger, 2006. "The Flow Approach to Labor Markets: New Data Sources and Micro-Macro Links," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 3-26.
    7. Moscarini, Giuseppe & Thomsson, Kaj, 2006. "Occupational and Job Mobility in the US," Working Papers 19, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:12:p:3875-3916 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2015. "How Bad is Involuntary Part-time Work?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/664, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 13 Jan 2016.
    10. Shigeru Fujita & Giuseppe Moscarini, 2017. "Recall and Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 3875-3916.
    11. Robert G. Valletta & Leila Bengali, 2013. "What’s behind the increase in part-time work?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue aug26.
    12. Toshihiko Mukoyama, 2013. "The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity," International Finance Discussion Papers 1074, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    13. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2014. "Employment Adjustment and Part-time Jobs: The US and the UK in the Great Recession," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2014-17, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    14. Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Sahin, Aysegl, 2009. "Why did the average duration of unemployment become so much longer?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 200-209.
    15. Ohanian, Lee E. & Raffo, Andrea, 2012. "Aggregate hours worked in OECD countries: New measurement and implications for business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 40-56.
    16. Regis Barnichon & Andrew Figura, 2016. "Declining Desire to Work and Downward Trends in Unemployment and Participation," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 449-494.
    17. Lalé, Etienne, 2017. "Worker reallocation across occupations: Confronting data with theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 51-68.
    18. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2009. "The Cyclicality Of Separation And Job Finding Rates," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(2), pages 415-430, May.
    19. Valletta, Robert G. & van der List, Catherine, 2015. "Involuntary part-time work: here to stay?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    20. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew T. Levin, 2015. "Labor Market Slack and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 21094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Robert G. Valletta, 1999. "Recent research on job stability and security," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue jul23.
    22. Henry Hyatt & James Spletzer, 2013. "The recent decline in employment dynamics," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), pages 1-21.
    23. Hornstein, Andreas & Kudlyak, Marianna & Lange, Fabian, 2014. "Measuring Resource Utilization in the Labor Market," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 1Q, pages 1-21.
    24. Mukoyama, Toshihiko, 2014. "The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-17.
    25. Robert Shimer, 2012. "Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 127-148, April.
    26. Tomaz Cajner & Dennis Mawhirter & Christopher J. Nekarda & David Ratner, 2014. "Why is Involuntary Part-Time Work Elevated?," FEDS Notes 2014-04-14, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    27. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John Haltiwanger, 2006. "The Flow Approach to Labor Markets: New Data Sources and Micro-Macro Links," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 3-26.
    28. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The cyclicality of hires, separations, and job-to-job transitions," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 493-508.
    29. Canon, Maria E. & Kudlyak, Marianna & Luo, Guannan & Reed, Marisa, 2014. "Flows To and From Working Part Time for Economic Reasons and the Labor Market Aggregates During and After the 2007-09 Recession," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 2Q, pages 87-111.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lalé, Etienne, 2017. "Worker reallocation across occupations: Confronting data with theory," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 51-68.
    2. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Welfare Effects of Involuntary Part-Time Work," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2016-05, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
    3. Lalé, Etienne, 2016. "The Evolution of Multiple Jobholding in the U.S. Labor Market: The Complete Picture of Gross Worker Flows," IZA Discussion Papers 10355, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Part-time work; Labor market flows; Secular trends; Business cycles;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01311976. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CCSD). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.