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The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity

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  • Toshihiko Mukoyama

Abstract

This paper analyzes the job-to-job transitions of workers in the United States. I propose a new method of correcting the time-aggregation bias. The bias-corrected series from 1996 to 2011 reveals a procyclical pattern of job-to-job transition and a large decline since the beginning of the 2000s. I construct a model of on-the-job search and explore the implications of this phenomenon. The calibrated model shows that the decline in the reallocation of workers through job-to-job transitions has had a substantial effct on total factor productivity (TFP). From 2009 to 2011, the model accounts for about 0.5%-0.7% annual decline in TFP.

Suggested Citation

  • Toshihiko Mukoyama, 2013. "The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity," International Finance Discussion Papers 1074, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1074
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Melissa Bjelland & Bruce Fallick & John Haltiwanger & Erika McEntarfer, 2011. "Employer-to-Employer Flows in the United States: Estimates Using Linked Employer-Employee Data," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 493-505.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mukoyama, Toshihiko, 2014. "The cyclicality of job-to-job transitions and its implications for aggregate productivity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 1-17.
    2. Jan Eeckhout & Ilse Lindenlaub, 2015. "Unemployment cycles," IFS Working Papers W15/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2016. "The Rise of Part-time Employment," Sciences Po publications 2016-04, Sciences Po.
    4. Tomaz Cajner & Isabel Cairo, 2013. "The Fading Dynamism of the US Labor Market: The Role of Demographics," 2013 Meeting Papers 1208, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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