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Labor in the New Economy

Editor

Listed:
  • Abraham, Katharine G.
  • Spletzer, James R.
  • Harper, Michael

Abstract

As the structure of the economy has changed over the past few decades, researchers and policy makers have been increasingly concerned with how these changes affect workers. In this book, leading economists examine a variety of important trends in the new economy, including inequality of earnings and other forms of compensation, job security, employer reliance on temporary and contract workers, hours of work, and workplace safety and health. In order to better understand these vital issues, scholars must be able to accurately measure labor market activity. Thus, Labor in the New Economy also addresses a host of measurement issues: from the treatment of outliers, imputation methods, and weighting in the context of specific surveys to evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of data from different sources. At a time when employment is a central concern for individuals, businesses, and the government, this volume provides important insight into the recent past and will be a useful tool for researchers in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Abraham, Katharine G. & Spletzer, James R. & Harper, Michael (ed.), 2010. "Labor in the New Economy," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226001432.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bknber:9780226001432
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    Cited by:

    1. Mateusz Pipien & Sylwia Roszkowska, 2015. "Returns to skills in Europe – same or different? The empirical importance of the systems of regressions approach," NBP Working Papers 226, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    2. Maury Gittleman & Brooks Pierce, 2012. "Inter-Industry Compensation Differentials," Working Papers 453, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    3. Harley Frazis & Mark A. Loewenstein, 2013. "How Responsive are Quits to Benefits?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 969-997.

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