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Seda Erdem

Personal Details

First Name:Seda
Middle Name:
Last Name:Erdem
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:per120
http://sedaerdem.com

Affiliation

Economics Division
Stirling Management School
University of Stirling

Stirling, United Kingdom
http://www.stir.ac.uk/management/about/economics/

: +44 (0)1786 467470
+44 1786 46 7469
Stirling FK9 4LA
RePEc:edi:destiuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Erdem, Seda & McCarthy, Tony, 2016. "The effect of front-of-pack nutrition labelling formats on consumers’ food choices and decision-making: merging discrete choice experiment with an eye tracking experiment," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235864, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  2. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Addressing elimination and selection by aspects decision rules in discrete choice experiments: does it matter?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169839, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  3. Campbell, Danny & Erdem, Seda, 2014. "Position bias in best-worst scaling surveys: a case study on trust in institutions," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 177167, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan, 2011. "Using a Discrete Choice Experiment to Elicit Consumers’ WTP for Health Risk Reductions Achieved By Nanotechnology in the UK," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108950, Agricultural Economics Society.
  5. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan, 2011. "Using Best Worst Scaling To Investigate Perceptions Of Control & Concern Over Food And Non-Food Risks," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108790, Agricultural Economics Society.
  6. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan, 2010. "Using Best Worst Scaling To Investigate Perceptions Of Control And Concern Over Food And Non-Food Risks," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61518, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  7. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan & Wossink, Ada, 2010. "Who Is Most Responsible For Ensuring The Meat We Eat Is Safe?," 84th Annual Conference, March 29-31, 2010, Edinburgh, Scotland 91813, Agricultural Economics Society.

Articles

  1. Seda Erdem & Danny Campbell, 2017. "Preferences for public involvement in health service decisions: a comparison between best-worst scaling and trio-wise stated preference elicitation techniques," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(9), pages 1107-1123, December.
  2. Seda Erdem & Danny Campbell & Arne Risa Hole, 2015. "Accounting for Attribute‐Level Non‐Attendance in a Health Choice Experiment: Does it Matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 773-789, July.
  3. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
  4. Seda Erdem, 2015. "Consumers' Preferences for Nanotechnology in Food Packaging: A Discrete Choice Experiment," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 259-279, June.
  5. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 10-22.
  6. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan & Wossink, Ada, 2012. "Using best–worst scaling to explore perceptions of relative responsibility for ensuring food safety," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 661-670.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Campbell, Danny & Erdem, Seda, 2014. "Position bias in best-worst scaling surveys: a case study on trust in institutions," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 177167, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthews, Yvonne & Scarpa, Riccardo & Marsh, Dan, 2017. "Using virtual environments to improve the realism of choice experiments: A case study about coastal erosion management," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 193-208.
    2. Alberto Longo & Danny Campbell, 2017. "The Determinants of Brownfields Redevelopment in England," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(2), pages 261-283, June.
    3. Phillips, Yvonne & Marsh, Dan, 2015. "Virtual Reality and Scope Sensitivity in a Choice Experiment About Coastal Erosion," 2015 Conference (59th), February 10-13, 2015, Rotorua, New Zealand 202571, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    4. Soto, José R. & Adams, Damian C. & Escobedo, Francisco J., 2016. "Landowner attitudes and willingness to accept compensation from forest carbon offsets: Application of best–worst choice modeling in Florida USA," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 35-42.
    5. Seda Erdem & Danny Campbell, 2017. "Preferences for public involvement in health service decisions: a comparison between best-worst scaling and trio-wise stated preference elicitation techniques," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 18(9), pages 1107-1123, December.
    6. Matthews, Yvonne & Scarpa, Riccardo & Marsh, Dan, 2017. "Stability of Willingness-to-Pay for Coastal Management: A Choice Experiment Across Three Time Periods," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 64-73.
    7. Erdem, Seda & McCarthy, Tony, 2016. "The effect of front-of-pack nutrition labelling formats on consumers’ food choices and decision-making: merging discrete choice experiment with an eye tracking experiment," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235864, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Lusk, Jayson L. & Crespi, John M. & McFadden, Brandon R. & Cherry, J. Bradley C. & Martin, Laura & Bruce, Amanda, 2016. "Neural antecedents of a random utility model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 93-103.
    9. Campbell, Danny & Boeri, Marco & Doherty, Edel & George Hutchinson, W., 2015. "Learning, fatigue and preference formation in discrete choice experiments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 345-363.

Articles

  1. Seda Erdem & Danny Campbell & Arne Risa Hole, 2015. "Accounting for Attribute‐Level Non‐Attendance in a Health Choice Experiment: Does it Matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 773-789, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Sandorf, Erlend Dancke & Campbell, Danny & Hanley, Nick, 2017. "Disentangling the influence of knowledge on attribute non-attendance," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 36-50.
    2. Caputo, Vincenzina & Nayga, M. Rodolfo Jr. & Sacchi, Giovanna & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2016. "Attribute non-attendance or attribute-level non-attendance? A choice experiment application on extra virgin olive oil," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236035, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
    4. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Addressing elimination and selection by aspects decision rules in discrete choice experiments: does it matter?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169839, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Kemper, Nathan & Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr. & Popp, Jennie & Bazzani, Claudia, 2016. "The Effects of Honesty Oath and Consequentiality in Choice Experiments," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235381, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Campbell, Danny & Boeri, Marco & Doherty, Edel & George Hutchinson, W., 2015. "Learning, fatigue and preference formation in discrete choice experiments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 345-363.

  2. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Seda Erdem, 2015. "Consumers' Preferences for Nanotechnology in Food Packaging: A Discrete Choice Experiment," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 259-279, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Jianhua Wang & Jiaye Ge & Yuting Ma, 2018. "Urban Chinese Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Pork with Certified Labels: A Discrete Choice Experiment," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-14, February.

  4. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 10-22.

    Cited by:

    1. Sandorf, Erlend Dancke & Campbell, Danny, 2016. "Accommodating satisficing behavior in stated choice experiments," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235905, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
    3. Enni Roukamo & Mikolaj Czajkowski & Nick Hanley & A. Juutinen & R. Svento, 2016. "Linking perceived choice complexity with scale heterogeneity in discrete choice experiments: home heating in Finland," Discussion Papers in Environment and Development Economics 2016-16, University of St. Andrews, School of Geography and Sustainable Development.
    4. Campbell, Danny & Boeri, Marco & Doherty, Edel & George Hutchinson, W., 2015. "Learning, fatigue and preference formation in discrete choice experiments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 345-363.

  5. Erdem, Seda & Rigby, Dan & Wossink, Ada, 2012. "Using best–worst scaling to explore perceptions of relative responsibility for ensuring food safety," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 661-670.

    Cited by:

    1. Glenk, Klaus & Eory, Vera & Colombo, Sergio & Barnes, Andrew, 2014. "Adoption of greenhouse gas mitigation in agriculture: An analysis of dairy farmers' perceptions and adoption behaviour," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 49-58.
    2. Glenka, Klaus & Eorya, Vera & Colombo, Sergio & Barnes, Andrew Peter, 2014. "Adoption of greenhouse gas mitigation in agriculture: an analysis of dairy farmers’ preferences and adoption behaviour," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 170358, Agricultural Economics Society.
    3. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
    4. Katrina J Davis & Marit E Kragt & Stefan Gelcich & Michael Burton & Steven Schilizzi & David J Pannell, 2017. "Why are Fishers not Enforcing Their Marine User Rights?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 67(4), pages 661-681, August.
    5. Morgan, Carissa J. & Dominick, S.R. & Widmar, Nicole J. Olynk & Yeager, Elizabeth A. & Croney, Candace C., 2016. "Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility of Prominent Fast Food Establishments by University Students," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(3), November.
    6. Holland, Jacqueline K. & Olynk Widmar, Nicole J. & Widmar, David A. & Ortega, David L. & Gunderson, Michael A., 2014. "Understanding Producer Strategies: Identifying Key Success Factors of Commercial Farms in 2013," 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas 162422, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (4) 2011-08-15 2014-12-13 2014-12-13 2016-06-09. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (3) 2010-07-17 2011-08-15 2016-06-09. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (2) 2011-08-15 2016-06-09. Author is listed
  4. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2014-12-13
  5. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2010-07-17
  6. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2014-12-13

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