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Accounting for Attribute‐Level Non‐Attendance in a Health Choice Experiment: Does it Matter?

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  • Seda Erdem
  • Danny Campbell
  • Arne Risa Hole

Abstract

An extensive literature has established that it is common for respondents to ignore attributes of the alternatives within choice experiments. In most of the studies on attribute non‐attendance, it is assumed that respondents consciously (or unconsciously) ignore one or more attributes of the alternatives, regardless of their levels. In this paper, we present a new line of enquiry and approach for modelling non‐attendance in the context of investigating preferences for health service innovations. This approach recognises that non‐attendance may not just be associated with attributes but may also apply to the attribute's levels. Our results show that respondents process each level of an attribute differently: while attending to the attribute, they ignore a subset of the attribute's levels. In such cases, the usual approach of assuming that respondents either attend to the attribute or not, irrespective of its levels, is erroneous and could lead to misguided policy recommendations. Our results indicate that allowing for attribute‐level non‐attendance leads to substantial improvements in the model fit and has an impact on estimated marginal willingness to pay and choice predictions.Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Seda Erdem & Danny Campbell & Arne Risa Hole, 2015. "Accounting for Attribute‐Level Non‐Attendance in a Health Choice Experiment: Does it Matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 773-789, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:24:y:2015:i:7:p:773-789
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.3059
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    1. Sandorf, Erlend Dancke & Campbell, Danny & Hanley, Nick, 2017. "Disentangling the influence of knowledge on attribute non-attendance," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 36-50.
    2. Caputo, Vincenzina & Nayga, M. Rodolfo Jr. & Sacchi, Giovanna & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2016. "Attribute non-attendance or attribute-level non-attendance? A choice experiment application on extra virgin olive oil," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 236035, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Arne Risa Hole & Richard Norman & Rosalie Viney, 2016. "Response Patterns in Health State Valuation Using Endogenous Attribute Attendance and Latent Class Analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(2), pages 212-224, February.
    4. Kim Pauwels & Isabelle Huys & Minne Casteels & Yvonne Denier & Martina Vandebroek & Steven Simoens, 2019. "What Does Society Value About Cancer Medicines? A Discrete Choice Experiment in the Belgian Population," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 17(6), pages 895-902, December.
    5. Sandorf, Erlend Dancke & Crastes dit Sourd, Romain & Mahieu, Pierre-Alexandre, 2018. "The effect of attribute-alternative matrix displays on preferences and processing strategies," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 113-132.
    6. Danny Campbell & Seda Erdem, 2015. "Position Bias in Best-worst Scaling Surveys: A Case Study on Trust in Institutions," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(2), pages 526-545.
    7. Kaiying Wang & Chris Barr & Richard Norman & Stacey George & Craig Whitehead & Julie Ratcliffe, 0. "Using Eye-Tracking Technology with Older People in Memory Clinics to Investigate the Impact of Mild Cognitive Impairment on Choices for EQ-5D-5L Health States Preferences," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-11.
    8. Richard Norman & Benjamin M. Craig & Paul Hansen & Marcel F. Jonker & John Rose & Deborah J. Street & Brendan Mulhern, 2019. "Issues in the Design of Discrete Choice Experiments," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;International Academy of Health Preference Research, vol. 12(3), pages 281-285, June.
    9. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 10-22.
    10. Daniel, Aemiro Melkamu, 2020. "Towards Sustainable Energy Consumption Electricity Demand Flexibility and Household Fuel Choice," Umeå Economic Studies 971, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    11. Fabio Boncinelli & Andrea Dominici & Francesca Gerini & Enrico Marone, 2021. "Insights into organic wine consumption: behaviour, segmentation and attribute non-attendance," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 9(1), pages 1-16, December.
    12. Erdem, Seda & Campbell, Danny & Thompson, Carl, 2014. "Addressing elimination and selection by aspects decision rules in discrete choice experiments: does it matter?," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 169839, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Kemper, Nathan & Nayga, Rodolfo M. Jr. & Popp, Jennie & Bazzani, Claudia, 2016. "The Effects of Honesty Oath and Consequentiality in Choice Experiments," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235381, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Campbell, Danny & Boeri, Marco & Doherty, Edel & George Hutchinson, W., 2015. "Learning, fatigue and preference formation in discrete choice experiments," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 345-363.
    15. Kaiying Wang & Chris Barr & Richard Norman & Stacey George & Craig Whitehead & Julie Ratcliffe, 2021. "Using Eye-Tracking Technology with Older People in Memory Clinics to Investigate the Impact of Mild Cognitive Impairment on Choices for EQ-5D-5L Health States Preferences," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 111-121, January.

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