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Investigating Attribute Non‐Attendance And Its Consequences In Choice Experiments With Latent Class Models

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  • Mylene Lagarde

Abstract

A growing literature, mainly from transport and environment economics, has started to explore whether respondents violate some of the axioms about individuals' preferences in Discrete Choice Experiments (DCEs) and use simple strategies to make their choices. One of these strategies, termed attribute non‐attendance (ANA), consists in ignoring one or more attributes. Using data from a DCE administered to healthcare providers in Ghana to evaluate their potential resistance to changes in clinical guidelines, this study illustrates how latent class models can be used in a step‐wise approach to account for all possible ANA strategies used by respondents and explore the consequences of such behaviours. Results show that less than 3% of respondents considered all attributes when choosing between the two hypothetical scenarios proposed, with a majority looking at only one or two attributes. Accounting for ANA strategies improved the goodness‐of‐fit of the model and affected the magnitude of some of the coefficient and willingness‐to‐pay estimates. However, there was no difference in the predicted probabilities of the model taking into account ANA and the standard approach. Although the latter result is reassuring about the ability of DCEs to produce unbiased policy guidance, it should be confirmed by other studies. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Mylene Lagarde, 2013. "Investigating Attribute Non‐Attendance And Its Consequences In Choice Experiments With Latent Class Models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(5), pages 554-567, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:22:y:2013:i:5:p:554-567
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.2824
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.2824
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Method of the month: Eye-tracking
      by carolinemvass in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2018-04-25 06:00:25

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    Cited by:

    1. Yoo, Hong Il & Doiron, Denise, 2013. "The use of alternative preference elicitation methods in complex discrete choice experiments," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1166-1179.
    2. Mehmet Kutluay & Roy Brouwer & Haripriya Gundimeda & Nitin Lokhande & Richard S. J. Tol, 2017. "Public preferences and valuation of new malaria risk," Working Paper Series 1917, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    3. Gelaw, Fekadu & Speelman, Stijn & Van Huylenbroeck, Guido, 2016. "Farmers’ marketing preferences in local coffee markets: Evidence from a choice experiment in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 92-102.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0537 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. J. M. Gibson & D. Rigby & D. A. Polya & N. Russell, 2016. "Discrete Choice Experiments in Developing Countries: Willingness to Pay Versus Willingness to Work," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 65(4), pages 697-721, December.
    6. Melvin Obadha & Edwine Barasa & Jacob Kazungu & Gilbert Abotisem Abiiro & Jane Chuma, 2019. "Attribute development and level selection for a discrete choice experiment to elicit the preferences of health care providers for capitation payment mechanism in Kenya," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, December.
    7. Tienhaara, Annika & Ahtiainen, Heini & Pouta, Eija, 2017. "Operationalization of ecosystem services for choice experiments: the effect of relevance in the valuation of agrienvironmental policies," 2017 International Congress, August 28-September 1, 2017, Parma, Italy 261433, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Owusu, V., 2018. "Credit-Constraints and Preferences for Crop Insurance in Ghana: Implications of Attribute Non-Attendance in Discrete Choice Experiments," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 276967, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Fanus Asefaw Aregay & Liuyang Yao & Minjuan Zhao, 2016. "Spatial Preference Heterogeneity for Integrated River Basin Management: The Case of the Shiyang River Basin, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-17, September.
    10. Sara Kaffashi & Mad Nasir Shamsudin & Shaufique Fahmi Sidique & Abdullatif Bazrbachi & Alias Radam & Khalid Abdul Rahim & Shehu Usman Adam, 2016. "Choice Experiment Attributes Selection: Problems and Approaches in a Modal Shift Study in Klang Valley, Malaysia," Asian Social Science, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 12(1), pages 75-83, January.
    11. Chen, Xuqi & Shen, Meng & Gao, Zhifeng, 2017. "Impact of Intra-respondent Variations in Attribute Attendance on Consumer Preference in Food Choice," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258509, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Weller, Priska & Oehlmann, Malte & Mariel, Petr & Meyerhoff, Jürgen, 2014. "Stated and inferred attribute non-attendance in a design of designs approach," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 11(C), pages 43-56.
    13. Kairies-Schwarz, Nadja & Kokot, Johanna & Vomhof, Markus & Wessling, Jens, 2014. "How Do Consumers Choose Health Insurance? – An Experiment on Heterogeneity in Attribute Tastes and Risk Preferences," Ruhr Economic Papers 537, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    14. Emily Lancsar & Peter Burge, 2014. "Choice modelling research in health economics," Chapters, in: Stephane Hess & Andrew Daly (ed.), Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 28, pages 675-687, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Nadja Kairies-Schwarz & Johanna Kokot & Markus Vomhof & Jens Wessling, 2014. "How Do Consumers Choose Health Insurance? – An Experiment on Heterogeneity in Attribute Tastes and Risk Preferences," Ruhr Economic Papers 0537, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

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