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Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations

Listed author(s):
  • Erdem, Seda
  • Campbell, Danny
  • Thompson, Carl

Priorities for public health innovations are typically not considered equally by all members of the public. When faced with a choice between various innovation options, it is, therefore, possible that some respondents eliminate and/or select innovations based on certain characteristics. This paper proposes a flexible method for exploring and accommodating situations where respondents exhibit such behaviours, whilst addressing preference heterogeneity. We present an empirical case study on the public's preferences for health service innovations. We show that allowing for elimination-by-aspects and/or selection-by-aspects behavioural rules leads to substantial improvements in model fit and, importantly, has implications for willingness to pay estimates and scenario analysis.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629614000927
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 10-22

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:38:y:2014:i:c:p:10-22
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2014.06.012
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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  19. O'Shea, Eamon & Gannon, Brenda & Kennelly, Brendan, 2008. "Eliciting preferences for resource allocation in mental health care in Ireland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(2-3), pages 359-370, December.
  20. Campbell, Danny & Hensher, David A. & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2012. "Cost thresholds, cut-offs and sensitivities in stated choice analysis: Identification and implications," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 396-411.
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