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Seasonal Poverty in Madagascar: Magnitude and Solutions

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Seasonal reductions in food consumption pull about one million Malagasy below the poverty line during the lean season. There they join the nine million more who remain chronically undernourished throughout the year. Because the seasonality of food shortages coincides with the increased prevalence of diarrhea and other diseases during the rainy season, the resulting lean season exacts a heavy toll in the form of increased rates of malnutrition and child mortality. Combining the results of recent field studies with a seasonal multi-market model, this paper measures the probable impacts of three common interventions aimed at combatting seasonal food insecurity. We find the most promising interventions to be those that increase agricultural productivity of the secondary food crops such as cassava, other roots and tubers, and maize.

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  • Benoit Dostie & Steven Haggblade & Josée Randriamamonjy, 2002. "Seasonal Poverty in Madagascar: Magnitude and Solutions," Cahiers de recherche 02-09, HEC Montréal, Institut d'économie appliquée.
  • Handle: RePEc:iea:carech:0209
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    Cited by:

    1. Kehar Singh & Madan M. Dey & Prasanna Surathkal, 2014. "Seasonal and Spatial Variations in Demand for and Elasticities of Fish Products in the United States: An Analysis Based on Market-Level Scanner Data," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 62(3), pages 343-363, September.
    2. Gharad Bryan & Shyamal Chowdhury & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2011. "Seasonal Migration and Risk Aversion," Working Papers id:4650, eSocialSciences.
    3. Gharad Bryan & Shyamal Chowdhury & Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak, 2014. "Underinvestment in a Profitable Technology: The Case of Seasonal Migration in Bangladesh," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82, pages 1671-1748, September.
    4. Andrieu, Nadine & Descheemaeker, Katrien & Sanou, Thierry & Chia, Eduardo, 2015. "Effects of technical interventions on flexibility of farming systems in Burkina Faso: Lessons for the design of innovations in West Africa," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 125-137.
    5. Ugur Ciplak & Eray M. Yucel, 2004. "Trade Protection Measures, Agricultural and Food Prices," Working Papers 0401, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    6. Khandker, Shahidur R., 2012. "Seasonality of income and poverty in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 244-256.
    7. Hirvonen, Kalle & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Worku, Ibrahim, 2015. "Seasonality and household diets in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 74, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Noromiarilanto, Fanambinantsoa & Brinkmann, Katja & Faramalala, Miadana H. & Buerkert, Andreas, 2016. "Assessment of food self-sufficiency in smallholder farming systems of south-western Madagascar using survey and remote sensing data," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 139-149.
    9. repec:eee:agisys:v:154:y:2017:i:c:p:13-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Gilbert, Christopher L. & Christiaensen, Luc & Kaminski, Jonathan, 2017. "Food price seasonality in Africa: Measurement and extent," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 119-132.
    11. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea & Deotti, Laura & Sassi, Maria, 2016. "Sources of food price volatility and child malnutrition in Niger and Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 20-30.
    12. Sandrine Michel & Holimalala Randriamanampisoa, 2017. "The capability approach as a framework for assessing the role of microcredit in resource conversion: the case of rural households in the Madagascar highlands," Post-Print hal-01681797, HAL.
    13. Bosch, Christine & Zeller, Manfred, 0. "The Impacts of Wage Employment on a Jatropha Plantation on Income and Food Security of Rural Households in Madagascar – A Panel Data Analysis," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 52.
    14. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Laura Deotti & Maria Sassi, 2012. "Food Price Volatility over the Last Decade in Niger and Malawi: Extent, Sources and Impact on Child Malnutrition," Working Papers - Economics wp2012_04.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    15. Stifel, David C. & Randrianarisoa, Jean-Claude, 2006. "Agricultural policy in Madagascar: A seasonal multi-market model," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 1023-1027, December.

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    Keywords

    Africa; Madagascar; Price Seasonality; Poverty; Agriculture; Multi-markets Models.;

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