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Politiques publiques et pauvreté : trois études de cas d'évaluation des performances de ciblage et d'analyse d'impact

  • De Vreyer, Philippe
  • Backiny Yetna, Prosper Romuald
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    This work analyses the targeting performance and the impact evaluation of three projects. The first paper is about the water subsidies in the Republic of Congo. The study shows that the self-targeting scheme, using an Inverse Block Tariff structure has poor performance, indeed only those households who are connected can benefit from it, and they are usually non-poor. The self-targeting mechanism used in the Public Work program in Liberia works better since the proportion of poor involved in the program is high. This project has no entry barrier which partly explains the good result. The targeting performance of the Modernization of Agriculture project in the DRC is also poor, most of the beneficiaries being non-poor. The impact in terms of poverty reduction is important in both projects involved in this type of analysis (Modernization of Agriculture in the DRC and Public Work in Liberia), at least for the beneficiaries. The case of the DRC project, however, shows that it is important to lift some other constraints like access to credit and infrastructures in order to improve the impact of the program.

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    File URL: http://basepub.dauphine.fr/xmlui/bitstream/123456789/11794/1/2013PA090002.pdf
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    This book is provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/11794 and published in 2013.
    Order: http://basepub.dauphine.fr/xmlui/handle/123456789/11794
    Handle: RePEc:dau:thesis:123456789/11794
    Note: dissertation
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.dauphine.fr/en/welcome.html

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    1. Mincer, Jacob, 1970. "The Distribution of Labor Incomes: A Survey with Special Reference to the Human Capital Approach," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 1-26, March.
    2. Backiny-Yetna, Prospere & Wodon, Quentin & Mungai, Rose & Tsimpo, Clarence, 2012. "Poverty in Liberia: Level,Profile, and Determinants," MPRA Paper 38546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Wodon, Quentin & Tsimpo, Clarence & Backiny-Yetna, Prospere & Joseph, George & Adoho, Franck & Coulombe, Harold, 2008. "Potential impact of higher food prices on poverty : summary estimates for a dozen west and central African countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4745, The World Bank.
    4. Ravallion, Martin, 2008. "Evaluating Anti-Poverty Programs," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Caliendo, Marco & Kopeinig, Sabine, 2005. "Some Practical Guidance for the Implementation of Propensity Score Matching," IZA Discussion Papers 1588, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. M. Adato & L. Haddad, 2002. "Targeting Poverty through Community-Based Public Works Programmes: Experience from South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 1-36.
    8. Margaret Grosh & Carlo del Ninno & Emil Tesliuc & Azedine Ouerghi, 2008. "For Protection and Promotion : The Design and Implementation of Effective Safety Nets," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6582.
    9. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
    10. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
    11. Abdelkrim Araar, 2007. "Poverty, Inequality and Stochastic Dominance, Theory and Practice: The Case of Burkina Faso," Working Papers PMMA 2007-08, PEP-PMMA.
    12. Tsimpo, Clarence & Wodon, Quentin, 2008. "Rice prices and poverty in Liberia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4742, The World Bank.
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