IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/27737.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender Labor Income Shares and Human Capital Investment in the Republic of Congo

Author

Listed:
  • Backiny-Yetna, Prospere
  • Wodon, Quentin

Abstract

This paper uses a recent, nationally representative household survey for the Republic of Congo—the 2005 ECOM (Enquête Congolaise auprès des Ménages) survey—to test the unitary model of household consumption. The study finds that a higher labor income share obtained by women does lead to a higher share of household consumption allocated to investments in human capital (as proxied through spending for food, education, health, and children’s clothing). The impact is not negligible and it is statistically significant, suggesting long-term benefits through children from efforts to increase female labor income.

Suggested Citation

  • Backiny-Yetna, Prospere & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Gender Labor Income Shares and Human Capital Investment in the Republic of Congo," MPRA Paper 27737, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27737
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27737/1/MPRA_paper_27737.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alain Brilleau & François Roubaud & Constance Torelli, 2004. "L’emploi, le chômage et les conditions d’activité dans les principales agglomérations de sept Etats membres de l’UEMOA Principaux résultats de la phase 1 de l’enquête 1-2-3 de 2001-2002," Working Papers DT/2004/06, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    2. Bourguignon, Francois & Chiappori, Pierre-Andre, 1992. "Collective models of household behavior : An introduction," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(2-3), pages 355-364, April.
    3. Martina Zweimüller & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Doris Weichselbaumer, 2008. "Market Orientation and Gender Wage Gaps: an International Study," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(4), pages 615-635, November.
    4. Deaton,Angus & Muellbauer,John, 1980. "Economics and Consumer Behavior," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521296762, April.
    5. Hoddinott, John & Haddad, Lawrence, 1995. "Does Female Income Share Influence Household Expenditures? Evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(1), pages 77-96, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Backiny Yetna, Prosper Romuald, 2013. "Politiques publiques et pauvreté : trois études de cas d'évaluation des performances de ciblage et d'analyse d'impact," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/11794 edited by De Vreyer, Philippe, June.
    2. Klasen, Stephan & Lechtenfeld, Tobias & Povel, Felix, 2010. "What about the Women? Female Headship, Poverty and Vulnerability in Thailand and Vietnam," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 43, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    3. Mathias Kuepié & Christophe J. Nordman, 2016. "Where Does Education Pay Off in Sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from Two Cities of the Republic of Congo," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 1-27, January.
    4. Jorge Saba Arbache & Alexandre Kolev & Ewa Filipiak, 2010. "Gender Disparities in Africa's Labor Market," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2520.
    5. Angel-Urdinola, Diego & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Income Generation and Intra-Household Decision Making: A Gender Analysis for Nigeria," MPRA Paper 27738, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Nopo, Hugo R. & Daza, Nancy & Ramos, Johanna, 2011. "Gender Earnings Gaps in the World," IZA Discussion Papers 5736, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Labor Income; Consumption Patterns; Republic of Congo;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27737. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.