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Gender, Time Use, and Labor Income in Guinea: Micro and Macro Analyses

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  • Parra Osorio, Juan Carlos
  • Wodon, Quentin

Abstract

Higher incomes for women can have significant beneficial impacts for poverty reduction both in the short run by providing more resources to households and in the long run by increasing investments in the human capital of children. Substantial research has been done using microeconomic household survey data on gender disparities in labor incomes in developing countries in recent years. The first contribution of this paper is to summarize some of that research as applied to Guinea. However, microeconomic studies may not necessarily provide insights on how broad structural shifts in an economy could affect differently opportunities for work and income generation for men and women. In the second part of the paper, we use a recent Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) for Guinea to assess how growth in various sectors of the economy could affect the incomes of women and men both directly and indirectly through multiplier effects. We find that an expansion of sectors oriented primarily towards domestic consumption could have a larger positive impact on the labor income share of women than an expansion of export-oriented sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Parra Osorio, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Gender, Time Use, and Labor Income in Guinea: Micro and Macro Analyses," MPRA Paper 28465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28465
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/28465/3/MPRA_paper_28465.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Hoddinott & Lawrence Haddad, 1994. "Does female income share influence household expenditures? Evidence from the Côte d'Ivoire," CSAE Working Paper Series 1994-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
    3. Parikh, Alka & Thorbecke, Erik, 1996. "Impact of Rural Industrialization on Village Life and Economy: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 351-377, January.
    4. Fofana, Ismael & Parra, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2009. "Exports and labor income by gender: a social accounting matrix analysis for Senegal," MPRA Paper 28473, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Karingi, Stephen N. & Siriwardana, Mahinda., 2003. "A CGE model analysis of effects of adjustment to terms of trade shocks on agriculture and income distribution in Kenya," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 37(1), pages 87-108, September.
    6. Dale W. Jorgenson, 1998. "Growth, Volume 2: Energy, the Environment, and Economic Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 2, number 0262100746, January.
    7. Semboja, Haji Hatibu Haji, 1994. "The effects of energy taxes on the Kenyan economy : A CGE analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 205-215, July.
    8. Defourny, Jacques & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "Structural Path Analysis and Multiplier Decomposition within a Social Accounting Matrix Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(373), pages 111-136, March.
    9. Bardasi, Elena & Wodon, Quentin, 2006. "Poverty Reduction from Full Employment: A Time Use Approach," MPRA Paper 11084, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Appleton, Simon & Hoddinott, John & Krishnan, Pramila, 1999. "The Gender Wage Gap in Three African Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(2), pages 289-312, January.
    11. Quentin Wodon & Elena Bardasi, 2006. "Measuring Time Poverty and Analyzing its Determinants: Concepts and Application to Guinea," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(12), pages 1-7.
    12. Martina Zweimüller & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Doris Weichselbaumer, 2008. "Market Orientation and Gender Wage Gaps: an International Study," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(4), pages 615-635, November.
    13. Arndt, Channing & Jensen, Henning Tarp & Tarp, Finn, 2000. "Structural Characteristics of the Economy of Mozambique: A SAM-Based Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 292-306, October.
    14. Elena Bardasi & Quentin Wodon, 2010. "Working Long Hours and Having No Choice: Time Poverty in Guinea," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 45-78.
    15. Blackden, Mark & Wodon, Quentin, 2006. "Gender, Time Use, and Poverty: Introduction," MPRA Paper 11080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Nganou, Jean-Pascal & Parra, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2009. "Oil price shocks, poverty, and gender: a social accouting matrix analysis for Kenya," MPRA Paper 28471, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Dick, Hermann & Gupta, Sanjeev & Vincent, David & Voigt, Herbert, 1984. "The effect of oil price increases on four oil-poor developing countries : A comparative analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 59-70, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Parra, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "How Does Growth Affect Labor Income by Gender? A Structural Path Analysis for Tanzania," MPRA Paper 27735, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Labor income; Social Accounting Matrix; Guinea;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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