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Oil price shocks, poverty, and gender: a social accouting matrix analysis for Kenya

  • Nganou, Jean-Pascal
  • Parra, Juan Carlos
  • Wodon, Quentin

In a similar way to Input-Output (IO) tables, Social Accounting Matrices (SAMs) have been used in the literature mostly to assess the distributional impact of changes in production structure on household income. Yet they can also be used to assess the impact on price shocks on the cost of goods consumed by households. The key advantage of SAMs over IO tables is that the data from household surveys on the incomes and consumption patterns of various categories of households can be directly integrated into the modeling exercise in order to conduct the distributional analysis. This is illustrated with a discussion of the impact of oil price shocks in Kenya on different types of households defined according to the gender of the household head as well as poverty status. We find that due to some differences in consumption patterns, poorer households are likely to be affected more by oil price hikes than the non-poor, and that household with female heads could also be more affected than households with male heads.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 28471.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28471
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  1. Dale W. Jorgenson, 1998. "Growth, Volume 2: Energy, the Environment, and Economic Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 2, number 0262100746, June.
  2. Pyatt, F Graham & Round, Jeffery I, 1979. "Accounting and Fixed Price Multipliers in a Social Accounting Matrix Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 89(356), pages 850-73, December.
  3. Roland-Holst, David W & Sancho, Ferran, 1995. "Modeling Prices in a SAM Structure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 361-71, May.
  4. Semboja, Haji Hatibu Haji, 1994. "The effects of energy taxes on the Kenyan economy : A CGE analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 205-215, July.
  5. Parikh, Alka & Thorbecke, Erik, 1996. "Impact of Rural Industrialization on Village Life and Economy: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 351-77, January.
  6. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
  7. Arndt, Channing & Jensen, Henning Tarp & Tarp, Finn, 2000. "Structural Characteristics of the Economy of Mozambique: A SAM-Based Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 292-306, October.
  8. Dick, Hermann & Gupta, Sanjeev & Vincent, David & Voigt, Herbert, 1984. "The effect of oil price increases on four oil-poor developing countries : A comparative analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 59-70, January.
  9. Karingi, Stephen N. & Siriwardana, Mahinda., 2003. "A CGE model analysis of effects of adjustment to terms of trade shocks on agriculture and income distribution in Kenya," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 37(1), pages 87-108, September.
  10. Round, Jeffrey I, 1985. "Decomposing Multipliers for Economic Systems Involving Regional and World Trade," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 95(378), pages 383-99, June.
  11. Thorbecke, Erik & Jung, Hong-Sang, 1996. "A multiplier decomposition method to analyze poverty alleviation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 279-300, March.
  12. Defourny, Jacques & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "Structural Path Analysis and Multiplier Decomposition within a Social Accounting Matrix Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(373), pages 111-36, March.
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