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Seasonality and household diets in Ethiopia:


  • Hirvonen, Kalle
  • Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum
  • Worku, Ibrahim


The paper revisits seasonality by assessing how the quantity and quality of diets vary across agricultural seasons in rural and urban Ethiopia. Using unique nationally representative household level data for each month over one calendar year, we document seasonal fluctuations in household diets in terms of both the quantity of calories consumed and the number of different food groups consumed. Households in both rural and urban areas consume less calories in the lean season, but interestingly, due to changes in the composition of diets, the diet diversity score increases towards the end of the lean season.

Suggested Citation

  • Hirvonen, Kalle & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Worku, Ibrahim, 2015. "Seasonality and household diets in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 74, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:esspwp:74

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dostie, B. & Haggblade, S. & Randriamamonjy, J., 2002. "Seasonal poverty in Madagascar: magnitude and solutions," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 493-518.
    2. Popkin, Barry M., 1999. "Urbanization, Lifestyle Changes and the Nutrition Transition," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1905-1916, November.
    3. Berhane, Guush & Mcbride, Linden & Hirfrfot, Kibrom Tafere & Tamru, Seneshaw, 2012. "Patterns in foodgrain consumption and calorie intake," IFPRI book chapters,in: Food and agriculture in Ethiopia: Progress and policy challenges, chapter 7 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Leonard, William R., 1991. "Household-level strategies for protecting children from seasonal food scarcity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1127-1133, January.
    5. Hoddinott, John & Yohannes, Yisehac, 2002. "Dietary diversity as a food security indicator," FCND discussion papers 136, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Kaminski, Jonathan & Christiaensen, Luc & Gilbert, Christopher L., 2014. "The end of seasonality ? new insights from Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6907, The World Bank.
    7. Stefan Dercon & Pramila Krishnan, 2000. "Vulnerability, seasonality and poverty in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 25-53.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Paul & Dillon Brian, 2016. "Working Paper 241 - Long term consequences of consumption seasonality," Working Paper Series 2349, African Development Bank.
    2. Kuma, Tadesse & Dereje, Mekdim & Hirvonen, Kalle & Minten, Bart, 2016. "Cash crops and food security: Evidence from Ethiopian smallholder coffee producers," ESSP working papers 95, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Gilbert, Christopher L. & Christiaensen, Luc & Kaminski, Jonathan, 2017. "Food price seasonality in Africa: Measurement and extent," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 119-132.
    4. Kibrewossen Abay & Kalle Hirvonen, 2017. "Does Market Access Mitigate the Impact of Seasonality on Child Growth? Panel Data Evidence from Northern Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(9), pages 1414-1429, September.
    5. Jacopo, Bonan & Stefano, Pareglio & Valentina, Rotondi, 2015. "Extension Services, Production and Welfare: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Ethiopia," Working Papers 312, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 30 Oct 2015.
    6. Jean-Francois Maystadt & Habtamu Beshir, 2016. "In utero seasonal food insecurity and cognitive development: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers 157856919, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    7. Sibhatu, Kibrom T. & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Farm production diversity and dietary quality: Linkages and measurement issues," Discussion Papers 232343, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.

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    nutrition; food consumption; households; seasonality; diet; calorie intake; dietary diversity;

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