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Conditional determinants of FDI in fast emerging economies: an instrumental quantile regression approach

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  • Simplice Asongu

    () (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

  • Oasis Kodila-Tedika

    () (Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

Abstract

This paper examines FDI determinants in the BRICS and MINT throughout the conditional distributions of FDI for the period 2001-2011. An instrumental variable quantile regression estimation strategy is employed based on the intuition that, the determinants are contingent on initial or existing FDI levels. The following are some of the findings established. First, FDI benefits of GDP growth are more apparent in nations with higher initial levels of FDI. Second, real GDP output would more positively influence FDI in countries where initial levels of FDI are higher. Hence, the market-seeking purposes increases FDI with a larger magnitude in Higher FDI countries. Third, the impact of trade openness has a Kuznets shape for Gross FDI and increasing tendency for Net FDI. The impact of political stability is only significant for Gross FDI in increasing order.

Suggested Citation

  • Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2015. "Conditional determinants of FDI in fast emerging economies: an instrumental quantile regression approach," Working Papers 15/003, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:15/003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dorożyński Tomasz & Kuna-Marszałek Anetta, 2016. "Investments Attractiveness. The Case Of The Visegrad Group Countries," Comparative Economic Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 19(1), pages 119-140, March.
    2. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2016. "Determinants of Mobile Phone Penetration: Panel Threshold Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 77308, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:spr:jknowl:v:9:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13132-015-0322-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Simplice A. Asongu, 2018. "Conditional Determinants of Mobile Phones Penetration and Mobile Banking in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(1), pages 81-135, March.
    5. Simplice Asongu & Uchenna EFOBI & Ibukun BEECROFT, 2015. "FDI, Aid, Terrorism: Conditional Threshold Evidence from Developing Countries," Working Papers 15/019, African Governance and Development Institute..
    6. Simplice Asongu, 2015. "Drivers of Growth in Fast Emerging Economies: A Dynamic Instrumental Quantile Approach," Working Papers 15/009, African Governance and Development Institute..
    7. Simplice Asongu, 2015. "Determinants of Growth in Fast Developing Countries: Evidence from Bundling and Unbundling Institutions," Working Papers 15/010, African Governance and Development Institute..
    8. Alina Taran & Marilena Mironiuc & Maria-Carmen Huian, 2016. "Examining The Influence Of Some Macroeconomic Factors On Foreign Direct Investments," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 18, pages 159-182, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; Emerging countries; Quantile regression;

    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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