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Determinants of Growth in Fast Developing Countries: Evidence from Bundling and Unbundling Institutions

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  • Asongu, Simplice

Abstract

Purpose – We assess growth determinants in the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and MINT (Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey) fast-developing nations for the period 2001-2011. Particular emphasis is laid on the bundling and unbundling of ten governance dynamics. Design/methodology/approach- Contemporary and non-contemporary Fixed- and Random-Effects regressions are employed as empirical strategies. GDP growth and real GDP output are used as dependent variables. The governance variables are bundled by means of principal component analysis. Findings- The following are some findings. First, governance is more positively significant in non-contemporary specifications as opposed to contemporary regressions. Second, there is some interesting evidence on the heterogeneity of political governance as a driver. Political governance and its constituents (political stability and voice & accountability) are significantly positive in GDP growth but insignificant in real GDP output regressions. Third, the other governance dynamics are more significant determinants of real GDP output, as opposed to GDP growth. Accordingly, they are insignificant in contemporary regressions and negatively significant in non-contemporary regressions for GDP growth. Fourth, the constituents of economic governance have the highest magnitude in the positive effects of governance dynamics on real GDP output. Practical implications- The following are some practical implications. First, lag determinants are necessary for growth targeting or timing of growth dynamics. Growth drivers for the most part are more significantly determined by past information. Second, political governance is the most important driver of economic growth, with the significance of effects more apparent in non-contemporary regressions. Third, economic governance and institutional governance are more positively predisposed to driving real GDP output than GDP growth. Originality/value- As far as we have reviewed, it is the first study to investigate growth determinants in the BRICS and MINT nations. It has strong implications for other developing countries on the contem

Suggested Citation

  • Asongu, Simplice, 2015. "Determinants of Growth in Fast Developing Countries: Evidence from Bundling and Unbundling Institutions," MPRA Paper 67310, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67310
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2016. "The Mobile Phone in the Diffusion of Knowledge for Institutional Quality in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 133-147.
    2. Simplice Asongu, 2017. "Does Globalization Promote Good Governance in Africa? An Empirical Study Across 51 countries," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 17/026, African Governance and Development Institute..
    3. repec:kap:netnom:v:18:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11066-017-9118-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. ASONGU, Simplice & ODHIAMBO, Nicholas, 2018. "Drivers Of Growth In Fast Emerging Economies: A Dynamic Instrumental Quantile Approach To Real Output And Its Rates Of Growth In Brics And Mint Countries, 2001-2011," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 18(1), pages 5-22.
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas Biekpe, 2017. "Government quality determinants of ICT adoption in sub-Saharan Africa," Netnomics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 107-130, December.
    6. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2016. "The role of governance in mobile phones for inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Technovation, Elsevier, vol. 55, pages 1-13.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Growth; emerging countries; governance;

    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • P37 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Legal

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