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Revolution empirics: predicting the Arab Spring

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  • Simplice Asongu

    () (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

  • Jacinta C. Nwachukwu

    () (Huddersfield, HD1 3DH, UK)

Abstract

The paper examines whether the Arab Spring phenomenon was predictable by complete elimination in the dispersion of core demands for better governance, more jobs and stable consumer prices. A methodological innovation of the Generalized Methods of Moments is employed to assess the feasibility and timing of the revolution. The empirical evidence reveals that from a projection date of 2007, the Arab Spring was foreseeable between 2011 and 2012. The paper contributes at the same time to the empirics of predicting revolutions and the scarce literature on modeling the future of socio-economic events. Caveats and cautions are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2014. "Revolution empirics: predicting the Arab Spring," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 14/032, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:14/032
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Arab Spring; Political Instability; Timing; Economic Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • N17 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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