IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/5430.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The worldwide governance indicators : methodology and analytical issues

Author

Listed:
  • Kaufmann, Daniel
  • Kraay, Aart
  • Mastruzzi, Massimo

Abstract

This paper summarizes the methodology of the Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGI) project, and related analytical issues. The WGI cover over 200 countries and territories, measuring six dimensions of governance starting in 1996: Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence/Terrorism, GovernmentEffectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law, and Control of Corruption. The aggregate indicators are based on several hundred individual underlying variables, taken from a wide variety of existing data sources. The data reflect the views on governance of survey respondents and public, private, and NGO sector experts worldwide. The WGI also explicitly report margins of error accompanying each country estimate. These reflect the inherent difficulties in measuring governance using any kind of data. Even after taking these margins of error into account, the WGI permit meaningful cross-country and over-time comparisons. The aggregate indicators, together with the disaggregated underlying source data, are available at www.govindicators.org.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Mastruzzi, Massimo, 2010. "The worldwide governance indicators : methodology and analytical issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5430, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5430
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2010/09/24/000158349_20100924120727/Rendered/PDF/WPS5430.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mary Hallward-Driemeier & Gita Khun-Jush & Lant Pritchett, 2014. "Deals versus Rules: Policy Implementation Uncertainty and Why Firms Hate It," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume I: Government and Institutions, pages 215-260, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Ishac Diwan & Philip Keefer & Marc Schiffbauer, 2015. "Pyramid Capitalism: Cronyism, Regulation, and Firm Productivity in Egypt," CID Working Papers 291, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Bent E. Sørensen, 2014. "Misallocation, Property Rights, and Access to Finance: Evidence from within and across Africa," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 183-211, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Marc Schiffbauer & Abdoulaye Sy & Sahar Hussain & Hania Sahnoun & Philip Keefer, 2015. "Jobs or Privileges : Unleashing the Employment Potential of the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 20591.
    4. Sequeira, Sandra & Djankov, Simeon, 2014. "Corruption and firm behavior: Evidence from African ports," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 277-294.
    5. Diwan, Ishac & Jamal Ibrahim Haidar, "undated". "Do Political Connections Reduce Job Creation? Evidence from Lebanon," Working Paper 414186, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    6. Nurullah Gur, 2012. "Financial Constraints, Quality of Institutions and Firm Size: What Do Perceptions Tell Us?," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 2(2), pages 17-36, December.
    7. World Bank, 2012. "World Development Report 2013 [Rapport sur le développement dans le monde 2013]," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 11843.
    8. World Bank & International Finance Corporation, 2013. "Doing Business 2014 : Understanding Regulations for Small and Medium-Size Enterprises," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16204.
    9. Raj Nallari & Breda Griffith & Shahid Yusuf, 2012. "Geography of Growth : Spatial Economics and Competitiveness," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6020.
    10. AfDB AfDB, . "Africa Competitiveness Report 2013," Africa Competitiveness Report, African Development Bank, number 456, March.
    11. D'Erasmo, Pablo N. & Moscoso Boedo, Hernan J., 2012. "Financial structure, informality and development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 286-302.
    12. Ishac Diwan & Philip Keefer & Marc Schiffbauer, 2020. "Pyramid capitalism: Cronyism, regulation, and firm productivity in Egypt," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 211-246, January.
    13. Alan Gelb & Christian J. Meyer & Vijaya Ramachandran, 2014. "Development as Diffusion: Manufacturing Productivity and Sub-Saharan Africa's Missing Middle," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-042, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Mary Hallward-Driemeier & Lant Pritchett, 2015. "How Business Is Done in the Developing World: Deals versus Rules," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 121-140, Summer.
    15. Lant Pritchett & Mary Hallward-Driemeier, 2010. "How Business is Done and the 'Doing Business' Indicators: The Investment Climate when Firms have Climate Control," CID Working Papers 211, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    16. Piffaretti, Nadia F., 2010. "From Rent-seeking to Profit-creation: Private Sector Development and Economic Turnaround in Fragile States," MPRA Paper 26558, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Lixin Colin Xu, 2011. "The Effects of Business Environments on Development: Surveying New Firm-level Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 26(2), pages 310-340, August.
    18. Alan Gelb, Christian Meyer, and Vijaya Ramachandran, 2014. "Development as Diffusion: Manufacturing Productivity and Sub-Saharan Africa’s Missing Middle - Working Paper 357," Working Papers 357, Center for Global Development.
    19. Iacovone,Leonardo & Ramachandran,Vijaya & Schmidt,Martin, 2013. "Stunted growth : why don't African firms create more jobs ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6727, The World Bank.
    20. Pratap Bhanu Mehta & Michael Walton, 2014. "Ideas, interests and the politics of development change in India: capitalism, inclusion and the state," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-036-14, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5430. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Roula I. Yazigi (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.