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A brief future of Time in the monopoly of scientific knowledge

  • Asongu Simplice

    ()

    (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

This seminal paper provides global empirical evidence on catch-up processes in scientific and technical publications. Its purpose is to model the future of scientific knowledge monopoly in order to understand whether the impressive growth experienced by latecomers in the industry has been accompanied by a similar catch-up in scientific capabilities and knowledge contribution. The empirical evidence is based on 41 catch-up panels which together consist of 99 countries. The richness of the dataset allows us to disaggregate countries into fundamental characteristics based on income-levels (high-income, lower-middle-income, upper-middle-income and low-income), legal-origins (English common-law, French civil-law, German civil-law and, Scandinavian civil-law) and, regional proximity (South Asia, Europe & Central Asia, East Asia & the Pacific, Middle East & North Africa, Latin America & the Caribbean and, Sub-Saharan Africa). Three main issues are investigated: the presence or not of catch-up processes, the speed of the catch-up processes and, the time needed for full (100%) catch-up. The findings based on absolute and conditional catch-up patterns broadly show that advanced countries will continue to dominate in scientific knowledge contribution. Policy implications are discussed.

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File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/A-brief-future-of-Time-in-the-monopoly-of-scientific-knowledge.pdf
File Function: Revised version, 2013
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Paper provided by African Governance and Development Institute. in its series Working Papers with number 13/001.

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Length: 31
Date of creation: 01 May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:13/001
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  1. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting software piracy in Africa: how do legal origins and IPRs protection channels matter?," Working Papers 12/016, African Governance and Development Institute..
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  13. Giuseppe Bruno & Riccardo De Bonis, 2009. "Do Financial Systems Converge?: New Evidence from Household Financial Assets in Selected OECD Countries," OECD Statistics Working Papers 2009/1, OECD Publishing.
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  18. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Real and monetary policy convergence: EMU crisis to the CFA zone," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 20-38, February.
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