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Catching Up and Academic Institutions: A Comparative Study of Past National Experiences

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  • Roberto Mazzoleni

Abstract

The universities' role in economic development is again today an important focus of debate. While policy in developing countries often aims at reproducing advanced economies' institutions, recent research on national systems of innovation frames the hypothesis that the catching up process is marked by changes in the contribution of academic institutions to the development of firm-level capabilities. This paper argues in favour of this hypothesis. Drawing from the history of successful national catching up processes, it identifies important similarities across countries despite variations in historical context and local conditions. Each country struggled to achieve an effective integration of academic institutions into the industrial development process. This task was particularly difficult when industry needs were poorly articulated or neglected by the evolution of educational curricula.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Mazzoleni, 2008. "Catching Up and Academic Institutions: A Comparative Study of Past National Experiences," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(5), pages 678-700.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:44:y:2008:i:5:p:678-700
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380802009175
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bodas Freitas, Isabel Maria & Marques, Rosane Argou & Silva, Evando Mirra de Paula e, 2013. "University–industry collaboration and innovation in emergent and mature industries in new industrialized countries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 443-453.
    2. Simplice A Asongu, 2013. "On the Obituary of Scientific Knowledge Monopoly," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(4), pages 2718-2731.
    3. Simplice A. Asongu, 2017. "Boosting Scientific Publications in Africa: Which IPRs Protection Channels Matter?," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(1), pages 197-210, March.
    4. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "PhD by Publication as an Argument for Innovation and Technology Transfer: with Emphasis on Africa," Working Papers 16/030, African Governance and Development Institute..
    5. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou & Paul Acha-Anyi, 2017. "Who is Who in Knowledge Economy in Africa?," Working Papers 17/043, African Governance and Development Institute..
    6. Jorge Niosi, 2010. "Building National and Regional Innovation Systems," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14006.
    7. Elisa Giuliani & Andrea Morrison & Roberta Rabellotti, 2011. "Innovation and Technological Catch-up in the Wine Industry: An Introduction," Chapters,in: Innovation and Technological Catch-Up, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "A Brief Future of Time in the Monopoly of Scientific Knowledge," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 58(4), pages 638-671, December.
    9. Glenda Kruss, 2012. "Channels of interaction in health biotechnology networks in South Africa: who benefits and how?," International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(1/2), pages 204-220.
    10. Simplice A. Asongu, 2017. "The Comparative Economics of Knowledge Economy in Africa: Policy Benchmarks, Syndromes, and Implications," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(2), pages 596-637, June.

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