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World Inequality and Globalization

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  • Bob Sutcliffe

Abstract

The article assesses recent attempts to measure the level and changes in world inequality. It compares results based on country averages, population-weighted inter-country Gini coefficients, and combinations of inter-country and intra-country distribution figures. Most measures agree that inequality grew up to 1980; some suggest that it stabilized or declined slightly after that date, but that conclusion is not definitive. The article argues against reliance on single indicators to measure world inequality as opposed to looking at various measures, including inequality between regions and the ratios of incomes of the poor and the rich. According to several of these measures, inequality has continued to grow. The addition of variables other than income (life expectancy and education) appear to reduce inequality, but this is largely an illusion. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bob Sutcliffe, 2004. "World Inequality and Globalization," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 15-37, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:20:y:2004:i:1:p:15-37
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    Cited by:

    1. Ines Lindner & Holger Strulik, 2017. "Innovation and Inequality in a Small World," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-057/II, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Milanovic, Branko, 2007. "Where in the world are you? Assessing the importance of circumstance and effort in a world of different mean country incomes and (almost) no migration," MPRA Paper 3420, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Simplice Asongu & Ivo Leke, 2017. "External Flows and Inclusive Human Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 17/058, African Governance and Development Institute..
    4. Emma Aisbett, 2007. "Why are the Critics So Convinced that Globalization is Bad for the Poor?," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 33-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jonathan Perraton, 2011. "The Scope and Implications of Globalisation," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. repec:liu:liucej:v:13:y:2016:i:2:p:221-246 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Iulia Andreea BUCUR & Oana Ancuta STANGACIU, 2015. "The European Union Convergence In Terms Of Economic And Human Development," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 7(2), pages 256-275, August.
    8. Crow, Ben D, 2006. "Global Statistics," Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, Working Paper Series qt06d5c2h5, Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, UC Santa Cruz.
    9. Benno Torgler & Marco Piatti, 2013. "Extraordinary Wealth, Globalization, And Corruption," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59(2), pages 341-359, June.
    10. Narasimha Rao, 2014. "International and intranational equity in sharing climate change mitigation burdens," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 129-146, May.
    11. Lindner, Ines & Strulik, Holger, 2014. "The great divergence: A network approach," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 193, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    12. Torrisi, Gianpiero & Pike, Andy & Tomaney, John & Tselios, Vassilis, 2011. "(Re-)exploring the link between devolution and regional disparities in Italy," MPRA Paper 32212, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Wagle, Udaya R., 2007. "Are Economic Liberalization and Equality Compatible? Evidence from South Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1836-1857, November.
    14. Simplice Asongu, 2015. "Rational Asymmetric Development, Piketty and the Spirit of Poverty in Africa," Working Papers 15/006, African Governance and Development Institute..
    15. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "African Development: Beyond Income Convergence," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(3), pages 334-353, September.
    16. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Revolution empirics: predicting the Arab Spring," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 439-482, September.
    17. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Rational Asymmetric Development, Piketty and Poverty in Africa," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 13(2), pages 221-246, December.

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