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Human Capital Development, War and Foreign Direct Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Adil Suliman
  • Andre Varella Mollick

Abstract

The authors use a panel data fixed effect model to identify the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) for a large sample of 29 sub-Saharan African countries from 1980 to 2003. They test whether human capital development, defined by either literacy rates or economic freedom, and the incidence of war affect FDI flows to these countries. Combining these explanatory variables to several widely used control variables, it was found that the literacy rate (human capital), freedom (political rights and civil rights) and the incidence of war are important FDI determinants. The results confirm our expected signs: FDI inflows respond positively to the literacy rate and to improvements in political rights and civil liberties; war events, by contrast, exert strong negative effects on FDI. For robustness, the model is estimated for religious groupings of sub-Saharan African countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Adil Suliman & Andre Varella Mollick, 2009. "Human Capital Development, War and Foreign Direct Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 47-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:37:y:2009:i:1:p:47-61
    DOI: 10.1080/13600810802660828
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kafayat Amusa & Nara Monkam & Nicola Viegi, 2016. "Foreign Aid and Foreign Direct Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 201642, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Dalibor Gottwald & Libor Švadlenka & Hana Pavlisová, 2016. "Human Capital and Growth of E-postal Services: A cross-country Analysis in Developing Countries," Post-Print hal-01307145, HAL.
    3. Nikolaos Antonakakis & Gabriele Tondl, 2011. "Do determinants of FDI to developing countries differ among OECD investors? Insights from Bayesian Model Averaging," FIW Working Paper series 076, FIW.
    4. Nandipha Dondashe & Andrew Phiri, 2018. "Determinants of FDI in South Africa: Do macroeconomic variables matter?," Working Papers 1802, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Jan 2018.
    5. Nandipha Dondashe & Andrew Phiri, 2018. "Determinants of FDI in South Africa: Do macroeconomic variables matter?," Working Papers 1802, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Jan 2018.
    6. Asongu, Simplice & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2015. "Conditional determinants of FDI in fast emerging economies: an instrumental quantile regression approach," MPRA Paper 67297, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Röttgers, Dirk & Grote, Ulrike, 2014. "Africa and the Clean Development Mechanism: What Determines Project Investments?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 201-212.
    8. Akpan, Uduak & Isihak, Salisu & Asongu, Simplice, 2014. "Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Fast-Growing Economies: A Study of BRICS and MINT," MPRA Paper 56810, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Metaxas, Theodore & Kechagia, Polyxeni, 2016. "Literature review of 100 empirical studies of Foreign Direct Investment: 1950-2015," MPRA Paper 71414, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Cleeve, Emmanuel A. & Debrah, Yaw & Yiheyis, Zelealem, 2015. "Human Capital and FDI Inflow: An Assessment of the African Case," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 1-14.

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