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Are Foreign Aid and Remittances a Hedge against Food Price Shocks in Developing Countries?


  • Jean-Louis Combes

    (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Christian Hubert Ebeke

    () (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Mireille S. Ntsama Etoundi

    () (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Thierry Yogo

    (Université de Yaoundé II)


This paper measures the effects of food price shocks on both the level of household consumption per capita and the instability of the household consumption per capita growth rate in developing countries. In this vein, the paper explores the role of aid and remittance inflows in the mitigation of the effects of food price shocks in the recipient economies. Using a large sample of developing countries observed over the period 1980-2009 and mobilising dynamic panel data specifications, the econometric results yield three important findings. First, food price shocks significantly affect both the level and the instability of household consumption in highly vulnerable countries. Second, remittance and aid inflows significantly dampen the effect of food price shocks in the most vulnerable countries. Third, a lower remittance-to-GDP ratio is required in order to fully absorb the effects of food price shocks compared to the corresponding aid-to-GDP ratio.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Hubert Ebeke & Mireille S. Ntsama Etoundi & Thierry Yogo, 2012. "Are Foreign Aid and Remittances a Hedge against Food Price Shocks in Developing Countries?," Working Papers halshs-00608128, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00608128
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Combes, Jean-Louis & Ebeke, Christian, 2011. "Remittances and Household Consumption Instability in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1076-1089, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Filippo Presbitero, 2013. "Aid and Vulnerability," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 88, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    2. Mthuli Ncube & Zuzana Brixiova, 2013. "Working Paper 188 - Remittances and their Macroeconomic Impact: Evidence from Africa," Working Paper Series 996, African Development Bank.
    3. Giulia Bettin & Andrea F. Presbitero & Nikola L. Spatafora, 2017. "Remittances and Vulnerability in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 1-23.
    4. Supriyo De & Ergys Islamaj & Ayhan Kose & S. Reza Yousefi, 2016. "Remittances over the Business Cycle: Theory and Evidence," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1601, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    5. Badolo, Felix & Kinda, Somlanare Romuald, 2012. "Climatic shocks and food security in developing countries," MPRA Paper 43006, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    vulnerability; Household consumption; food price shocks; Aid; Remittances;

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