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Rita Ginja

Personal Details

First Name:Rita
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ginja
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgi187
https://sites.google.com/site/rcginja/

Affiliation

(95%) Institutt for Økonomi
Universitetet i Bergen

Bergen, Norway
http://www.uib.no/econ/
RePEc:edi:iouibno (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sarah Cattan & Gabriella Conti & Christine Farquharson & Rita Ginja & Maud Pecher, 2021. "The Health Effects of Universal Early Childhood Interventions: Evidence from Sure Start," Working Papers 2021-051, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  2. Bütikofer, Aline & Ginja, Rita & Landaud, Fanny & Løken, Katrine, 2020. "School Selectivity, Peers, and Mental Health," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 21/2020, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
  3. Ginja, Rita & Karimi, Arizo & Xiao, Pengpeng, 2020. "Employer Responses to Family Leave Programs," Working Papers in Economics 6/20, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  4. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita & Narita, Renata, 2019. "The Value of Free Health Insurance Schemes in Developing Countries," Research Department working papers 1519, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
  5. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2018. "Parental leave benefits, household labor supply, and children's long-run outcomes," IFS Working Papers W18/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita & Narita, Renata, 2018. "The Value of Health Insurance: A Household Job Search Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11706, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  7. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, Renata Narita, 2017. "Non-Contributory Health Insurance and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2017_17, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
  8. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, 2017. "Who benefits from free health insurance: evidence from Mexico," IFS Working Papers W17/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  9. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2017. "Parental Investments in Early Life and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Swedish Parental Leave Rules," Working Papers 2017-085, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  10. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita, 2016. "Health Insurance and Child Health: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 10122, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  11. Bahar Baziki, Selva & Ginja, Rita & Borota Milicevic, Teodora, 2015. "Trade Competition, Technology and Labor Re-allocation," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2016:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  12. Ginja, Rita & Carneiro, Pedro & Galasso, Emanuela, 2014. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Working Paper Series 2014:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  13. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:22, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  14. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2012. "Long term impacts of compensatory preschool on health and behavior: evidence from Head Start," CeMMAP working papers CWP01/12, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  15. Rita Ginja, 2010. "Income Shocks and Investments in Human Capital," 2010 Meeting Papers 1165, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  16. Abrahamsen, Signe A. & Ginja, Rita & Riise, Julie, "undated". "School Health Programs: Education, Health and Welfare Dependency of Young Adults," CINCH Working Paper Series (since 2020) 74644, Duisburg-Essen University Library, DuEPublico.

Articles

  1. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2020. "Parental Leave Benefits, Household Labor Supply, and Children’s Long-Run Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 261-320.
  2. Pedro Carneiro & Emanuela Galasso & Rita Ginja, 2019. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 129(617), pages 172-208.
  3. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2016. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(596), pages 66-95, October.
  4. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Long-Term Impacts of Compensatory Preschool on Health and Behavior: Evidence from Head Start," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 135-173, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2015. "Partial insurance and investments in children," CeMMAP working papers CWP19/15, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Partial insurance and investments in children By: Pedro Carneiro (Institute for Fiscal Studies and cemmap and UCL) ; Rita Ginja (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Uppsala)
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2015-08-17 19:33:01
  2. Pedro Carneiro & Emanuela Galasso & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Tackling social exclusion: evidence from Chile," CeMMAP working papers CWP24/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Tackling social exclusion: evidence from Chile
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-04-07 18:41:47

Working papers

  1. Ginja, Rita & Karimi, Arizo & Xiao, Pengpeng, 2020. "Employer Responses to Family Leave Programs," Working Papers in Economics 6/20, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Schmutte, Ian M. & Skira, Meghan M., 2020. "The Response of Firms to Maternity Leave and Sickness Absence," GLO Discussion Paper Series 691, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Huebener, Mathias & Jessen, Jonas & Kühnle, Daniel & Oberfichtner, Michael, 2021. "A Firm-Side Perspective on Parental Leave," IZA Discussion Papers 14478, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Ann P. Bartel & Maya Rossin-Slater & Christopher J. Ruhm & Meredith Slopen & Jane Waldfogel, 2021. "The Impact of Paid Family Leave on Employers: Evidence from New York," NBER Working Papers 28672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2018. "Parental leave benefits, household labor supply, and children's long-run outcomes," IFS Working Papers W18/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Chuard, Caroline, 2020. "Womb at work: The missing impact of maternal employment on newborn health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    2. Finlay, Jocelyn E., 2021. "Women’s reproductive health and economic activity: A narrative review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 139(C).
    3. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Hassani Nezhad, Lena & Karunanethy, Kalaivani & Lalive, Rafael, 2021. "Mothers at Work: How Mandating Paid Maternity Leave Affects Employment, Earnings and Fertility," IZA Discussion Papers 14605, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Fernando Delbianco & Federico Fioravanti & Fernando Tohm'e, 2020. "The Impact of Birth Order on Behavior in Contact Team Sports: the Evidence of Rugby Teams in Argentina," Papers 2004.09421, arXiv.org.
    5. Fabel, Marc, 2021. "Maternity leave and children's health outcomes in the long-term," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C).
    6. Moberg, Ylva, 2019. "Speedy responses: Effects of higher benefits on take-up and division of parental leave," Working Paper Series 2019:2, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    7. Chu, Yu-Wei Luke & Cuffe, Harold E & Doan, Nguyen, 2021. "Motherhood Employment Penalty and Gender Wage Gap Across Countries: 1990–2010," Working Paper Series 9446, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    8. Joseph Price & Luke P. Rodgers & Jocelyn S. Wikle, 2021. "Dinner timing and human capital investments in children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 1047-1075, December.
    9. Ginja, Rita & Karimi, Arizo & Xiao, Pengpeng, 2020. "Employer Responses to Family Leave Programs," Working Papers in Economics 6/20, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    10. Canaan, Serena, 2019. "Parental Leave, Household Specialization and Children's Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 12420, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Katharina Heisig & Larissa Zierow, 2020. "Elternzeitverlängerung in der DDR: Langfristig höhere Lebenszufriedenheit der Kinder," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 27(02), pages 07-09, April.
    12. Tudor, Simona, 2020. "Financial incentives, fertility and early life child outcomes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    13. Paule-Paludkiewicz, Hannah, 2020. "Does the Right to Work Part-Time Affect Mothers' Labor Market Outcomes?," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224556, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    14. Dong, Xinwei, 2020. "Effect of birth interval on the first child’s nutrition status: Evidence from China," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    15. Moberg, Ylva, 2018. "Speedy Responses: Effects of Higher Benefits on Take-up and Division of Parental Leave," Working Paper Series 2018:14, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

  3. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita & Narita, Renata, 2018. "The Value of Health Insurance: A Household Job Search Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11706, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2019. "Welfare and Redistributive Effects of Social Assistance in the Global South," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 3-22, December.
    2. Hanming Fang & Andrew J. Shephard, 2019. "Household Labor Search, Spousal Insurance, and Health Care Reform," NBER Working Papers 26350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, Renata Narita, 2017. "Non-Contributory Health Insurance and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2017_17, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).

    Cited by:

    1. Bobba, Matteo & Flabbi, Luca & Levy Algazi, Santiago, 2017. "Labor Market Search, Informality and Schooling Investments," IZA Discussion Papers 11170, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, 2017. "Who benefits from free health insurance: evidence from Mexico," IFS Working Papers W17/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

  5. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, 2017. "Who benefits from free health insurance: evidence from Mexico," IFS Working Papers W17/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Schmieder, Julia, 2020. "Fertility as a Driver of Maternal Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 13496, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. del Valle, Alejandro, 2021. "The effects of public health insurance in labor markets with informal jobs: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).

  6. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2017. "Parental Investments in Early Life and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Swedish Parental Leave Rules," Working Papers 2017-085, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Chuard, Caroline, 2020. "Womb at work: The missing impact of maternal employment on newborn health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).

  7. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita, 2016. "Health Insurance and Child Health: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 10122, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, Renata Narita, 2017. "Non-Contributory Health Insurance and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2017_17, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    2. Marcos Diaz, 2020. "Three essays on development economics : public policies and geographical discontinuities," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/6rl0q151go8, Sciences Po.
    3. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja & Renata Narita, 2018. "The value of health insurance: a household job search approach," IFS Working Papers W18/20, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. Sonia Bhalotra & Rudi Rocha & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2019. "Does Universalization of Health Work? Evidence from Health Systems Restructuring and Expansion in Brazil," Documentos de Trabajo LACEA 017122, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA.
    5. Miguel Ángel Carpio & Lucero Gómez & Pablo Lavado, 2021. "Does social health insurance spillover to student performance? Evidence from an RDD in Peru," Working Papers 178, Peruvian Economic Association.
    6. Mahé, Clotilde, 2017. "Does publicly provided health care affect migration? Evidence from Mexico," MERIT Working Papers 2017-049, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

  8. Bahar Baziki, Selva & Ginja, Rita & Borota Milicevic, Teodora, 2015. "Trade Competition, Technology and Labor Re-allocation," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2016:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Spencer Bastani & Tomer Blumkin & Luca Micheletto, 2016. "Anti-discrimination Legislation and the Efficiency-Enhancing Role of Mandatory Parental Leave," CESifo Working Paper Series 5917, CESifo.
    2. Borrs, Linda & Knauth, Florian, 2016. "The impact of trade and technology on wage components," DICE Discussion Papers 241, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    3. Edoardo Di Porto & Henry Ohlsson, 2016. "Avoiding Taxes by Transfers Within the Family," CSEF Working Papers 436, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    4. Kumar, Anil & Liang, Che-Yuan, 2017. "Estimating Taxable Income Responses with Elasticity Heterogeneity," Working Paper Series 2017:5, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gueyon Kim & Dohyeon Lee, 2020. "Offshoring and Segregation by Skill: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 2020-073, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    6. Winkler, Erwin, 2020. "Diverging paths: Labor reallocation, sorting, and wage inequality," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224535, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Laun, Tobias & Wallenius, Johanna, 2017. "Having It All? Employment, Earnings and Children," Working Paper Series 2017:6, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    8. Ando, Michihito & Dahlberg, Matz & Engström, Gustav, 2017. "The risks of nuclear disaster and its impact on housing prices," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 13-16.
    9. Borrs, Linda & Knauth, Florian, 2021. "Trade, technology, and the channels of wage inequality," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 131(C).
    10. Graetz, Georg, 2020. "Technological change and the Swedish labor market," Working Paper Series 2020:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

  9. Ginja, Rita & Carneiro, Pedro & Galasso, Emanuela, 2014. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Working Paper Series 2014:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Paula Carrasco & Rodrigo Ceni & Ivone Perazzo & Gonzalo Salas, 2021. "Are Not Any Silver Linings in the Cloud? Subjective Well-being Among Deprived Young People," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 491-516, February.
    2. Aline Bütikofer & Rita Ginja & Fanny Landaud & Katrine Løken, 2020. "School Selectivity, Peers, and Mental Health," Working Papers 2020-074, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Clarke, Damian & Cortés, Gustavo & Vergara, Diego, 2017. "Growing Together: Assessing Equity and Effciency in an Early-Life Health Program in Chile," Research Department working papers 1139, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
    4. Damian Clarke & Gustavo Cortés Méndez & Diego Vergara Sepúlveda, 2020. "Growing together: assessing equity and efficiency in a prenatal health program," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 883-956, July.
    5. Guido Neidhöfer & Miguel Niño‐Zarazúa, 2019. "The Long(er)‐Term Impacts of Chile Solidario on Human Capital and Labor Income," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 45(S1), pages 209-244, December.
    6. Laura Abramovsky & Orazio Attanasio & Kai Barron & Pedro Carneiro & George Stoye, 2016. "Challenges to Promoting Social Inclusion of the Extreme Poor: Evidence from a Large-Scale Experiment in Colombia," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 89-141, April.
    7. Camacho, Adriana & Cunningham, Wendy & Rigolini, Jamele & Silva, Veronica, 2014. "Addressing access and behavioral constraints through social intermediation services : a review of Chile Solidario and Red Unidos," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7136, The World Bank.
    8. Cazzuffi, Chiara & Díaz, Vivián & Fernández, Juan & Leyton, Cristian, 2020. "Spatial inequality and aspirations for economic inclusion among Latin American youth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 118(C).
    9. Margherita Scarlato & Giorgio d'Agostino & Francesca Capparucci, 2016. "Evaluating CCTs from a Gender Perspective: The Impact of Chile Solidario on Women's Employment Prospect," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 177-197, March.
    10. Pedro Lara de Arruda & Luísa A. Nazareno & Manoel Salles & Juliana Alves & Amelie Courau, 2016. "Overview of Chilean and Peruvian social policies: impressions from a study tour," Working Papers 148, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    11. Hoff, Karla, 2015. "Behavioral economics and social exclusion : can interventions overcome prejudice ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7198, The World Bank.
    12. Jamele Rigolini, 2016. "What can be expected from productive inclusion programs?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 301-301, October.
    13. Paula Carrasco & Rodrigo Ceni & Ivonne Perazzo & Gonzalo Salas, 2019. "Are not any silver in the cloud? Subjective well-being among deprived young people," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 19-09, Instituto de Economia - IECON.

  10. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:22, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kohei Kubota, 2021. "Partial insurance in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 72(2), pages 299-328, April.
    2. Brant Abbott, 2021. "Online Appendix to "Incomplete Markets and Parental Investments in Children"," Online Appendices 19-186, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    3. Marie C. Hull, 2017. "The time-varying role of the family in student time use and achievement," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, December.
    4. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner, 2020. "Early and Late Human Capital Investments, Borrowing Constraints, and the Family," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(3), pages 1065-1147.
    5. Agar Brugiavini & Raluca Elena Buia & Matija Kovacic & Cristina Elisa Orso, 2020. "Adverse childhood experiences and risk behaviours later in life: Evidence from SHARE countries," Working Papers 2020:08, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    6. Huebener, Mathias & Kuehnle, Daniel & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2019. "Parental leave policies and socio-economic gaps in child development: Evidence from a substantial benefit reform using administrative data," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    7. Tominey, Emma, 2016. "Female labour supply and household employment shocks: Maternity leave as an insurance mechanism," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 256-271.
    8. Robert A. Moffitt, 2020. "Reconciling Trends in U.S. Male Earnings Volatility: Results from a Four Data Set Project," NBER Working Papers 27664, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Ginja, Rita & Jans, Jenny & Karimi, Arizo, 2017. "Parental Investments in Early Life and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Swedish Parental Leave Rules," IZA Discussion Papers 11106, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Zhang, Yanan, 2021. "The role of socioeconomic status and parental investment in adolescent outcomes," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    11. Magda, Iga & Keister, Roma, 2018. "Working Time Flexibility and Parental 'Quality Time' Spent with Children," IZA Discussion Papers 11507, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. del Bono, Emilia & Francesconi, Marco, 2014. "Early Maternal Time Investment and Early Child Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 10231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2018. "Parental leave benefits, household labor supply, and children's long-run outcomes," IFS Working Papers W18/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    14. Collischon, Matthias & Kühnle, Daniel & Oberfichtner, Michael, 2020. "Cash-For-Care, or Caring for Cash? The Effects of a Home Care Subsidy on Maternal Employment, Childcare Choices, and Children's Development," IZA Discussion Papers 13271, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. von Hinke, Stephanie & Leckie, George, 2017. "Protecting energy intakes against income shocks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 210-232.
    16. Emma Tominey, 2013. "Maternity Leave and the Responsiveness of Female Labor Supply to a Household Shock," Discussion Papers 13/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    17. Robert A. Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2020. "Estimating Trends in Male Earnings Volatility with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 27674, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. C. Aina & D. Sonedda, 2018. "Investment in education and household consumption," Working Paper CRENoS 201806, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    19. Jake Anders & Francis Green & Morag Henderson & Golo Henseke, 2020. "Determinants of private school participation: all about the money?," CEPEO Working Paper Series 20-06, UCL Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, revised Feb 2020.
    20. Susanne Kuger & Jan Marcus & C. Katharina Spiess, 2017. "Does Quality of Early Childhood Education and Care Affect the Home Learning Environment of Children?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1687, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    21. Julia Rechlitz & Luis Sarmiento & Aleksandar Zaklan, 2020. "Make Sure the Kids are OK: Indirect Effects of Ground-Level Ozone on Well-Being," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1877, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    22. Kuger, Susanne & Marcus, Jan & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2019. "Day care quality and changes in the home learning environment of children," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 265-286.
    23. Camehl, Georg F. & Schober, Pia S. & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2018. "Information asymmetries between parents and educators in German childcare institutions," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-23.
    24. Stephanie von Hinke & George Leckie, 2017. "Protecting Calorie Intakes against Income Shocks," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 17/684, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    25. Mathias Huebener & Daniel Kuehnle & C. Katharina Spiess, 2017. "Paid Parental Leave and Child Development: Evidence from the 2007 German Parental Benefit Reform and Administrative Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1651, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    26. Brant Abbott, 2021. "Incomplete Markets and Parental Investments in Children," Working Paper 1452, Economics Department, Queen's University.

  11. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2012. "Long term impacts of compensatory preschool on health and behavior: evidence from Head Start," CeMMAP working papers CWP01/12, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Dietrichson, Jens & Kristiansen, Ida Lykke & C. V. Nielsen, Bjørn, 2018. "Universal preschool programs and long-term child outcomes: A systematic review," Working Paper Series 2018:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2017. "Does Universal Preschool Hit the Target? Program Access and Preschool Impacts," NBER Working Papers 23215, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner & Youngmin Park, 2017. "Correlation, Consumption, Confusion, or Constraints: Why Do Poor Children Perform so Poorly?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 102-147, January.
    4. Thomas Cornelissen & Christian Dustmann & Anna Raute & Uta Schönberg, 2018. "Who Benefits from Universal Child Care? Estimating Marginal Returns to Early Child Care Attendance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 126(6), pages 2356-2409.
    5. Yoichi Arai & Yu-Chin Hsu & Toru Kitagawa & Ismael Mourifié & Yuanyuan Wan, 2019. "Testing identifying assumptions in fuzzy regression discontinuity designs," CeMMAP working papers CWP10/19, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie & Valentina Duque, 2018. "Childhood Circumstances and Adult Outcomes: Act II," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1360-1446, December.
    7. Rucker C. Johnson & C. Kirabo Jackson, 2017. "Reducing Inequality Through Dynamic Complementarity: Evidence from Head Start and Public School Spending," NBER Working Papers 23489, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gabriella Conti & Giacomo Mason & Stavros Poupakis, 2019. "Developmental origins of health inequality," IFS Working Papers W19/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Apps, Patricia & Mendolia, Silvia & Walker, Ian, 2012. "The Impact of Pre-school on Adolescents' Outcomes: Evidence from a Recent English Cohort," IZA Discussion Papers 6971, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Hu, Jiafei & Megalokonomou, Rigissa & Yuan, Haishan, 2020. "How do parents respond to regulation of sugary drinks in child care? Evidence from California," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 672-687.
    11. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Siflinger, Bettina M., 2018. "The Effects of Day Care on Health During Childhood: Evidence by Age," IZA Discussion Papers 11447, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Chloe N. East & Sarah Miller & Marianne Page & Laura R. Wherry, 2017. "Multi-generational Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net: Early Life Exposure to Medicaid and the Next Generation’s Health," NBER Working Papers 23810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Brendon McConnell & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2015. "Going beyond simple sample size calculations: a practitioner's guide," IFS Working Papers W15/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    14. Fort, Margherita & Ichino, Andrea & Zanella, Giulio, 2016. "Cognitive and non-cognitive costs of daycare 0-2 for girls," CEPR Discussion Papers 11120, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. M. Caridad Araujo & Marta Dormal & Norbert Schady, 2019. "Childcare Quality and Child Development," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(3), pages 656-682.
    16. Kautz, Tim & Heckman, James J. & Diris, Ron & ter Weel, Bas & Borghans, Lex, 2014. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Improving Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills to Promote Lifetime Success," IZA Discussion Papers 8696, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Bhashkar Mazumder & Maria Fernanda Rosales & Margaret Triyana, 2019. "Social Interventions, Health and Wellbeing: The Long-Term and Intergenerational Effects of a School Construction Program," Working Paper Series WP-2019-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    18. Sneha Elango & Jorge Luis Garcia & James J. Heckman & Andres Hojman, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," Working Papers 2015-017, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    19. Cawley, John, 2015. "An economy of scales: A selective review of obesity's economic causes, consequences, and solutions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 244-268.
    20. Rossin-Slater, Maya & Wüst, Miriam, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-Term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 10254, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    21. Halla, Martin & Pruckner, Gerald J. & Schober, Thomas, 2016. "Cost savings of developmental screenings: Evidence from a nationwide program," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 120-135.
    22. Wendy Cunningham & Pablo Acosta & Noël Muller, 2016. "Minds and Behaviors at Work," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 24659.
    23. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool for Poor Children? Long-Term and Intergenerational Impacts and Interactions with an Infant Health Intervention," NBER Working Papers 22700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Martin Halla & Gerald Pruckner & Thomas Schober, 2015. "The Cost-Effectiveness of Developmental Screenings: Evidence from a Nationwide Programme," Working Papers 2015-09, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    25. Jonas Lau-Jensen Hirani & Hans Henrik Sievertsen & Miriam Wust, 2020. "The Timing of Early Interventions and Child and Maternal Health," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 20/720, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    26. Daniela Del Boca & Enrica Maria Martino & Daniela Piazzalunga, 2017. "Investments in Early Education and Child Outcomes: The Short and the Long Run," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(01), pages 43-48, April.
    27. James J. Heckman & Tim Kautz, 2013. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Interventions That Improve Character and Cognition," NBER Working Papers 19656, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    28. Hirani, Jonas Lau-Jensen & Sievertsen, Hans Henrik & Wüst, Miriam, 2020. "Missing a Nurse Visit," IZA Discussion Papers 13485, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
      • Miriam Wüst & Jonas Lau-Jensen Hirani & Hans Henrik Sievertsen, 2021. "Missing a Nurse Visit," CEBI working paper series 20-09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).
    29. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Douglas Almond, 2012. "Long Run Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net," NBER Working Papers 18535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    30. Thompson, Owen, 2017. "The long-term health impacts of Medicaid and CHIP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 26-40.
    31. Kuger, Susanne & Marcus, Jan & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2019. "Day care quality and changes in the home learning environment of children," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 265-286.
    32. Greve, Jane & Schultz-Nielsen, Marie Louise & Tekin, Erdal, 2015. "Fetal Malnutrition and Academic Success: Evidence from Muslim Immigrants in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 9328, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    33. Pruckner, Gerald J. & Halla, Martin & Schober, Thomas, 2015. "On the Effectiveness of Developmental Screenings: Evidence from a Nationwide Program in Austria," VfS Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113020, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    34. Blau, David M. & Haskell, Nancy L. & Haurin, Donald R., 2019. "Are housing characteristics experienced by children associated with their outcomes as young adults?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C).
    35. Basu, Bharati, 2021. "Do institutional norms affect behavioral preferences: A view from gender bias in the intra-household expenditure allocation in Iran," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 118-134.
    36. Krzysztof Karbownik & Michal Myck, 2017. "Who gets to look nice and who gets to play? Effects of child gender on household expenditures," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 925-944, September.
    37. Shuang Yang, 2021. "The Long-Run Effects of Early Childhood Education and Care—An Empirical Analysis Based on the China Family Panel Studies Survey," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 14(5), pages 2021-2044, October.
    38. Roy van der Weide & Ambar Narayan, 2019. "China and the United States: Different economic models but similarly low levels of socioeconomic mobility," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-121, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    39. Hojman, Andrés & López Bóo, Florencia, 2019. "Cost-Effective Public Daycare in a Low-Income Economy Benefits Children and Mothers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9786, Inter-American Development Bank.
    40. Denis Fougere & Arthur Heim, 2019. "L'évaluation socioéconomique de l'investissement social: Comment mettre en oeuvre des analyses coûts-bénéfices pour les politiques d'emploi, de santé et d'éducation," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5lge9h8e809, Sciences Po.
    41. van Huizen, Thomas & Plantenga, Janneke, 2018. "Do children benefit from universal early childhood education and care? A meta-analysis of evidence from natural experiments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 206-222.
    42. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2015. "Non-Cognitive Deficits and Young Adult Outcomes: The Long-Run Impacts of a Universal Child Care Program," NBER Working Papers 21571, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  12. Rita Ginja, 2010. "Income Shocks and Investments in Human Capital," 2010 Meeting Papers 1165, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Helmers & Manasa Patnam, 2014. "Does the rotten child spoil his companion? Spatial peer effects among children in rural India," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5, pages 67-121, March.
    2. Meghir, Costas & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2011. "Earnings, Consumption and Life Cycle Choices," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 9, pages 773-854, Elsevier.
    3. Gonzalez, Libertad, 2011. "The Effects of a Universal Child Benefit," IZA Discussion Papers 5994, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Yang, Guanyi, 2018. "Endogenous Skills and Labor Income Inequality," MPRA Paper 89638, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Emma Tominey, 2010. "The Timing of Parental Income and Child Outcomes: The Role of Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEE Discussion Papers 0120, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.

  13. Abrahamsen, Signe A. & Ginja, Rita & Riise, Julie, "undated". "School Health Programs: Education, Health and Welfare Dependency of Young Adults," CINCH Working Paper Series (since 2020) 74644, Duisburg-Essen University Library, DuEPublico.

    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Martin & Karlsson, Martin & Prodromidis, Nikolaos, 2021. "Long‐term Effects of Hospital Deliveries," CINCH Working Paper Series (since 2020) 74712, Duisburg-Essen University Library, DuEPublico.

Articles

  1. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2020. "Parental Leave Benefits, Household Labor Supply, and Children’s Long-Run Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 261-320.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Pedro Carneiro & Emanuela Galasso & Rita Ginja, 2019. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 129(617), pages 172-208.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2016. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(596), pages 66-95, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Long-Term Impacts of Compensatory Preschool on Health and Behavior: Evidence from Head Start," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 135-173, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 40 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (17) 2012-02-20 2012-02-27 2012-03-28 2014-05-17 2016-08-21 2017-10-29 2018-01-22 2018-08-20 2018-09-10 2018-11-19 2020-02-03 2020-11-02 2020-11-09 2021-01-25 2021-07-26 2021-08-09 2021-09-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (13) 2015-05-02 2015-05-02 2015-08-13 2016-08-21 2017-10-29 2018-01-22 2018-08-20 2018-09-10 2018-09-17 2018-11-19 2018-11-26 2018-11-26 2020-02-03. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (11) 2014-06-14 2015-02-22 2016-03-06 2016-08-21 2017-10-29 2018-01-22 2018-08-20 2018-09-10 2018-11-19 2018-11-26 2020-02-03. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (10) 2015-05-02 2016-01-18 2016-07-23 2017-11-26 2017-12-11 2018-08-20 2018-09-10 2018-11-26 2020-11-23 2020-12-07. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (10) 2012-02-27 2014-05-17 2014-06-07 2014-06-14 2015-02-22 2015-05-02 2015-05-02 2015-08-13 2016-03-06 2017-12-11. Author is listed
  6. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (8) 2017-12-11 2019-02-18 2020-11-09 2020-11-23 2020-12-07 2021-07-26 2021-08-09 2021-09-13. Author is listed
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (6) 2020-11-02 2020-11-09 2021-01-25 2021-07-26 2021-08-09 2021-09-13. Author is listed
  8. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (5) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29 2020-11-23 2020-12-07 2021-01-25. Author is listed
  9. NEP-IUE: Informal & Underground Economics (5) 2017-10-29 2018-09-10 2018-09-17 2018-11-26 2020-02-03. Author is listed
  10. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (4) 2014-06-07 2015-05-02 2017-12-11 2018-11-19
  11. NEP-EDU: Education (4) 2017-12-11 2020-11-02 2020-11-09 2021-01-25
  12. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (4) 2014-06-07 2014-06-14 2014-12-29 2015-02-22
  13. NEP-INO: Innovation (3) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  14. NEP-INT: International Trade (3) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  15. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (2) 2020-12-07 2021-01-25
  16. NEP-ISF: Islamic Finance (2) 2021-08-09 2021-09-13
  17. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29
  18. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (2) 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  19. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2017-10-29
  20. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2021-07-26

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