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Rita Ginja

Personal Details

First Name:Rita
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ginja
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgi187
https://sites.google.com/site/rcginja/

Affiliation

(86%) Institutt for Økonomi
Universitetet i Bergen

Bergen, Norway
http://www.uib.no/econ/

: (+47)55589200
(+47)55589210
Fosswinckelsgate 14, N-5007 Bergen
RePEc:edi:iouibno (more details at EDIRC)

(10%) Nationalekonomiska Institutionen
Uppsala Universitet

Uppsala, Sweden
http://www.nek.uu.se/

: + 46 18 471 25 00
+ 46 18 471 14 78
Box 513, S-751 20 UPPSALA
RePEc:edi:nekuuse (more details at EDIRC)

(4%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/

:

P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, 2017. "Who benefits from free health insurance: evidence from Mexico," IFS Working Papers W17/26, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Rita Ginja & Jenny Jans & Arizo Karimi, 2017. "Parental Investments in Early Life and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Swedish Parental Leave Rules," Working Papers 2017-085, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  3. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita, 2016. "Health Insurance and Child Health: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 10122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Bahar Baziki, Selva & Ginja, Rita & Borota Milicevic, Teodora, 2015. "Trade Competition, Technology and Labor Re-allocation," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2016:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  5. Ginja, Rita & Carneiro, Pedro & Galasso, Emanuela, 2014. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Working Paper Series 2014:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  6. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:22, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  7. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2012. "Long term impacts of compensatory preschool on health and behavior: evidence from Head Start," CeMMAP working papers CWP01/12, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Rita Ginja, 2010. "Income Shocks and Investments in Human Capital," 2010 Meeting Papers 1165, Society for Economic Dynamics.

Articles

  1. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Long-Term Impacts of Compensatory Preschool on Health and Behavior: Evidence from Head Start," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 135-173, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2015. "Partial insurance and investments in children," CeMMAP working papers CWP19/15, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Partial insurance and investments in children By: Pedro Carneiro (Institute for Fiscal Studies and cemmap and UCL) ; Rita Ginja (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Uppsala)
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2015-08-17 19:33:01
  2. Pedro Carneiro & Emanuela Galasso & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Tackling social exclusion: evidence from Chile," CeMMAP working papers CWP24/14, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Tackling social exclusion: evidence from Chile
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-04-07 18:41:47

Working papers

  1. Conti, Gabriella & Ginja, Rita, 2016. "Health Insurance and Child Health: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 10122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriella Conti & Rita Ginja, Renata Narita, 2017. "Non-Contributory Health Insurance and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2017_17, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).

  2. Bahar Baziki, Selva & Ginja, Rita & Borota Milicevic, Teodora, 2015. "Trade Competition, Technology and Labor Re-allocation," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2016:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bastani, Spencer & Blumkin, Tomer & Micheletto, Luca, 2016. "Anti-discrimination Legislation and the Efficiency-Enhancing Role of Mandatory Parental Leave," Working Paper Series 2016:7, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Ando, Michihito & Dahlberg, Matz & Engström, Gustav, 2017. "The risks of nuclear disaster and its impact on housing prices," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 13-16.
    3. Borrs, Linda & Knauth, Florian, 2016. "The impact of trade and technology on wage components," DICE Discussion Papers 241, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Laun, Tobias & Wallenius, Johanna, 2017. "Having It All? Employment, Earnings and Children," Working Paper Series 2017:6, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    5. Edoardo Di Porto & Henry Ohlsson, 2016. "Avoiding Taxes by Transfers Within the Family," CSEF Working Papers 436, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    6. Kumar, Anil & Liang, Che-Yuan, 2017. "Estimating Taxable Income Responses with Elasticity Heterogeneity," Working Paper Series 2017:5, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

  3. Ginja, Rita & Carneiro, Pedro & Galasso, Emanuela, 2014. "Tackling Social Exclusion: Evidence from Chile," Working Paper Series 2014:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Laura Abramovsky & Orazio Attanasio & Kai Barron & Pedro Carneiro & George Stoye, 2016. "Challenges to Promoting Social Inclusion of the Extreme Poor: Evidence from a Large-Scale Experiment in Colombia," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 89-141, April.
    2. Pedro Lara de Arruda & Luísa A. Nazareno & Manoel Salles & Juliana Alves & Amelie Courau, 2016. "Overview of Chilean and Peruvian social policies: impressions from a study tour," Working Papers 148, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    3. Camacho, Adriana & Cunningham, Wendy & Rigolini, Jamele & Silva, Veronica, 2014. "Addressing Access and Behavioral Constraints through Social Intermediation Services: A Review of Chile Solidario and Red Unidos," IZA Policy Papers 94, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Margherita Scarlato & Giorgio d'Agostino & Francesca Capparucci, 2016. "Evaluating CCTs from a Gender Perspective: The Impact of Chile Solidario on Women's Employment Prospect," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 177-197, March.
    5. Hoff, Karla, 2015. "Behavioral economics and social exclusion : can interventions overcome prejudice ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7198, The World Bank.
    6. Jamele Rigolini, 2016. "What can be expected from productive inclusion programs?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 301-301, October.

  4. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:22, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. von Hinke, Stephanie & Leckie, George, 2017. "Protecting energy intakes against income shocks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 210-232.
    2. Elizabeth Caucutt & Lance Lochner, 2017. "Early and Late Human Capital Investments, Borrowing Constraints, and the Family," Working Papers 2017-040, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Emma Tominey, 2013. "Maternity Leave and the Responsiveness of Female Labor Supply to a Household Shock," Working Papers 2013-016, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    4. del Bono, Emilia & Francesconi, Marco, 2014. "Early Maternal Time Investment and Early Child Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 10231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Stephanie von Hinke & George Leckie, 2017. "Protecting Calorie Intakes against Income Shocks," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 17/684, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    6. Marie C. Hull, 2017. "The time-varying role of the family in student time use and achievement," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, December.
    7. Tominey, Emma, 2016. "Female labour supply and household employment shocks: Maternity leave as an insurance mechanism," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 256-271.
    8. Susanne Kuger & Jan Marcus & C. Katharina Spiess, 2017. "Does Quality of Early Childhood Education and Care Affect the Home Learning Environment of Children?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1687, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    9. Mathias Huebener & Daniel Kuehnle & C. Katharina Spiess, 2017. "Paid Parental Leave and Child Development: Evidence from the 2007 German Parental Benefit Reform and Administrative Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1651, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

  5. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2012. "Long term impacts of compensatory preschool on health and behavior: evidence from Head Start," CeMMAP working papers CWP01/12, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2017. "Does Universal Preschool Hit the Target? Program Access and Preschool Impacts," NBER Working Papers 23215, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner & Youngmin Park, 2015. "Correlation, Consumption, Confusion, or Constraints: Why do Poor Children Perform so Poorly?," NBER Working Papers 21023, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Fort, Margherita & Ichino, Andrea & Zanella, Giulio, 2016. "Cognitive and non-cognitive costs of daycare 0-2 for girls," CEPR Discussion Papers 11120, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie & Valentina Duque, 2017. "Childhood Circumstances and Adult Outcomes: Act II," Working Papers 2017-082, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Rossin-Slater, Maya & Wüst, Miriam, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-Term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 10254, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Halla, Martin & Pruckner, Gerald J. & Schober, Thomas, 2016. "Cost savings of developmental screenings: Evidence from a nationwide program," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 120-135.
    7. James J. Heckman & Tim Kautz, 2013. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Interventions That Improve Character and Cognition," NBER Working Papers 19656, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Douglas Almond, 2012. "Long Run Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net," NBER Working Papers 18535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Apps, Patricia & Mendolia, Silvia & Walker, Ian, 2013. "The impact of pre-school on adolescents’ outcomes: Evidence from a recent English cohort," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 183-199.
    10. Sneha Elango & Jorge Luis García & James J. Heckman & Andrés Hojman, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," NBER Working Papers 21766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Elango, Sneha & García, Jorge Luis & Heckman, James J. & Hojman, Andrés, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," IZA Discussion Papers 9476, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
      • Sneha Elango & Jorge Luis Garcia & James J. Heckman & Andres Hojman, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," Working Papers 2015-017, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
      • Sneha Elango & Jorge Luis García & James J. Heckman & Andrés Hojman, 2015. "Early Childhood Education," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 2, pages 235-297 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Thompson, Owen, 2017. "The long-term health impacts of Medicaid and CHIP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 26-40.
    12. Greve, Jane & Schultz-Nielsen, Marie Louise & Tekin, Erdal, 2017. "Fetal malnutrition and academic success: Evidence from Muslim immigrants in Denmark," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 20-35.
    13. Daniela Del Boca & Enrica Maria Martino & Daniela Piazzalunga, 2017. "Investments in Early Education and Child Outcomes: The Short and the Long Run," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(1), pages 43-48, April.
    14. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2015. "Non-Cognitive Deficits and Young Adult Outcomes: The Long-Run Impacts of a Universal Child Care Program," NBER Working Papers 21571, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Chloe N. East & Sarah Miller & Marianne Page & Laura R. Wherry, 2017. "Multi-generational Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net: Early Life Exposure to Medicaid and the Next Generation’s Health," NBER Working Papers 23810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Brendon McConnell & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2015. "Going beyond simple sample size calculations: a practitioner's guide," IFS Working Papers W15/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    17. María Caridad Araujo & Marta Dormal & Norbert Schady, 2017. "Child Care Quality and Child Development," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8154, Inter-American Development Bank.
    18. Cawley, John, 2015. "An economy of scales: A selective review of obesity's economic causes, consequences, and solutions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 244-268.
    19. Wendy Cunningham & Pablo Acosta & Noël Muller, 2016. "Minds and Behaviors at Work," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 24659.
    20. Pruckner, Gerald J. & Halla, Martin & Schober, Thomas, 2015. "On the Effectiveness of Developmental Screenings: Evidence from a Nationwide Program in Austria," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113020, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    21. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "What is the Added Value of Preschool? Long-term Impacts and Interactions with a Health Intervention," NBER Working Papers 22700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Martin Halla & Gerald Pruckner & Thomas Schober, 2015. "The Cost-Effectiveness of Developmental Screenings: Evidence from a Nationwide Programme," Working Papers 2015-09, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    23. Tim Kautz & James J. Heckman & Ron Diris & Bas ter Weel & Lex Borghans, 2014. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Improving Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills to Promote Lifetime Success," OECD Education Working Papers 110, OECD Publishing.
    24. Rucker C. Johnson & C. Kirabo Jackson, 2017. "Reducing Inequality Through Dynamic Complementarity: Evidence from Head Start and Public School Spending," NBER Working Papers 23489, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. Krzysztof Karbownik & Michal Myck, 2017. "Who gets to look nice and who gets to play? Effects of child gender on household expenditures," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 925-944, September.

  6. Rita Ginja, 2010. "Income Shocks and Investments in Human Capital," 2010 Meeting Papers 1165, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Helmers & Manasa Patnam, 2010. "Does the Rotten Child Spoil His Companion? Spatial Peer Effects Among Children in Rural India," SERC Discussion Papers 0059, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    2. Libertad González, 2011. "The Effects of a Universal Child Benefit," Working Papers 574, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Emma Tominey, 2010. "The Timing of Parental Income and Child Outcomes: The Role of Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEE Discussion Papers 0120, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    4. Meghir, Costas & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2011. "Earnings, Consumption and Life Cycle Choices," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.

Articles

  1. Pedro Carneiro & Rita Ginja, 2014. "Long-Term Impacts of Compensatory Preschool on Health and Behavior: Evidence from Head Start," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 135-173, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 19 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (10) 2012-02-27 2014-05-17 2014-06-07 2014-06-14 2015-02-22 2015-05-02 2015-05-02 2015-08-13 2016-03-06 2017-12-11. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (6) 2012-02-20 2012-02-27 2012-03-28 2014-05-17 2016-08-21 2018-01-22. Author is listed
  3. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (5) 2015-05-02 2015-05-02 2015-08-13 2016-08-21 2018-01-22. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2015-05-02 2016-01-18 2016-07-23 2017-11-26 2017-12-11. Author is listed
  5. NEP-DEV: Development (4) 2014-06-14 2015-02-22 2016-03-06 2016-08-21
  6. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (4) 2014-06-07 2014-06-14 2014-12-29 2015-02-22
  7. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2014-06-07 2015-05-02 2017-12-11
  8. NEP-INO: Innovation (3) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  9. NEP-INT: International Trade (3) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  10. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29
  11. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2016-01-18 2016-02-29
  12. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (2) 2016-02-29 2016-07-23
  13. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2017-12-11
  14. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2017-12-11

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