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Cecile Wetzels

Personal Details

First Name:Cecile
Middle Name:
Last Name:Wetzels
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwe59
http://www1.fee.uva.nl/pp/cmmpwetzels/
University of Amsterdam Economics Department Roetersstraat 11 1018 WB Amsterdam The Netherlands
31 20 525 4203

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Amsterdams Instituut voor ArbeidsStudies (AIAS) (Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies)
Universiteit van Amsterdam (University of Amsterdam)

Amsterdam, Netherlands
http://www.uva-aias.net/

020-525 4199
020-525 4301
Plantage Muidergracht 12, 1018 TV Amsterdam
RePEc:edi:aiuvanl (more details at EDIRC)

Comparative Population and Gender Economics
Faculteit Economie en Bedrijfskunde (Faculty of Economics and Business)
Universiteit van Amsterdam (University of Amsterdam)

Amsterdam, Netherlands
http://www.fee.uva.nl/vak_groep/vbee/


+31205254254
Roetersstraat 11, 1018 WB Amsterdam
RePEc:edi:cpuvanl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Are Workers in the Cultural Industries Paid Differently?," IZA Discussion Papers 2821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "First Time Parents’ Paid Work Patterns in Amsterdam: Father’s Part-Time Work, Family’s Immigrant Background and Mother’s Work for Pay When the Infant Is Very Young," IZA Discussion Papers 2853, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Aidis, Ruta & Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Self-Employment and Parenthood: Exploring the Impact of Partners, Children and Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 2813, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Cécile Wetzels & Aslan Zorlu, 2003. "Wage effects of motherhood: a double selection approach," NIMA Working Papers 22, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
  5. Siv S. Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels, 2002. "Postponement of Maternity and the Duration of Time Spent at Home after First Birth: Panel Data Analyses Comparing Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands and Sweden," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 59, OECD Publishing.

Articles

  1. Cecile Wetzels, 2008. "Are workers in the cultural industries paid differently?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 32(1), pages 59-77, March.
  2. Cecile Wetzels, 2005. "Supply and Price of Childcare and Female Labour Force Participation in the Netherlands," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(s1), pages 171-209, December.
  3. Cécile Wetzels & Kea Tijdens, 2002. "Dutch mothers' return to work and the re-entry effect on wage," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 45(2), pages 169-189.
  4. Siv S. Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cécile Wetzels, 2001. "Does Part-Time and Intermittent Work during Early Motherhood Lead to Regular Work Later?: A comparison of Labor Behavior of Mothers with Young Children in Germany, Britain, The Netherlands and Sweden," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 15-23.
  5. Siv S. Gustafsson & Shirley Dex & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels & Jan Dirk Vlasblom, 1996. "Women`s labor force transitions in connection with childbirth: A panel data comparison between Germany, Sweden and Great Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 223-246.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Are Workers in the Cultural Industries Paid Differently?," IZA Discussion Papers 2821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Françoise Benhamou, 2011. "Artists’ Labour Markets," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Cultural Economics, Second Edition, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Brinja Meiseberg, 2014. "Trust the artist versus trust the tale: performance implications of talent and self-marketing in folk music," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(1), pages 9-42, February.
    3. Ricardo da Silva Freguglia & Amir Borges Ferreira Neto, 2017. "How Much Does Talent Matter? Evidence from the Brazilian Formal Cultural Industry," Working Papers 17-07, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

  2. Aidis, Ruta & Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Self-Employment and Parenthood: Exploring the Impact of Partners, Children and Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 2813, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Oliveira, Belkis & Moriano, Juan & Soares, Vasco, 2012. "Estudo exploratório das diferenças na Intenção Empreendedora entre Homens e Mulheres em Portugal: o Caso dos Jovens Universitários do Norte de Portugal," Working Papers 24/2012, Universidade Portucalense, Centro de Investigação em Gestão e Economia (CIGE).
    2. Bögenhold, Dieter & Fachinger, Uwe, 2014. "Rationality of Self-Employment: Do Female and Male Entrepreneurs Differ?," MPRA Paper 58116, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Bögenhold, Dieter & Fachinger, Uwe, 2013. "Weibliche Solo-Selbstständigkeit zwischen Notwendigkeit und Innovationsherausforderung: Beobachtungen über Geschlecht und Unternehmertum in Deutschland
      [Female Solo-Self-Employment Between Necessit
      ," MPRA Paper 51460, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Anna Matysiak & Monika Mynarska, 2013. "Women’s self-employment in Poland: A strategy for combining work and childcare?," Working Papers 68, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

  3. Cécile Wetzels & Aslan Zorlu, 2003. "Wage effects of motherhood: a double selection approach," NIMA Working Papers 22, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.

    Cited by:

    1. Lia Pacelli & Silvia Pasqua & Claudia Villosio, 2007. "What does the stork bring to women's working career?," CHILD Working Papers wp16_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    2. Anabela Botelho & Lígia Costa Pinto, 2001. "Hypothetical, real, and predicted real willingness to pay in open-ended surveys: experimental results," NIMA Working Papers 12, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    3. Aslan Zorlu & Joop Hartog, 2005. "The effect of immigration on wages in three european countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 113-151, December.
    4. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai & Hélène Périvier, 2004. "The relative generosity of the EU-15 members states' child policies," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9293, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Paulo Guimaraes, 2001. "The state of Portuguese research in economics: an anlysis based on publications in international journals," NIMA Working Papers 15, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    6. Usamah Fayez Al-Farhan, 2010. "Changes in the Gender Wage Gap in Germany during a Period of Rising Wage Inequality 1999-2006: Was it Discrimination in the Returns to Human Capital?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 293, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Ying Cao & Yuehua Zhang, 2012. "Hog insurance adoption and suppliers' discrimination: A bivariate probit model with partial observability," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 233-255, May.
    8. Botelho, Anabela & Pinto, Ligia Costa, 2004. "Students' expectations of the economic returns to college education: results of a controlled experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 645-653, December.
    9. Pinto, Ligia M. & Harrison, Glenn W., 2003. "Multilateral negotiations over climate change policy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(9), pages 911-930, December.
    10. Anabela Botelho, 2001. "Strategic behavior at trial-The production, reporting, and evaluation of complex evidence," NIMA Working Papers 14, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    11. Joao Cerejeira da Silva, 2002. "Identification of the Portuguese industrial districts," NIMA Working Papers 17, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    12. David Marmet, 2004. "Growth of New Firms: Which Factors Influence Post-Entry Performance? An Empirical Analysis Based on Swiss Firm Data," KOF Working papers 04-97, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    13. Bertrand, Olivier & Hakkala, Katariina & Norbäck, Pehr-Johan, 2007. "Cross-Border Acquisition or Greenfield Entry: Does it Matter for Affiliate R&D?," Working Paper Series 693, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    14. Elvira Lima & Teresa J. Esquerdo, 2003. "The economic costs of alcohol misuse in Portugal," NIMA Working Papers 24, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    15. Pedro Portugal & Ana Rute Cardoso, 2001. "Disentangling the minimum wage puzzle: an analysis of job accessions and separations from a longitudinal matched employer- employee data set," NIMA Working Papers 9, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    16. Ana Rute Cardoso & Priscila Ferreira, 2009. "The dynamics of job creation and destruction for university graduates: why a rising unemployment rate can be misleading," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(19), pages 2513-2521.
    17. Elvira Lima & David K. Whynes, 2003. "Finance and performance of Portuguese hospitals," NIMA Working Papers 20, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    18. Fontaine, Roméo, 2011. "Le soutien familial aux personnes âgées dépendantes : Analyses micro-économétriques des comportements individuels et familiaux de prise en charge," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/7370 edited by Gramain, Agnès & Wittwer, Jérôme, December.
    19. Anabela Botelho & Lígia Costa Pinto & Miguel Portela & Antonio Silva, 2001. "The determinants of success in university entrance," NIMA Working Papers 13, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
    20. Lia Pacelli & Silvia Pasqua & Claudia Villosio, 2013. "Labor Market Penalties for Mothers in Italy," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 408-432, December.
    21. Danièle Meulders & Siv Gustavsson, 2006. "The rationale of motherhood choices: influence of employment conditions and public policies :MOCHO," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7734, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  4. Siv S. Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels, 2002. "Postponement of Maternity and the Duration of Time Spent at Home after First Birth: Panel Data Analyses Comparing Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands and Sweden," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 59, OECD Publishing.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Del Boca & Marilena Locatelli, 2006. "The Determinants of Motherhood and Work Status: a Survey," CHILD Working Papers wp15_06, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    2. Chad Steinberg & Masato Nakane, 2012. "Can Women Save Japan?," IMF Working Papers 12/248, International Monetary Fund.

Articles

  1. Cecile Wetzels, 2008. "Are workers in the cultural industries paid differently?," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 32(1), pages 59-77, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Cecile Wetzels, 2005. "Supply and Price of Childcare and Female Labour Force Participation in the Netherlands," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(s1), pages 171-209, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Christina Gathmann & Björn Sass, 2012. "Taxing Childcare: Effects on Family Labor Supply and Children," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 438, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "First Time Parents’ Paid Work Patterns in Amsterdam: Father’s Part-Time Work, Family’s Immigrant Background and Mother’s Work for Pay When the Infant Is Very Young," IZA Discussion Papers 2853, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Cristina Borra, 2010. "Childcare cost and Spanish mother’s labour force participation," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 194(3), pages 9-40, October.
    4. Aidis, Ruta & Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "Self-Employment and Parenthood: Exploring the Impact of Partners, Children and Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 2813, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ross Guest & Nick Parr, 2013. "Family policy and couples’ labour supply: an empirical assessment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1631-1660, October.
    6. Fenglian Du & Xiao-yuan Dong, 2013. "Women's Employment and Child Care Choices in Urban China during the Economic Transition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(1), pages 131-155.
    7. Edwin van Gameren, 2013. "The Role of Economic Incentives and Attitudes in Participation and Childcare Decisions," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 296-313, September.
    8. Edwin van Gameren & Ingrid Ooms, 2009. "Childcare and labor force participation in the Netherlands: the importance of attitudes and opinions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 395-421, December.
    9. Y.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344727963 Akgündüz & J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071772944 Plantenga, 2015. "Childcare Prices and Maternal Employment: a Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 15-14, Utrecht School of Economics.

  3. Cécile Wetzels & Kea Tijdens, 2002. "Dutch mothers' return to work and the re-entry effect on wage," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 45(2), pages 169-189.

    Cited by:

    1. Wetzels, Cécile, 2007. "First Time Parents’ Paid Work Patterns in Amsterdam: Father’s Part-Time Work, Family’s Immigrant Background and Mother’s Work for Pay When the Infant Is Very Young," IZA Discussion Papers 2853, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Helen Russell & Philip J. O’Connell, 2004. "Women Returning to Employment, Education and Training in Ireland - An Analysis of Transitions," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 35(1), pages 1-25.

  4. Siv S. Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cécile Wetzels, 2001. "Does Part-Time and Intermittent Work during Early Motherhood Lead to Regular Work Later?: A comparison of Labor Behavior of Mothers with Young Children in Germany, Britain, The Netherlands and Sweden," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 15-23.

    Cited by:

    1. Guido Heineck, 2002. "Does Religion Influence the Labour Supply of Married Women in Germany?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 278, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Siv Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cecile Wetzels, 2001. "Employment Choices and Pay Differences between Non-Standard and Standard Work in Britain, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 01-086/3, Tinbergen Institute.

  5. Siv S. Gustafsson & Shirley Dex & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels & Jan Dirk Vlasblom, 1996. "Women`s labor force transitions in connection with childbirth: A panel data comparison between Germany, Sweden and Great Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 223-246.

    Cited by:

    1. Kuhnt, Anne-Kristin & Buhr, Petra, 2016. "Biographical risks and their impact on uncertainty in fertility expectations: A gender-specific study based on the German Family Panel," Duisburger Beiträge zur soziologischen Forschung 2016-03, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Sociology.
    2. Jan Ondrich & C. Spiess & Qing Yang & Gert Wagner, 2003. "The Liberalization of Maternity Leave Policy and the Return to Work after Childbirth in Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 77-110, January.
    3. C. Spiess & Katharina Wrohlich, 2008. "The Parental Leave Benefit Reform in Germany: Costs and Labour Market Outcomes of Moving towards the Nordic Model," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(5), pages 575-591, October.
    4. Neumeier, Christian & Sorensen, Todd A. & Webber, Douglas A., 2017. "The Implicit Costs of Motherhood over the Lifecycle: Cross-Cohort Evidence from Administrative Longitudinal Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10558, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Lia Pacelli & Silvia Pasqua & Claudia Villosio, 2007. "What does the stork bring to women's working career?," CHILD Working Papers wp16_07, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    6. Gerda R. Neyer, 2006. "Family policies and fertility in Europe: fertility policies at the intersection of gender policies, employment policies and care policies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Ghazala Naz, 2010. "Effect of a Family Policy Reform on Immigrants' Labour Supply and Earnings," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(1), pages 74-92, March.
    8. Schulze Buschoff, Karin, 1999. "Teilzeitarbeit im europäischen Vergleich: Individuelle Dynamik, Haushaltskontext, Wohlfahrtserträge," Study / edition der Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Düsseldorf, volume 10, number 10.
    9. Hanel Barbara & Riphahn Regina T., 2012. "The Employment of Mothers – Recent Developments and their Determinants in East and West Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 232(2), pages 146-176, April.
    10. Kluve, Jochen & Tamm, Marcus, 2009. "Now Daddy's Changing Diapers and Mommy's Making Her Career: Evaluating a Generous Parental Leave Regulation Using a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 4500, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Isis Gaddis & Stephan Klasen, 2013. "Economic Development, Structural Change and Women’s Labor Force Participation A Reexamination of the Feminization U Hypothesis," Working Papers 1302, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    12. Geyer, Johannes & Steiner, Viktor, 2007. "Short-Run and Long-Term Effects of Childbirth on Mothers’ Employment and Working Hours Across Institutional Regimes: An Empirical Analysis Based on the European Community Household Panel," IZA Discussion Papers 2693, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. C. Katharina Spieß & Katharina Wrohlich, 2006. "The Parental Leave Benefit Reform in Germany: Costs and Labour Market Outcomes of Moving towards the Scandinavian Model," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 630, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Weber, Andrea Maria, 2004. "Wann kehren junge Mütter auf den Arbeitsmarkt zurück? : eine Verweildaueranalyse für Deutschland," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 22617, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    15. Maria Stanfors, 2006. "Labor Force Transitions after Childbirth Among Five Birth Cohorts in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 287-309, June.
    16. Bernd Fitzenberger & Katrin Sommerfeld & Susanne Steffes, 2013. "Causal Effects on Employment after First Birth: A Dynamic Treatment Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 576, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    17. Julie Hotchkiss & M. Pitts & Mary Walker, 2011. "Labor force exit decisions of new mothers," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 397-414, September.
    18. Daniela Del Boca & Marilena Locatelli, 2006. "The Determinants of Motherhood and Work Status: a Survey," CHILD Working Papers wp15_06, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    19. Stefan Bender & Annette Kohlmann & Stefan Lang, 2003. "Women, work, and motherhood: changing employment penalties for motherhood in West Germany after 1945 - a comparative analysis of cohorts born in 1934-1971," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    20. Merle Kreibaum & Stephan Klasen, 2015. "Missing Men: Differential Effects of War and Socialism on Female Labour Force Participation in Vietnam," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 181, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    21. Schulze Buschoff, Karin, 1999. "Teilzeitarbeit in Schweden, Großbritannien und Deutschland: Individuelle Dynamik und Haushaltskontext im Ländervergleich," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Social Structure and Social Reporting FS III 99-406, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    22. Li Ma, 2014. "Economic crisis and women’s labor force return after childbirth: Evidence from South Korea," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(18), pages 511-552, August.
    23. Karsten Hank, 2004. "Effects of Early Life Family Events on Women’s Late Life Labour Market Behaviour: An Analysis of the Relationship between Childbearing and Retirement in Western Germany," MEA discussion paper series 04047, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    24. Julia Bredtmann & Jochen Kluve & Sandra Schaffner, 2013. "Mothers' Transitions into the Labor Market under Two Political Systems: Comparing East and West Germany before Reunification," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 133(3), pages 375-408.
    25. Siv Gustafsson & Eiko Kenjoh & Cecile Wetzels, 2001. "Employment Choices and Pay Differences between Non-Standard and Standard Work in Britain, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 01-086/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    26. Nadiya Kelle, 2011. "Wandel von Erwerbsbeteilung westdeutscher Frauen nach der Erstgeburt: ein Vergleich der zwischen 1936 und 1965 geborenen Kohorten," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 406, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    27. Louise Grogan, 2006. "An Economic Examination of the Post-Transition Fertility Decline in Russia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 363-397.
    28. Gutiérrez-Domènech, Maria, 2003. "Employment after motherhood: a European comparison," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20046, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    29. Pylkkänen, Elina & Smith, Nina, 2004. "Career Interruptions due to Parental Leave - A Comparative Study of Denmark and Sweden," Working Papers 04-1, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    30. Jürgen Kolb & Axel Werwatz, 2001. "The Duration of Marginal Employment in West Germany: A Survival Analysis Based on Spell Data," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(1), pages 95-101.
    31. Irene Lapuerta & Pau Baizán & María González, 2011. "Individual and Institutional Constraints: An Analysis of Parental Leave Use and Duration in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(2), pages 185-210, April.
    32. Sperlich, Stefanie & Geyer, Siegfried, 2015. "The mediating effect of effort-reward imbalance in household and family work on the relationship between education and women's health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 58-65.
    33. Gutierrez-Domenech, Maria, 2005. "Employment after motherhood: a European comparison," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 99-123, February.
    34. Pronzato, Chiara, 2007. "Return to work after childbirth: does parental leave matter in Europe?," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-30, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    35. Adsera, Alicia, 2005. "Where Are the Babies? Labor Market Conditions and Fertility in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1576, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    36. Jochen Kluve & Marcus Tamm, 2013. "Parental leave regulations, mothers’ labor force attachment and fathers’ childcare involvement: evidence from a natural experiment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(3), pages 983-1005, July.
    37. Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2010. "Labour Market Status, Transitions and Gender: a European Perspective," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00616799, HAL.
    38. Naz, Ghazala, 2006. "Effect of Cash-Benefit Reform on Immigrants’ Labour Supply and Earnings," Working Papers in Economics 13/06, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    39. Cordula Zabel, 2006. "Employment experience and first birth in Great Britain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    40. Melanie Arntz & Stephan Dlugosz & Ralf A. Wilke, 2017. "The Sorting of Female Careers after First Birth: A Competing Risks Analysis of Maternity Leave Duration," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(5), pages 689-716, October.
    41. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
    42. Kuhlenkasper, Torben & Kauermann, Göran, 2010. "Duration of maternity leave in Germany: A case study of nonparametric hazard models and penalized splines," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 466-473, June.
    43. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Nina Smith & Mette Verner, 2008. "PERSPECTIVE ARTICLE: The impact of Nordic countries’ family friendly policies on employment, wages, and children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 65-89, March.
    44. Sarkar, Sudipa & Sahoo, Soham & Klasen, Stephan, 2017. "Employment Transitions of Women in India: A Panel Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 11086, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    45. Mette Ejrnæs & Astrid Kunze, 2002. "Wage dips and drops around the first birth," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 C2-4, International Conferences on Panel Data.
    46. Torben Kuhlenkasper & Göran Kauermann, 2009. "Duration of Maternity Leave in Germany: A Case Study of Nonparametric Hazard Models and Penalized Splines," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 213, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    47. Esther Geisler & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2009. "Against all odds: fathers’ use of parental leave in Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    48. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Walker, Mary Beth, 2011. "To work or not to work: the economics of a mother's dilemma," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2011-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    49. Jérôme De Henau & Danièle Meulders & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai, 2006. "The comparative effectiveness of public policies to fight motherhood-induced employment penalties and decreasing fertility in the former EU-15," DULBEA Working Papers 0026, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    50. Sergi Vidal & Francisco Perales & Philipp M. Lersch & Maria Brandén, 2017. "Family migration in a cross-national perspective: The importance of institutional and cultural context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(10), pages 307-338, January.
    51. Maria Gutierrez-Domenech, 2003. "Employment After Motherhood: A European Comparison," CEP Discussion Papers dp0567, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    52. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Family policies and low fertility in Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    53. Ann-Christin Bächmann & Dörthe Gatermann, 2017. "The duration of family-related employment interruptions – the role of occupational characteristics
      [Die Bedeutung des Berufs für die Dauer von Erwerbsunterbrechungen nach der Geburt des ersten Kind
      ," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 50(1), pages 143-160, August.
    54. Dustmann, Christian & Schönberg, Uta, 2008. "The Effect of Expansions in Maternity Leave Coverage on Children's Long-Term Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 3605, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    55. Pylkkänen, Elina & Smith, Nina, 2004. "The Impact of Family-Friendly Policies in Denmark and Sweden on Mothers' Career Interruptions Due to Childbirth," IZA Discussion Papers 1050, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    56. Neyer, Gerda, 2003. "Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe," Discussion Paper 161, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    57. Hong, Ying & Corman, Diana, 2005. "Women´s Return to Work after First Birth in Sweden during 1980-2000," Arbetsrapport 2005:19, Institute for Futures Studies.
    58. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Smith, Nina & Verner, Mette, 2006. "Child Care and Parental Leave in the Nordic Countries: A Model to Aspire to?," IZA Discussion Papers 2014, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2003-07-10 2007-06-30 2007-07-07
  2. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2007-07-07
  3. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (1) 2007-07-07
  4. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2007-06-30
  5. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2007-06-30
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2007-07-07

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