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Women Returning to Employment, Education and Training in Ireland - An Analysis of Transitions

Author

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  • Helen Russell

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

  • Philip J. O’Connell

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

Recent improvements in the Irish labour market have led to a substantial increase in the labour force participation rate of women in Ireland. Part of this increase has been fuelled by women moving from the home into paid employment. Much of the existing research on labour market activity among Irish women has focused on cross-sectional analyses of the stock of labour market participants. In this paper we aim to address some of the gaps in the literature by investigating the transition from home to work, and from home to education, training and employment schemes among women in Ireland during the period 1994 to 1999. We adopt a dynamic approach by drawing on the nationally representative longitudinal data in the Living in Ireland Survey. This allows us to provide, for the first time, a representative profile of returners, and to formally model the transition process in terms of supply and demand factors. The analysis also investigates the factors associated with the return to part-versus full-time work. Our analysis reveals that about one-quarter of those engaged full-time in home duties in 1994 had made a transition to paid work within the six-year period 1994-1999. The study identifies a number of key factors that influence the transition from home to work or education, training and employment schemes, including, on the supply side, age, education, previous work experience, time out of the labour force, and the presence of young children in the household, and on the demand side, macro-economic conditions and urban versus rural residence.

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Russell & Philip J. O’Connell, 2004. "Women Returning to Employment, Education and Training in Ireland - An Analysis of Transitions," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 35(1), pages 1-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:35:y:2004:i:1:p:1-25
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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol35_1Russell.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philip J. O'Connell & Vanessa Gash, 2003. "The Effects of Working Time, Segmentation and Labour Market Mobility on Wages and Pensions in Ireland," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(1), pages 71-95, March.
    2. Layte, Richard & Maitre, Bernard & Nolan, Brian & Watson, Dorothy & Williams, James & Casey, Barra, 2001. "Monitoring Poverty Trends and Exploring Poverty Dynamics in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS41.
    3. Denny, Kevin & Harmon, Colm & O'Connell, Philip J., 2000. "Investing in People: The Labour Market Impact of Human Resource Interventions Funded under the 1994-1999 Community Support Framework in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS38.
    4. Cécile Wetzels & Kea Tijdens, 2002. "Dutch mothers' return to work and the re-entry effect on wage," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 45(2), pages 169-189.
    5. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext16 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Seamus McGuinness & Frances McGinnity & Philip J. O'Connell, 2009. "Changing Returns to Education During a Boom? The Case of Ireland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 197-221, March.
    2. Elish Kelly & Seamus McGuinness & Philip J O’connell & David Haugh & Alberto GonzÁlez Pandiella, 2014. "Transitions In and Out of Unemployment among Young People in the Irish Recession," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 56(4), pages 616-634, December.
    3. Byrne, Stephen & O'Brien, Martin D., 2016. "Understanding Irish Labour Force Participation," Research Technical Papers 01/RT/16, Central Bank of Ireland.
    4. repec:eso:journl:v:48:y:2017:i:1:p:27-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Russell, Helen & Layte, Richard & Maitre, Bertrand & O'Connell, Philip J. & Whelan, Christopher T., 2004. "Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS52.
    6. Russell, Helen & Quinn, Emma & King O'Riain, Rebecca & McGinnity, Frances, 2008. "The Experience of Discrimination in Ireland: Analysis of the QNHS Equality Module," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT120.
    7. Helen Russell & Brendan Halpin & Mattias Strandh & Andrea Zielfe, 2006. "Comparing the Labour Market Effects of Childbirth in Ireland, Sweden, the UK and Germany," Papers WP170, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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