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Labour Market Participation of French Women over the Life Cycle, 1935–1990

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Grimm

    (Déeveloppement et insertion internationale (DIAL)
    Institut d'études politiques de Paris)

  • Noël Bonneuil

    (Institut national d'études démographiques
    École des hautes études en sciences sociales)

Abstract

Employment histories with multiple spells and time varyingcovariates help identify determinants of labour markettransitions of women in France between 1935 and 1990. Higher educatedwomen were more likely to become inactive, but returned to work also moreeasily, especially when they added work experience. Being married,whether mother or not, induced a rearrangement of time betweenstaying at home and labour, in rendering exit from employment morelikely and return from inactivity to employment less likely. Exits from employment were lessfrequent for mothers of larger families, while return toemployment decreased with the total number of children, in spite of thegrowing financial needs of larger families. Transitions betweenemployment and inactivity increased with favourable economicconditions. However, involuntary exits from employment were moreprobable during economic downturns.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Grimm & Noël Bonneuil, 2001. "Labour Market Participation of French Women over the Life Cycle, 1935–1990," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 17(3), pages 235-260, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eurpop:v:17:y:2001:i:3:d:10.1023_a:1011873830194
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1011873830194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2008. "Fertility and Women’s Employment: A Meta-analysis," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 24(4), pages 363-384, December.

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