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Mothers in an Insider-Outsider Economy: The Puzzle of Spain

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  • Adam, Paula

Abstract

There is growing evidence that social policies toward mothers have important effects on their labor market behavior. This article argues that these effects are less important in a Male Breadwinner Regime if there is employment insecurity in the household or if women intend to participate in the long-run. I consider the case of Spain, where the workforce has become polarized between insiders and outsiders and where social policies closely resemble the Male Breadwinner Regime. The results show that Spanish mothers fall into two groups: those who do not withdraw from the labor force after childbirth and those who withdraw and do not re-enter after their children arrive at school age. Entry or re-entry appears related to the husband's employment uncertainty. Married women in an "insider household" are less likely to be mobile than women in an "outsider household."

Suggested Citation

  • Adam, Paula, 1996. "Mothers in an Insider-Outsider Economy: The Puzzle of Spain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 301-323, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:9:y:1996:i:3:p:301-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel Flores & Adriaan Kalwij, 2014. "The associations between early life circumstances and later life health and employment in Europe," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 1251-1282.
    2. Magdalena M. Muszynska, 2004. "Employment after childbearing: a comparative study of Italy and Norway," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-030, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Angela Cipollone & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2008. "Discriminating Factors of Women's Employment. Using Territorial Heterogeneity to Inform Policy," Quaderni DEF 145, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    4. Daniel Fernandez, 2009. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Working Papers Economia wp09-04, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
    5. Pablo Branas-Garza & Máximo Rossi & Dayna Zaclicever, 2009. "Individual's Religiosity Enhances Trust: Latin American Evidence for the Puzzle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(2-3), pages 555-566, March.
    6. Pablo Brañas-Garza & Shoshana Neuman, 2006. "Is fertility related to religiosity?-Evidence from Spain," Papers on Economics of Religion 06/06, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    7. Fernández-Kranz, Daniel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2011. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 591-606, October.
    8. Gutiérrez-Domènech, Maria, 2003. "Employment after motherhood: a European comparison," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20046, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Maria Gutierrez-Domenech, 2003. "Employment After Motherhood: A European Comparison," CEP Discussion Papers dp0567, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    10. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2014. "Determinants of Employment Decisions After the First Child Birth in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 214-227, June.
    11. Maria Gutierrez-Domenech, 2002. "Employment Penalty After Motherhood In Spain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0546, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
    13. Paula Adam, "undated". "Careers or Stop Gap Work? Panel Data Analysis of Wives' Labour Supply Choices in Spain," Working Papers 104, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    14. Alicia Adsera, 2011. "The interplay of employment uncertainty and education in explaining second births in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(16), pages 513-544, August.
    15. Angela Cipollone & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2009. "Women's Employment: Beyond Individual Characteristics vs. Contextual Factors Explanations," Working Papers CELEG 0901, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    16. Irene Lapuerta & Pau Baizán & María González, 2011. "Individual and Institutional Constraints: An Analysis of Parental Leave Use and Duration in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(2), pages 185-210, April.
    17. Paula Adam, "undated". "Mobility of Married Women. Non-Parametric Analysis of Labour Force Transitions in Spain," Working Papers 112, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    18. Quintana-Domeque, Climent & Bozzoli, Carlos & Bosch, Mariano, 2012. "The evolution of adult height across Spanish regions, 1950–1980: A new source of data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 264-275.
    19. Alfonso R. Sanchez Martín & Virginia SanchezMarcos, 2010. "Demographic Change and Pension Reform in Spain: An Assessment in a Two-Earner, OLG Model," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, pages 405-452.
    20. Gutiérrez-Domènech, Maria, 2002. "Employment penalty after motherhood in Spain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20068, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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