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The effects of parental leave extension on training for young women


  • Patrick Puhani


  • Katja Sonderhof


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Puhani & Katja Sonderhof, 2011. "The effects of parental leave extension on training for young women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 731-760, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:24:y:2011:i:2:p:731-760
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-009-0295-y

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2000. "Parental leave and child health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 931-960, November.
    2. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 622-641, June.
    3. Ondrich, Jan & Spiess, C Katharina & Yang, Qing, 1996. "Barefoot and in a German Kitchen: Federal Parental Leave and Benefit Policy and the Return to Work after Childbirth in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 247-266, August.
    4. Puhani, Patrick A. & Sonderhof, Katja, 2008. "The Effects of Maternity Leave Extension on Training for Young Women," IZA Discussion Papers 3820, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Edward P. Lazear, 1990. "Job Security Provisions and Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 699-726.
    6. Rafael Lalive & Josef Zweim�ller, "undated". "Does Parental Leave Affect Fertility and Return-to-Work? Evidence from a �True Natural Experiment�," IEW - Working Papers 242, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    7. Lawrence M. Berger & Jane Waldfogel, 2004. "Maternity leave and the employment of new mothers in the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 331-349, June.
    8. Joseph E. Zveglich & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2003. "The Impact of Protective Measures for Female Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 533-556, July.
    9. Weber, Andrea Maria, 2004. "Wann kehren junge Mütter auf den Arbeitsmarkt zurück? : eine Verweildaueranalyse für Deutschland," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 22617, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    10. Schönberg, Uta & Ludsteck, Johannes, 2007. "Maternity Leave Legislation, Female Labor Supply, and the Family Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 2699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Miriam Maeder, 2014. "Earnings-related parental leave benefits and subjective well-being of young mothers: evidence from a German parental leave reform," Working Papers 148, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    2. Juan J. Dolado & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Sara De La Rica, 2013. "On Gender Gaps And Self-Fulfilling Expectations: Alternative Implications Of Paid-For Training," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(3), pages 1829-1848, July.
    3. Alena Bičáková, 2016. "Gender unemployment gaps in the EU: blame the family," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-31, December.
    4. Guertzgen, Nicole & Hank, Karsten, 2014. "Maternity leave and mothers' long-term sickness absence: Evidence from Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-109, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Grund, Christian, 2015. "Gender pay gaps among highly educated professionals — Compensation components do matter," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 118-126.
    6. Amaia Altuzarra, 2015. "Measuring Unemployment Persistence by Age and Gender," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 110-133, December.
    7. C. Katharina Spieß, 2011. "Vereinbarkeit von Familie und Beruf – wie wirksam sind deutsche „Care Policies“?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(s1), pages 4-27, May.
    8. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Muehler, Grit, 2011. "Dips and floors in workplace training: Using personnel records to estimate gender differences," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-023, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. Diener, Katharina & Susanne, Götz & Schreyer, Franziska & Stephan, Gesine & Lenhart, Julia & Nisic, Natascha & Stöhr, Julia, 2015. "Rückkehr ins Berufsleben nach familienbedingter Unterbrechung : Befunde der Evaluation der zweiten Förderperiode des ESF-Programms "Perspektive Wiedereinstieg" des Bundesministeriums für Fam," IAB-Forschungsbericht 201507, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item


    Policy; Evaluation; Education; J16; J24; J83;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J83 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Workers' Rights


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