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The Impact of Paid Maternity Leave on Labour Market Outcomes

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  • Barbara Hanel

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

I estimate the effect of paid maternity leave on mothers probability of employment after birth, how this effect varies with the age of the child, and the effect on wages when the child is about four years old. A statistical matching approach is applied. The matching procedure controls for an extensive range of pre-birth job characteristics, health and human capital measures, and attitudes towards nonmaternal care. Mothers appear to delay their return to work after a birth if they are entitled to paid maternity leave, but the delay is short and does not affect wages in the long-run.

Suggested Citation

  • Barbara Hanel, 2012. "The Impact of Paid Maternity Leave on Labour Market Outcomes," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2012n19
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2012n19.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Maternity leave; maternal employment; maternal wages.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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