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Parental leave policies and parents' employment and leave-taking

Author

Listed:
  • Wen-Jui Han

    (Social Work, Columbia University School of Social Work)

  • Christopher Ruhm

    (University of North Carolina Greensboro)

  • Jane Waldfogel

    (Social Work, Columbia University School of Social Work)

Abstract

We describe trends in maternal employment and leave-taking after birth of a newborn and analyze the extent to which these behaviors are influenced by parental leave policies. Data are from the June Current Population Survey (CPS) Fertility Supplements, merged with other months of the CPS, and cover the period 1987 to 1994. This time span is one during which parental leave legislation expanded at both the state and federal level. We also provide the first comprehensive examination of employment and leave-taking by fathers of infants. Our main finding is that leave expansions are associated with increased leave-taking by both mothers and fathers. The magnitudes of the changes are small in absolute terms but large relative to the baseline for men and much greater for college-educated or married mothers than for their less-educated or single counterparts. © 2009 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

Suggested Citation

  • Wen-Jui Han & Christopher Ruhm & Jane Waldfogel, 2009. "Parental leave policies and parents' employment and leave-taking," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 29-54.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:28:y:2009:i:1:p:29-54
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.20398
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20398
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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