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Parental leave: The impact of recent legislation on parents’ leave taking

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  • Wen-Jui Han
  • Jane Waldfogel

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  • Wen-Jui Han & Jane Waldfogel, 2003. "Parental leave: The impact of recent legislation on parents’ leave taking," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 191-200, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:40:y:2003:i:1:p:191-200
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2003.0003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1998. "The Economic Consequences of Parental Leave Mandates: Lessons from Europe," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 285-317.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles L. Baum II & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2016. "The Effects of Paid Family Leave in California on Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(2), pages 333-356, April.
    2. Wen-Jui Han & Christopher Ruhm & Jane Waldfogel, 2009. "Parental leave policies and parents' employment and leave-taking," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 29-54.
    3. Sonya Britt & R. Roy, 2014. "Relationship Quality Among Young Couples from an Economic and Gender Perspective," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 241-250, June.
    4. Rafael Lalive & Analía Schlosser & Andreas Steinhauer & Josef Zweimüller, 2014. "Parental Leave and Mothers' Careers: The Relative Importance of Job Protection and Cash Benefits," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 219-265.
    5. Derek T. Tharp & Elizabeth J. Parks-Stamm, 2021. "Gender Differences in the Intended Use of Parental Leave: Implications for Human Capital Development," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 47-60, March.
    6. Maya Rossin-Slater, 2017. "Maternity and Family Leave Policy," NBER Working Papers 23069, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Guyonne Kalb, 2018. "Paid Parental Leave and Female Labour Supply: AÂ Review," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 94(304), pages 80-100, March.
    8. Hamish Low & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2015. "Female labour market outcomes and the impact of maternity leave policies," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-22, December.
    9. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 221-242.
    10. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L’impact de la maternité sur l’activité des femmes aux Etats-Unis," Post-Print hal-03461894, HAL.
    11. Ana Espinola-Arredondo & Sunita Mondal, 2009. "The effect of parental leave on female employment: evidence from state policies," Working Papers 2008-15, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
    12. Julio E. Romero Prieto, 2018. "La maternidad y el empleo formal en Colombia," Documentos de Trabajo Sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 016328, Banco de la República - Economía Regional.
    13. Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2017. "Maternity and Family Leave Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 10500, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Palley, Elizabeth & Shdaimah, Corey, 2011. "Child care policy: A need for greater advocacy," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1159-1165, July.
    15. Zhelyazkova, N., 2013. "Fathers' use of parental leave. What do we know?," MERIT Working Papers 2013-022, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    16. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L’impact de la maternité sur l’activité des femmes aux Etats-Unis," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/9882, Sciences Po.
    17. Charles L. Baum, 2006. "The Effects Of Government‐Mandated Family Leave On Employer Family Leave Policies," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(3), pages 432-445, July.
    18. Palley, Elizabeth, 2010. "Who cares for children? Why are we where we are with American child care policy?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 155-163, February.
    19. Samantha Marie Schenck, 2021. "Assessing the Employment Effects of California’s Paid Family Leave Program," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 47(3), pages 406-429, June.
    20. Ann-Zofie Duvander & Gunnar Andersson, 2005. "Gender Equality and Fertility in Sweden: A Study on the Impact of the Father’s Uptake of Parental Leave on Continued Childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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